17 Jun 2007 21:53:01
Is entry level coaching possible near Maryland?

There are no legal certification requirements for coaches, but near
where I live, all the rinks expect coaches to be at a fairly high
competitive or test level.

I'm an adult male who has tested the first 3 ice dances (USFSA), which
is all the skating skills I would officially need to get a PSA
certification and PSA insurance. With a few months work I might
perhaps pass the next 2 or 3 dances. Of course it takes a fair bit of
work and time to pass the other components of a PSA test. Freestyle
beyond ISI FS 1 is out of my league.

I like to think I skate with some measure of grace and speed, and can
support an unsteady skater. I'd love to teach entry level adults.

Is this is a realistic goal? As stated, it isn't near where I live,
but I wonder whether it might be in less popular places. For that
matter, are the PSA cert and insurance needed such places?



18 Jun 2007 21:31:54
Lyle Walsh
Re: Is entry level coaching possible near Maryland?


<[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> There are no legal certification requirements for coaches, but near
> where I live, all the rinks expect coaches to be at a fairly high
> competitive or test level.
>
> I'm an adult male who has tested the first 3 ice dances (USFSA), which
> is all the skating skills I would officially need to get a PSA
> certification and PSA insurance. With a few months work I might
> perhaps pass the next 2 or 3 dances. Of course it takes a fair bit of
> work and time to pass the other components of a PSA test. Freestyle
> beyond ISI FS 1 is out of my league.
>
> I like to think I skate with some measure of grace and speed, and can
> support an unsteady skater. I'd love to teach entry level adults.
>
> Is this is a realistic goal? As stated, it isn't near where I live,
> but I wonder whether it might be in less popular places. For that
> matter, are the PSA cert and insurance needed such places?
>

hmm, I suggest you post this on skatingforums.com and also most of the ice
dancers are on google groups. This NG is about dead, sigh. Best of Luck
L_NOSPAM_yle




19 Jun 2007 12:55:48
Re: Is entry level coaching possible near Maryland?

I'm still here, so I'll give my thoughts.

I think it's great that you are interested in teaching. That said, I've
passed the first six dances, and would not consider teaching ice
dance even to beginners any time soon. There are too many small details
I wouldn't pick up on. And I would not have wanted to be taught by someone who
didn't have significantly more dance experience than you have.

If I were you, I would pass several more levels before considering
teaching. It might be that you could become a teaching assistant or
take some people through tests before then, if you are a very solid skater.

I'd recommend joining the Yahoo group at
http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/icedancers/
Lots of wisdom there.

Johanna

In article <[email protected] >, "Lyle Walsh"
<[email protected] > wrote:

> <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > There are no legal certification requirements for coaches, but near
> > where I live, all the rinks expect coaches to be at a fairly high
> > competitive or test level.
> >
> > I'm an adult male who has tested the first 3 ice dances (USFSA), which
> > is all the skating skills I would officially need to get a PSA
> > certification and PSA insurance. With a few months work I might
> > perhaps pass the next 2 or 3 dances. Of course it takes a fair bit of
> > work and time to pass the other components of a PSA test. Freestyle
> > beyond ISI FS 1 is out of my league.
> >
> > I like to think I skate with some measure of grace and speed, and can
> > support an unsteady skater. I'd love to teach entry level adults.
> >
> > Is this is a realistic goal? As stated, it isn't near where I live,
> > but I wonder whether it might be in less popular places. For that
> > matter, are the PSA cert and insurance needed such places?
> >
>
> hmm, I suggest you post this on skatingforums.com and also most of the ice
> dancers are on google groups. This NG is about dead, sigh. Best of Luck
> L_NOSPAM_yle


19 Jun 2007 13:26:47
Re: Is entry level coaching possible near Maryland?

Adding on to my own message, I should say that I also live in
an area with many highly trained dance coaches. I know there are places in
the US
where people have to test on the solo track because there aren't any male
coaches, so they might be open to a lower-level dancer doing some coaching.
I would still recommend passing quite a few more tests first, though.

Sorry that I don't know the answers to your insurance/PSA questions.

Johanna

In article <[email protected] >,
[email protected] wrote:

> I'm still here, so I'll give my thoughts.
>
> I think it's great that you are interested in teaching. That said, I've
> passed the first six dances, and would not consider teaching ice
> dance even to beginners any time soon. There are too many small details
> I wouldn't pick up on. And I would not have wanted to be taught by
someone who
> didn't have significantly more dance experience than you have.
>
> If I were you, I would pass several more levels before considering
> teaching. It might be that you could become a teaching assistant or
> take some people through tests before then, if you are a very solid skater.
>
> I'd recommend joining the Yahoo group at
> http://sports.groups.yahoo.com/group/icedancers/
> Lots of wisdom there.
>
> Johanna
>


21 Jun 2007 22:56:32
Gordon
Re: Is entry level coaching possible near Maryland?

On Jun 17, 2:53 pm, [email protected] wrote:
> There are no legal certification requirements for coaches, but near
> where I live, all the rinks expect coaches to be at a fairly high
> competitive or test level.

I think it would be exceedingly not a good idea (!) to be teaching
and not be a member of PSA. You can, I believe, join PSA and be
covered by their insurance without having passed their various
certifications. You really need the CYA in this litigious society of
ours.

Beyond that... I do agree that teaching ice dance would probably
require more dances passed by you, and/or some amount of competition
experience. When I look for a coach I am looking for someone who can
do what I want to do and somewhat beyond and has some experience in
competition since I want to compete.

That said, you could probably teach the lower levels of LTS,
especially if you started out as an assistant for a year or two.
>
> I'm an adult male who has tested the first 3 ice dances (USFSA), which
> is all the skating skills I would officially need to get a PSA
> certification and PSA insurance. With a few months work I might
> perhaps pass the next 2 or 3 dances. Of course it takes a fair bit of
> work and time to pass the other components of a PSA test. Freestyle
> beyond ISI FS 1 is out of my league.
>
> I like to think I skate with some measure of grace and speed, and can
> support an unsteady skater. I'd love to teach entry level adults.
>
> Is this is a realistic goal? As stated, it isn't near where I live,
> but I wonder whether it might be in less popular places. For that
> matter, are the PSA cert and insurance needed such places?




24 Jun 2007 04:14:07
johns
Re: Is entry level coaching possible near Maryland?

Learning ice dances is no big thing. I learned 14 dances in one
season, and that process taught me a lot about the fine points
of the beginner dances. For one thing, it is stupid to spend a
world of time perfecting the beginning dances. You need to move
rapidly to the advanced dances, and work on THOSE requirements,
as they are the ones that give good style. As for a coaching
requirement, I would rather work with a coach who has learned
all the basic MITF , and then has applied those moves back to
dance drills. Otherwise, you'll be a plodder just going through
the motions, but not really "dancing" your dances. And, you
don't need a coach for any of this. You DO need a dance
partner, or you will never learn the holds. That is very political,
and not much fun. Our dance program here totally failed because
every guy who got involved in it was accused of "chasing women"
by the staff. They were the stupid pricks who eventually caused
us to lose our ice rink. So don't invest a lot in this sort of thing
until you have done enough of it to see the built-in problems,
and whether or not the program will hang together at your rink.

If it gets going for you, I can tell you where to get most of the
dance drawings, and then explain how the steps are done.
Also, I know the "dancy" style you want to learn, and the
drills that will get you there. The MITF tapes are great. You
need those.

If you manage to get a dance partner to work with, do NOT
take lessons from a dance coach until you both have maybe
15 dances well learned. Otherwise, you will get caught up
in that "edges" scam the morons always trap you into, and
your development will totally fail. I can give you the "edges"
drills you need, and you will see that those drills are teachers
in themselves:

For example: The Swing Roll drill .... find a hockey line that
runs across the width of the rink. Stand to one end, facing
down the length of the rink. Push straight off down the rink,
and do a swing roll that carries you back to the hockey
line, but now facing down the rink the opposit way. As you
make this U-turn, your free skate should come beside your
glide skate JUST as you return to the hockey line. You
place your new glide skated directly on the ice beside
the old glide skate, and push off into the opposit Swing
Roll. You should be able to repeat this move all the way
down the hockey line ... U-turn, after U-turn, after U-turn.
Make each roll-turn "growl" by kicking sharply across the
glide skate. All of those are properly done swing rolls,
and once you find the balance point, you will have proper
style in your swing rolls.

johns



27 Jun 2007 23:21:56
Marizel
Re: Is entry level coaching possible near Maryland?

On Sun, 17 Jun 2007 21:53:01 -0000, [email protected] wrote:

>There are no legal certification requirements for coaches, but near
>where I live, all the rinks expect coaches to be at a fairly high
>competitive or test level.
>
>I'm an adult male who has tested the first 3 ice dances (USFSA), which
>is all the skating skills I would officially need to get a PSA
>certification and PSA insurance. With a few months work I might
>perhaps pass the next 2 or 3 dances. Of course it takes a fair bit of
>work and time to pass the other components of a PSA test. Freestyle
>beyond ISI FS 1 is out of my league.
>
>I like to think I skate with some measure of grace and speed, and can
>support an unsteady skater. I'd love to teach entry level adults.
>
>Is this is a realistic goal? As stated, it isn't near where I live,
>but I wonder whether it might be in less popular places. For that
>matter, are the PSA cert and insurance needed such places?

I might as well weigh in with my thoughts.

It would be unwise to teach private lessons without some sort of
liability insurance to protect you. You don't necessarily need to be
a PSA member to get this--PSA, USFSA, and ISI all offer coaching
insurance.

A good place to start would be as a group lesson instructor for basic
skills. You'd have colleagues and a skating director to help you get
started. You wouldn't need the insurance for that, because you should
be covered by the program's insurance when they sign you up as a
coach.

There is Dance track in the USFS basic skills program, though it
doesn't seem to be widely offered. After you've proven yourself a bit
at the lower levels, you might see if there's interest in that.

I'm not sure if you meant you wanted to teach entry level dance to
adults or teach entry level (beginner) adult skaters. To even begin
dance, a skater has to be skating fairly proficiently. After
teaching group lessons, you might begin by offering private lessons to
beginning adults who need a little more attention than they get in the
groups. I think you might not be quite ready to tackle private dance
instruction on your own, but you might see if you could assist an
established dance coach or offer your services as a partner for
practice sessions. If you do decide to teach beginning dancers on
your own, you should be upfront about your limitations, and prepared
to pass your students on to another instructor when they get to higher
levels.

I live in a fairly small town with a small rink, and we are usually
pretty happy to work with such coaches as we can get. If you are
upfront about your level of expertise and willing to work your way up
the ladder and learn as much as you can as you go along, you can
probably find someplace where you could make a good contribution.

There are some new coaching requirements in the work for USFS
coaches--I'll post them in a separate thread.

Mary