20 Nov 2003 00:49:01
John Mianowski
Indoor Arena Business Case

Can anybody tell me how the financials are done to get indoor
hockey/skating/soccer/etc arenas built? I have a hard time imaging
that they can get paid for out of user & league fees. Can anybody
clue me in?

Thanks,

JM


20 Nov 2003 00:58:02
Isiafs5
Re: Indoor Arena Business Case

> John Mianowski
>Can anybody tell me how the financials are done to get indoor
>hockey/skating/soccer/etc arenas built? I have a hard time imaging
>that they can get paid for out of user & league fees. Can anybody
>clue me in?

Here in the Midwest, every rink that I have seen is part of a city park
district program. So, its the same financing as swimming pools and tennis
courts here.


Sling Skate

My recommended reading for body fat control:
http://www.geocities.com/~slopitch/drsquat/fredzig.htm












20 Nov 2003 01:01:10
Fiona McQuarrie
Re: Indoor Arena Business Case

Isiafs5 <[email protected] > wrote:
: > John Mianowski
: >Can anybody tell me how the financials are done to get indoor
: >hockey/skating/soccer/etc arenas built? I have a hard time imaging
: >that they can get paid for out of user & league fees. Can anybody
: >clue me in?

: Here in the Midwest, every rink that I have seen is part of a city park
: district program. So, its the same financing as swimming pools and tennis
: courts here.

Same here (Western Canada), although some privately owned rinks have
recently been built with city help (tax exemptions, development variances,
etc.) on the basis that the city gets a certain amount of ice time, or a
discount rate for ice time, for its own programming.

Fiona










20 Nov 2003 13:24:21
Annabel Smyth
Re: Indoor Arena Business Case

On Thu, 20 Nov 2003 at 00:49:01, John Mianowski
<[email protected] > wrote:

>Can anybody tell me how the financials are done to get indoor
>hockey/skating/soccer/etc arenas built? I have a hard time imaging
>that they can get paid for out of user & league fees. Can anybody
>clue me in?
>
Sponsorship. Either from a national sports-promoting body, if you have
one, or from local businesses.
--
Annabel Smyth mailto:[email protected]
http://www.amsmyth.demon.co.uk/index.html
Website updated 23 September 2003


20 Nov 2003 10:59:52
W Letendre
Re: Indoor Arena Business Case

Annabel Smyth <[email protected] > wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
> On Thu, 20 Nov 2003 at 00:49:01, John Mianowski
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >Can anybody tell me how the financials are done to get indoor
> >hockey/skating/soccer/etc arenas built? I have a hard time imaging
> >that they can get paid for out of user & league fees. Can anybody
> >clue me in?
> >
> Sponsorship. Either from a national sports-promoting body, if you have
> one, or from local businesses.

Certainly do see advertising revenues at work in ice rinks here. Our
local rinks have all of them sold every square inch of the ice sheet
side walls for advertising, and most have banners and billboards on
the rink building interior walls and ceilings as well!

After a while, you no longer even see the posters advertising local
banks, sporting goods shops, and used car dealers. Still, does make
for a nice change when the local ponds freeze over, and one can see
trees and open skies while skating, instead....

W Letendre


21 Nov 2003 13:25:50
dooobedooo
Re: Indoor Arena Business Case

The newer rinks (or rinks scheduled to be built) in the UK have
generally some of the following in their favour:
1. The land is very cheap, possibly because it is remote.
2. The land is zoned for recreational use, so the local authority are
obliged to use it for this purpose.
3. There are tourism or similar financial benefits from building a
really top complex that will attract recreational or competitive
skaters or audiences.
4. They attract funding from specialist government organisations such
as English Sport (the Sports Council) or the National Lottery.
5. For historic reasons, there is huge local support for an ice rink
, and this attracts local authority funding and support.
6. Someone rich left some money.
7. The rink is part of a larger complex where businesses have a
symbiotic relationship, with customers sharing and paying for benefits
(eg. rink, ski slope, hotel, petrol station, car retail franchise)
8. There is what is known as "planning gain" where eg. a supermarket
is permitted planning permission in exchange for them paying a large
amount of money to support the parallel construction of a rink.
9. A university or similar builds the rink as part of sports
provision.

So we have Bracknell (1,7) Guildford (8, 5, 1,2,3,4) Cambourne (6,
1, 2, 5)
Brighton (1, 2, 3, 4, 7) Sheffield (5, 4, 7) Nottingham (2, 3, 4,
5)

I really don't think it is possible to build a successful local rink
without first getting someone on the local authority (/university etc)
on your side in a big way. But to do that you need a good business
plan, which emphasises the social and sporting benefits as well as
calculating the bottom line. Commercially run rinks can derive extra
income from concerts and conferences (lay down false floor over ice on
a Sunday night); from discos which bring in a lot of paying bodies;
from associated businesses like restaurants, bars, clothing stores
etc.

The reason France has so many rinks is that some former French Prime
minister (was it Mitterand?) decided he wanted to have a rink
accessible to every major town, and they got government funding.
And France is now a very successful skating nation.