15 Mar 2005 22:35:57
Liz (I don't like Spam....)
Weeping in frustration....

Well, here I am, showing myself up as clueless beginner - I
bought some 2nd hand ice skates from eBay. They arrived
today, I tried them on and they are total agony. I'm weeping
with both pain and frustration - I was looking forward so much
to skating with my own boots, instead of rentals or the whacky
plastic boots I bought in a supermarket 10 years ago.
These boots are theoretically my size and my ankle feels nice
and snug, but my toes are screaming - not so much squished
against the end of the boot, but more pressure from above,
as if an elephant was standing on my toes. These are good
boots, SP-Teris, relatively new so not fully broken in yet.
Is there hope that I can break them in, and be able to stand
up in them without crying? Or are they just not for me?

I know, I know, I know, I shouldn't buy ice skates without
trying them on. Mea culpa etc.

Liz




15 Mar 2005 23:40:05
Fiona McQuarrie
Re: Weeping in frustration....

"Liz (I don't like Spam....)" <[email protected] > wrote:
: Well, here I am, showing myself up as clueless beginner - I
: bought some 2nd hand ice skates from eBay. They arrived
: today, I tried them on and they are total agony. I'm weeping
: with both pain and frustration - I was looking forward so much
: to skating with my own boots, instead of rentals or the whacky
: plastic boots I bought in a supermarket 10 years ago.
: These boots are theoretically my size and my ankle feels nice
: and snug, but my toes are screaming - not so much squished
: against the end of the boot, but more pressure from above,
: as if an elephant was standing on my toes. These are good
: boots, SP-Teris, relatively new so not fully broken in yet.
: Is there hope that I can break them in, and be able to stand
: up in them without crying? Or are they just not for me?

: I know, I know, I know, I shouldn't buy ice skates without
: trying them on. Mea culpa etc.

Don't give up just yet, Liz. Is there a skate shop or even a
bootmaker or shoe repair shop near you? Go to them and ask if they can
stretch or punch out the toes (not punching holes in them, but putting
"bumps" in them to widen the toe box). That might help.

Fiona



15 Mar 2005 18:04:14
johns
Re: Weeping in frustration....

The reason everybody sells their SP Teris is the know-
it-alls at SP Teri make their boots too narrow, and then
use a weird sizing chart that only looks like a normal
shoe size. It is not !!!!!!!! Stretching them at a boot
shop can only work if they are close to what you need.
I doubt it from what you say. You haven't had them on
the ice yet, and that pain is then going to include your
entire foot. Put up a notice at you rink advertising them
for sale, and you might get lucky. In the meantime,
have your local Pro size you for new Riedells. I really
advise going whole hog and getting into the Silverstars
with flex notch, and MK Pro blades. Note this: Pros
tend to size too small. Make sure that your Pro thinks
you should be in a size that is 1/2 size smaller than your
street shoe size ... same width. He / She will try to put
you in a size 1 full size smaller. Don't do it. I say Riedells
because they are about the only modern skate out there.
The rest of them use old technology, and those skates
are hard to break in. You will have no problems at all
breaking in the Silverstar. That outfit will cost you about
$450 and you will be in a skate that will last you many
many years, and be a fully qualified learning skate that
will get the job done.

johns




16 Mar 2005 06:12:11
Joanna Tsang Ramberg
Re: Weeping in frustration....

Hi, Liz!

I had the same experience with my old Riedells and having the toe box
stretch a few times DID help the situation.

And BTW despite johns recommendation for Riedell Silver Stars -- I
found when I was a beginning skater like yourself that it's WAAAAAY
too much boot at the time!!! Maybe when you get to ISI FS 4-6 jumps
maybe, but definitely NOT for beginners b/c you don't get enough give
to bend the ankle, which you will need to stay on the back of the
blade when you need them to be.

MK Pros are decent blades but again, once you get better! I
personally did decent with Wilson Excels myself, but it may be
different for you. You really need to get yourself to a really
good pro shop and talk to someone that knows what they're doing in
your area.

Good luck with your new boots! I think your problem can be dealt
with... but let's try stretching the toe box out first before putting
out what's otherwise a good pair of boots on sale on eBay, shall we?

Cheers,
Joanna


"Liz (I don't like Spam....)" wrote:
>
> Well, here I am, showing myself up as clueless beginner - I
> bought some 2nd hand ice skates from eBay. They arrived
> today, I tried them on and they are total agony. I'm weeping
> with both pain and frustration - I was looking forward so much
> to skating with my own boots, instead of rentals or the whacky
> plastic boots I bought in a supermarket 10 years ago.
> These boots are theoretically my size and my ankle feels nice
> and snug, but my toes are screaming - not so much squished
> against the end of the boot, but more pressure from above,
> as if an elephant was standing on my toes. These are good
> boots, SP-Teris, relatively new so not fully broken in yet.
> Is there hope that I can break them in, and be able to stand
> up in them without crying? Or are they just not for me?
>
> I know, I know, I know, I shouldn't buy ice skates without
> trying them on. Mea culpa etc.
>
> Liz

--

Reply to me at "jramberg" at <that email site at Microsoft >
Don't want no scrubs (or SPAM!!!) :-)


16 Mar 2005 13:13:53
Liz (I don't like Spam....)
!Re: Weeping in frustration....


"johns" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> The reason everybody sells their SP Teris is the know-
> it-alls at SP Teri make their boots too narrow, and then
> use a weird sizing chart that only looks like a normal
> shoe size. It is not !!!!!!!!

The size is theoretically correct for my foot length - no, I
didn't made the common mistake of confusing UK and US
shoes sizes. I was under the (mistaken?) impression that
SP-Teris were wider than the average boot in the toe box,
and narrower round the heel, which should suit me perfectly.
Sigh. That's why I'm so bitterly disappointed.

> Put up a notice at you rink advertising them
> for sale, and you might get lucky.

For some reason unknown, my rink doesn't allow a second
hand notice board, which is why I had to resort to eBay. Since
then I've learnt that the head instructor runs an informal used
boot exchange, so I can approach him with the boots if it all
turns out hopeless.


> In the meantime,
> have your local Pro size you for new Riedells

They only stock Belati. And I've never seen the darn shop
open - maybe 'cos normally I can only get to the rink at
weekends.

> I really
> advise going whole hog and getting into the Silverstars
> with flex notch, and MK Pro blades. ...
> The rest of them use old technology, and those skates
> are hard to break in. You will have no problems at all
> breaking in the Silverstar. That outfit will cost you about
> $450 and you will be in a skate that will last you many
> many years, and be a fully qualified learning skate that
> will get the job done.

Oh, they sounds nice. I wonder if they are available here?
And how I justify that expense.... hmmm, anyone seen
any of those on eBay? Sorry, only joking! Seriously,
thanks for all your advice, and I'll have a search (and start
a piggybank fund) for the Silverstars.

Liz




16 Mar 2005 05:22:17
[email protected]
Re: Weeping in frustration....

Liz:
"Is there hope that I can break them in, and be able to stand
up in them without crying? "

When I try on skate boots with professional fitters, we immediately
rule out any boot with tight toes.

In your place I would do this:
For the short run:
Get a cheap pair of slightly loose hockey skates and wear loose socks.
You can do plenty of fundamentals on these: stroking, crossovers,
mohawks, two foot spins,school figures. Since they are shorter blades
I would avoid threes since you can easily end up flat on your face or
back.

At the same time:
I would do whatever it takes to get to a skate shop for a fitting. If
I could afford it I would buy a decent blade, if not I would make do
with a $40 freestyle blade.

My first boots were used and fit me well. After a couple of years I
had them redo and had to break them in again. I still use them at home
for off ice stuff. If desired, I could have the inner covering redo and
still skate on them.

You only need beginning boots, and they will cost less than more
advanced boots.

S



16 Mar 2005 08:47:16
LK
Re: Weeping in frustration....

On Tue, 15 Mar 2005 22:35:57 -0000, "Liz (I don't like Spam....)"
<[email protected] > wrote:

>Well, here I am, showing myself up as clueless beginner - I
>bought some 2nd hand ice skates from eBay. They arrived
>today, I tried them on and they are total agony. I'm weeping
>with both pain and frustration - I was looking forward so much
>to skating with my own boots, instead of rentals or the whacky
>plastic boots I bought in a supermarket 10 years ago.
>These boots are theoretically my size and my ankle feels nice
>and snug, but my toes are screaming - not so much squished
>against the end of the boot, but more pressure from above,
>as if an elephant was standing on my toes. These are good
>boots, SP-Teris, relatively new so not fully broken in yet.
>Is there hope that I can break them in, and be able to stand
>up in them without crying? Or are they just not for me?
>
>I know, I know, I know, I shouldn't buy ice skates without
>trying them on. Mea culpa etc.
>
>Liz
>
Ask around at your rink for good places to go for a fitting and find
your skate size. Investigate different stores online, too. A good
fitting is more than worth it. A knowledgable fitter will tell you
advantages and fitting problems s/he has with particular brands/styles
of skates. And will tell you different ways to lace your skate for
better fit. A good fitter will not sell you too much skate for your
needs and expected progress for the next 3 years.

Remember skate prices are not that much compared to ice time and
lessons over a 3 year period. And quality skates are safer skates for
your body health and mental confidence.

Look for shops that sell used skates. Take someone along who knows a
good pair of skates.

If these new skates didn't cost too much, use them as a winter time
ornament at your home or office. That's what I'm doing with my $39.00
second-hand first pair of skates.

Post a notice at the rink of skates for sale and even outline the
insole on the notice.

Skates are an investment like a car. I wanted to take mine out on a
test drive before I bought but I couldn't do that. Research and
visits pay off.

Another point if you lace your skates too tight at the upper foot and
at the bend of the ankle it will put pressure on top of your toes.
Loosen the laces slightly and then snug 'em up above the ankle to
maintain support. This how I re-laced my 4 week-old Ridells when I
had pain on my toes that didn't go away after 15 minutes. The pain
went away instantly and I skated in comfort for the rest of the
session.

(I started skating at age 49 this past September.)

LK



16 Mar 2005 14:11:57
Liz (I don't like Spam....)
Re: Weeping in frustration....

Thank you to everyone for their suggestions!

I phoned the rink to a) ask the opening hours of the skate
shop, as I've never actually seen it operational and
b) would they attempt to stretch the sore spots on the boots?

The skate shop IS never open - it has no permanent staff, and
you have to ask at the reception desk for someone to come
and unlock for you. They don't do much trade....

And they don't do stretching - he suggested the hot wet cloth
and hair-dryer trick!

Liz




16 Mar 2005 14:23:43
Liz (I don't like Spam....)
Re: Weeping in frustration....


"LK" <[email protected] > wrote in message

> Ask around at your rink for good places to go for a fitting and find
> your skate size.
> Look for shops that sell used skates.
> Post a notice at the rink of skates for sale and even outline the
> insole on the notice.

Only skate shop hereabouts is the one at the rink (see my other post).
And they don't allow 2nd hand notices....


> Another point if you lace your skates too tight at the upper foot and
> at the bend of the ankle it will put pressure on top of your toes.
> Loosen the laces slightly and then snug 'em up above the ankle to
> maintain support. This how I re-laced my 4 week-old Ridells when I
> had pain on my toes that didn't go away after 15 minutes. The pain
> went away instantly and I skated in comfort for the rest of the
> session.

Now, this did occur to me as part of the problem. I ski, and I'm
finding ski boots much better designed than skates for balancing the
pain/control ratio - how to let blood reach your toes while keeping
your heel fixed down. I keep my ski boot toe buckles quite loose,
while the pressure is on around the ankle. The only way you
might do that with skates is by having 2 laces, one laced loosely
over the toes and tied off there, and another starting halfway
up the holes, laced tighter. Or just leaving the bottom holes
without any laces? Anyone tried this? Ack, why can't we
have independent clips/buckles for each part of the foot?
I guess the only reason people don't fix ice blades to their ski
boots is that they would look silly with tights and a sequined dress?

Liz




16 Mar 2005 15:03:56
Mrs Redboots
Re: Weeping in frustration....

Liz (I don't like Spam....) wrote to rec.sport.skating.ice.recreational
on Wed, 16 Mar 2005:

>
>"LK" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
>> Ask around at your rink for good places to go for a fitting and find
>> your skate size.
>> Look for shops that sell used skates.
>> Post a notice at the rink of skates for sale and even outline the
>> insole on the notice.
>
>Only skate shop hereabouts is the one at the rink (see my other post).
>And they don't allow 2nd hand notices....
>
Talk to whoever's taking your group classes - they will tell you where
to go. Meanwhile, put baby-food jars into the toes of your skates when
you aren't using them, to help stretch them out.

And ask for advice about lacing new-to-you boots. My own coach would
tell you to lace them very loosely over the foot, then pull them tight
at the ankle, and then lace them up to the top, but leaving the top
hooks a little looser to enable you to bend your ankle. And he
recommends putting baby-powder into the boot at first to help stop it
rubbing.

Don't give up yet - if they're still agony in a few weeks, then you may
have to get a new pair, but do ask your pro where to go. They may tell
you to avoid the shop, if it's the kind that mostly sells hockey boots
and just stocks a few basic Belatis (nothing wrong with them, but
they're horrible to break in!) and knows nothing about fitting figure
skates.
--
"Mrs Redboots" mailto:[email protected]
http://www.amsmyth.demon.co.uk/
Website updated 4 March 2005 with a new photo




16 Mar 2005 16:26:37
Steve
Re: !Re: Weeping in frustration....

Liz if you did want Riedells in the UK you could do worse than contact
Ian Robertson, see www.iceskate.co.uk . He imports these and I've just
got a pair of 220's which seem a nice light novice skate, very
comfortable. I did this via mail order, but by supplying foot tracings
and measurements as advised, and they fit well, he is pretty experienced
at selling boots this way and can give advice.

Steve

Liz (I don't like Spam....) wrote:
> "johns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>>The reason everybody sells their SP Teris is the know-
>>it-alls at SP Teri make their boots too narrow, and then
>>use a weird sizing chart that only looks like a normal
>>shoe size. It is not !!!!!!!!
>
>
> The size is theoretically correct for my foot length - no, I
> didn't made the common mistake of confusing UK and US
> shoes sizes. I was under the (mistaken?) impression that
> SP-Teris were wider than the average boot in the toe box,
> and narrower round the heel, which should suit me perfectly.
> Sigh. That's why I'm so bitterly disappointed.
>
>
>>Put up a notice at you rink advertising them
>>for sale, and you might get lucky.
>
>
> For some reason unknown, my rink doesn't allow a second
> hand notice board, which is why I had to resort to eBay. Since
> then I've learnt that the head instructor runs an informal used
> boot exchange, so I can approach him with the boots if it all
> turns out hopeless.
>
>
>
>> In the meantime,
>>have your local Pro size you for new Riedells
>
>
> They only stock Belati. And I've never seen the darn shop
> open - maybe 'cos normally I can only get to the rink at
> weekends.
>
>
>>I really
>>advise going whole hog and getting into the Silverstars
>>with flex notch, and MK Pro blades. ...
>>The rest of them use old technology, and those skates
>>are hard to break in. You will have no problems at all
>>breaking in the Silverstar. That outfit will cost you about
>>$450 and you will be in a skate that will last you many
>>many years, and be a fully qualified learning skate that
>>will get the job done.
>
>
> Oh, they sounds nice. I wonder if they are available here?
> And how I justify that expense.... hmmm, anyone seen
> any of those on eBay? Sorry, only joking! Seriously,
> thanks for all your advice, and I'll have a search (and start
> a piggybank fund) for the Silverstars.
>
> Liz
>
>


16 Mar 2005 16:28:19
Steve
Re: Weeping in frustration....

UK skate shops are very rarely open, and stock very little at all IME,
hence I do mail order myself,

Steve

Liz (I don't like Spam....) wrote:

> Thank you to everyone for their suggestions!
>
> I phoned the rink to a) ask the opening hours of the skate
> shop, as I've never actually seen it operational and
> b) would they attempt to stretch the sore spots on the boots?
>
> The skate shop IS never open - it has no permanent staff, and
> you have to ask at the reception desk for someone to come
> and unlock for you. They don't do much trade....
>
> And they don't do stretching - he suggested the hot wet cloth
> and hair-dryer trick!
>
> Liz
>
>


16 Mar 2005 11:34:43
[email protected]
Re: Weeping in frustration....

discarded hockey pucks also work to help with stretching out a tad or
maintaining it. Loosen the skate laces as much as possible and shove the
puck as far as it will go into the toe box with the flat part up.

"Mrs Redboots" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Liz (I don't like Spam....) wrote to rec.sport.skating.ice.recreational
> on Wed, 16 Mar 2005:
>
> >
> >"LK" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> >
> >> Ask around at your rink for good places to go for a fitting and find
> >> your skate size.
> >> Look for shops that sell used skates.
> >> Post a notice at the rink of skates for sale and even outline the
> >> insole on the notice.
> >
> >Only skate shop hereabouts is the one at the rink (see my other post).
> >And they don't allow 2nd hand notices....
> >
> Talk to whoever's taking your group classes - they will tell you where
> to go. Meanwhile, put baby-food jars into the toes of your skates when
> you aren't using them, to help stretch them out.
>
> And ask for advice about lacing new-to-you boots. My own coach would
> tell you to lace them very loosely over the foot, then pull them tight
> at the ankle, and then lace them up to the top, but leaving the top
> hooks a little looser to enable you to bend your ankle. And he
> recommends putting baby-powder into the boot at first to help stop it
> rubbing.
>
> Don't give up yet - if they're still agony in a few weeks, then you may
> have to get a new pair, but do ask your pro where to go. They may tell
> you to avoid the shop, if it's the kind that mostly sells hockey boots
> and just stocks a few basic Belatis (nothing wrong with them, but
> they're horrible to break in!) and knows nothing about fitting figure
> skates.
> --
> "Mrs Redboots" mailto:[email protected]
> http://www.amsmyth.demon.co.uk/
> Website updated 4 March 2005 with a new photo
>
>




16 Mar 2005 17:13:24
Mrs Redboots
Re: Weeping in frustration....

Steve wrote to rec.sport.skating.ice.recreational on Wed, 16 Mar 2005:

>UK skate shops are very rarely open, and stock very little at all IME,
>hence I do mail order myself,
>
They seem to be mainly hockey-oriented. If you know exactly what you
want, they'll order it for you, but other than that, they're hopeless.
--
"Mrs Redboots" mailto:[email protected]
http://www.amsmyth.demon.co.uk/
Website updated 4 March 2005 with a new photo




16 Mar 2005 17:49:11
Steve
Re: Weeping in frustration....

Just to say if you are looking for a mail order vendor Ian Robertson,
Specialist Skating Services ( see www.iceskate.co.uk ) sells Riedells in the
UK. I've just bought some 220's which seem a nice light beginner boot. He
works from foot tracings and measurements, and mine fit fine, he can advise
how to measure.

This is the second attempt at this post, apologies if it ends up as a double,
dumped Netscape, new reader :-)

--
Steve


16 Mar 2005 19:11:32
Liz (I don't like Spam....)
Re: Weeping in frustration....


"Steve" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Just to say if you are looking for a mail order vendor Ian Robertson,
> Specialist Skating Services ( see www.iceskate.co.uk ) sells Riedells in
> the
> UK. I've just bought some 220's which seem a nice light beginner boot. He
> works from foot tracings and measurements, and mine fit fine, he can
> advise
> how to measure.

Dare I ask how much????




16 Mar 2005 19:12:51
Liz (I don't like Spam....)
Re: Weeping in frustration....

I don't have any hockey pucks lying around the house (!), but I've
been eyeing up some of the kids' toys...

Liz


"[email protected]" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> discarded hockey pucks also work to help with stretching out a tad or
> maintaining it. Loosen the skate laces as much as possible and shove the
> puck as far as it will go into the toe box with the flat part up.
>
> "Mrs Redboots" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>> Liz (I don't like Spam....) wrote to rec.sport.skating.ice.recreational
>> on Wed, 16 Mar 2005:
>>
>> >
>> >"LK" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> >
>> >> Ask around at your rink for good places to go for a fitting and find
>> >> your skate size.
>> >> Look for shops that sell used skates.
>> >> Post a notice at the rink of skates for sale and even outline the
>> >> insole on the notice.
>> >
>> >Only skate shop hereabouts is the one at the rink (see my other post).
>> >And they don't allow 2nd hand notices....
>> >
>> Talk to whoever's taking your group classes - they will tell you where
>> to go. Meanwhile, put baby-food jars into the toes of your skates when
>> you aren't using them, to help stretch them out.
>>
>> And ask for advice about lacing new-to-you boots. My own coach would
>> tell you to lace them very loosely over the foot, then pull them tight
>> at the ankle, and then lace them up to the top, but leaving the top
>> hooks a little looser to enable you to bend your ankle. And he
>> recommends putting baby-powder into the boot at first to help stop it
>> rubbing.
>>
>> Don't give up yet - if they're still agony in a few weeks, then you may
>> have to get a new pair, but do ask your pro where to go. They may tell
>> you to avoid the shop, if it's the kind that mostly sells hockey boots
>> and just stocks a few basic Belatis (nothing wrong with them, but
>> they're horrible to break in!) and knows nothing about fitting figure
>> skates.
>> --
>> "Mrs Redboots" mailto:[email protected]
>> http://www.amsmyth.demon.co.uk/
>> Website updated 4 March 2005 with a new photo
>>
>>
>
>




16 Mar 2005 19:13:34
Liz (I don't like Spam....)
Re: !Re: Weeping in frustration....

Thanks for that Steve, good to know there's someone who might
be able to do a long-range fitting! Actually, having looked at their
website, the boots that appeal most to me are the Grafs - somehow
they just LOOK more comfortable than any of the others! Anyone
any experience with them?

Cheers,
Liz

"Steve" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Liz if you did want Riedells in the UK you could do worse than contact Ian
> Robertson, see www.iceskate.co.uk . He imports these and I've just got a
> pair of 220's which seem a nice light novice skate, very comfortable. I
> did this via mail order, but by supplying foot tracings and measurements
> as advised, and they fit well, he is pretty experienced at selling boots
> this way and can give advice.
>
> Steve
>
> Liz (I don't like Spam....) wrote:
>> "johns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>
>>>The reason everybody sells their SP Teris is the know-
>>>it-alls at SP Teri make their boots too narrow, and then
>>>use a weird sizing chart that only looks like a normal
>>>shoe size. It is not !!!!!!!!
>>
>>
>> The size is theoretically correct for my foot length - no, I
>> didn't made the common mistake of confusing UK and US
>> shoes sizes. I was under the (mistaken?) impression that
>> SP-Teris were wider than the average boot in the toe box,
>> and narrower round the heel, which should suit me perfectly.
>> Sigh. That's why I'm so bitterly disappointed.
>>
>>
>>>Put up a notice at you rink advertising them
>>>for sale, and you might get lucky.
>>
>>
>> For some reason unknown, my rink doesn't allow a second
>> hand notice board, which is why I had to resort to eBay. Since
>> then I've learnt that the head instructor runs an informal used
>> boot exchange, so I can approach him with the boots if it all
>> turns out hopeless.
>>
>>
>>
>>> In the meantime,
>>>have your local Pro size you for new Riedells
>>
>>
>> They only stock Belati. And I've never seen the darn shop
>> open - maybe 'cos normally I can only get to the rink at
>> weekends.
>>
>>
>>>I really
>>>advise going whole hog and getting into the Silverstars
>>>with flex notch, and MK Pro blades. ...
>>>The rest of them use old technology, and those skates
>>>are hard to break in. You will have no problems at all
>>>breaking in the Silverstar. That outfit will cost you about
>>>$450 and you will be in a skate that will last you many
>>>many years, and be a fully qualified learning skate that
>>>will get the job done.
>>
>>
>> Oh, they sounds nice. I wonder if they are available here?
>> And how I justify that expense.... hmmm, anyone seen
>> any of those on eBay? Sorry, only joking! Seriously,
>> thanks for all your advice, and I'll have a search (and start
>> a piggybank fund) for the Silverstars.
>>
>> Liz
>>



16 Mar 2005 19:21:20
Liz (I don't like Spam....)
Re: Weeping in frustration....


"Mrs Redboots" <[email protected] > wrote in message

> Meanwhile, put baby-food jars into the toes of your skates when
> you aren't using them, to help stretch them out.

(rummaging in cupboard...) would out-of-date BabyOrganix do?




16 Mar 2005 23:16:52
Steve
Re: Weeping in frustration....

More than buying them in the US, that's for sure, GBP 160, but they *are* very
comfortable :-).

Steve


"Liz (I don't like Spam....)" <[email protected] > wrote:
>
>"Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> Just to say if you are looking for a mail order vendor Ian Robertson,
>> Specialist Skating Services ( see www.iceskate.co.uk ) sells Riedells in
>> the
>> UK. I've just bought some 220's which seem a nice light beginner boot. He
>> works from foot tracings and measurements, and mine fit fine, he can
>> advise
>> how to measure.
>
>Dare I ask how much????
>
>



16 Mar 2005 23:26:08
Steve
Re: !Re: Weeping in frustration....

I asked Ian about Grafs as based on their website they did look comfortable.
His advice was that they tend to be pretty stiff for a beginner, and he
suggested Riedells.


"Liz (I don't like Spam....)" <[email protected] > wrote:
>Thanks for that Steve, good to know there's someone who might
>be able to do a long-range fitting! Actually, having looked at their
>website, the boots that appeal most to me are the Grafs - somehow
>they just LOOK more comfortable than any of the others! Anyone
>any experience with them?
>
>Cheers,
>Liz
>
>"Steve" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>> Liz if you did want Riedells in the UK you could do worse than contact Ian
>> Robertson, see www.iceskate.co.uk . He imports these and I've just got a
>> pair of 220's which seem a nice light novice skate, very comfortable. I
>> did this via mail order, but by supplying foot tracings and measurements
>> as advised, and they fit well, he is pretty experienced at selling boots
>> this way and can give advice.
>>
>> Steve
>>
>> Liz (I don't like Spam....) wrote:
>>> "johns" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>> news:[email protected]
>>>
>>>>The reason everybody sells their SP Teris is the know-
>>>>it-alls at SP Teri make their boots too narrow, and then
>>>>use a weird sizing chart that only looks like a normal
>>>>shoe size. It is not !!!!!!!!
>>>
>>>
>>> The size is theoretically correct for my foot length - no, I
>>> didn't made the common mistake of confusing UK and US
>>> shoes sizes. I was under the (mistaken?) impression that
>>> SP-Teris were wider than the average boot in the toe box,
>>> and narrower round the heel, which should suit me perfectly.
>>> Sigh. That's why I'm so bitterly disappointed.
>>>
>>>
>>>>Put up a notice at you rink advertising them
>>>>for sale, and you might get lucky.
>>>
>>>
>>> For some reason unknown, my rink doesn't allow a second
>>> hand notice board, which is why I had to resort to eBay. Since
>>> then I've learnt that the head instructor runs an informal used
>>> boot exchange, so I can approach him with the boots if it all
>>> turns out hopeless.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>> In the meantime,
>>>>have your local Pro size you for new Riedells
>>>
>>>
>>> They only stock Belati. And I've never seen the darn shop
>>> open - maybe 'cos normally I can only get to the rink at
>>> weekends.
>>>
>>>
>>>>I really
>>>>advise going whole hog and getting into the Silverstars
>>>>with flex notch, and MK Pro blades. ...
>>>>The rest of them use old technology, and those skates
>>>>are hard to break in. You will have no problems at all
>>>>breaking in the Silverstar. That outfit will cost you about
>>>>$450 and you will be in a skate that will last you many
>>>>many years, and be a fully qualified learning skate that
>>>>will get the job done.
>>>
>>>
>>> Oh, they sounds nice. I wonder if they are available here?
>>> And how I justify that expense.... hmmm, anyone seen
>>> any of those on eBay? Sorry, only joking! Seriously,
>>> thanks for all your advice, and I'll have a search (and start
>>> a piggybank fund) for the Silverstars.
>>>
>>> Liz
>>>
>



17 Mar 2005 12:44:40
Mrs Redboots
Re: Weeping in frustration....

Liz (I don't like Spam....) wrote to rec.sport.skating.ice.recreational
on Wed, 16 Mar 2005:

>
>"Mrs Redboots" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>
>> Meanwhile, put baby-food jars into the toes of your skates when
>> you aren't using them, to help stretch them out.
>
>(rummaging in cupboard...) would out-of-date BabyOrganix do?
>
I don't know, would it?
--
"Mrs Redboots" mailto:[email protected]
http://www.amsmyth.demon.co.uk/
Website updated 4 March 2005 with a new photo




17 Mar 2005 11:25:32
Gonna Skate
Re: Weeping in frustration....

Steve wrote:
> Just to say if you are looking for a mail order vendor Ian Robertson,
> Specialist Skating Services ( see www.iceskate.co.uk ) sells Riedells
in the
> UK. I've just bought some 220's which seem a nice light beginner
boot. He
> works from foot tracings and measurements, and mine fit fine, he can
advise
> how to measure.


I'd second the idea of Riedell 220s for a beginner skater. That is what
I bought and I really like them for a lot of reasons. But I'm
progressing very slowly, and if you anticipate that you'll be doing
jumps within a year, you might want to try something else. Or you might
want to upgrade the blade a bit (I use the stock blade, which is a
Wilson Excel). The boots cost me about $200 US including blade. In the
long run this is much less expensive than renting.

I wear about a size 7.5 - 8 US ladies shoe and was fitted to a size 6
Wide boot. I did have the boots punched out in a few places. I don't
have any extra bumps growing on my feet and never got a single blister.

Riedell 220s are a 2 ply boot. They have a softer toe box and are also
more flexible through the ankle. But this works for me so far (no
jumping). They will be more comfortable for a beginner.

The 220s have rather rough suede lining. I learned to really pull the
tongue out before I slide my foot in. I also wear "trouser socks" which
are very thin socks made from the same type of fabric that tights are
made but less expensive than official skating socks.

About lacing: I have a skating friend who starts his laces past the
ball of his foot. He skips the first few lace holes entirely (he
started this when he broke a lace and didn't have a replacement long
enough). He is an ice dancer who does some jumping and LOTS of footwork
and even lifts his partner. He says he doesn't notice any difference in
the amount of support he gets. This might be a good idea for wide
footed people, or for people who want "zone" snugness in their laces.
Though I'd worry about how it would wear on the boot in the long run.

I keep the laces through the foot of my skate rather loose. Between the
eyelet holes and the ankle hooks I add a half hitch. I wrap each ankle
hook from the top. The hook laces don't "average out" while I skate and
none of the slack travels down to the eyelet area.

My next pair of boots will probably be custom because I want a dance
notch in the back, no dance heal, a flexi notch at the ankle, wide
tongue with stabilizer, softer toe box like the one I have now and
supportive ankles with extra padding. Sort of a recreational dance boot
for maximum comfort and moderate support. I really want to point my
toes but don't see myself ever doing much jumping.

And I'm sure that is way more than anyone wants to know about me and my
boots!

-Gonna Skate