22 Feb 2007 15:08:09
Jake
Wooden boatbuilding question

Anybody on here ever got involved with fixing wooden rowing boats?
I have recently purchased a badly vandal damaged 1980s cedar Stampfli
single. An insurance writeoff. Some teenagers broke into our boathouse
and climbed up the boat racks and thought it would be a laugh to stamp
all over this formerly exquisite condition Swiss built sculling boat.
Although I think it can be fixed to rowable if not cosmetically
perfect condition with great care and attention, unfortunately
somebody has attempted a bodged repair already, making the task much
more of a challenge. It is still correctly boat shaped and stiff in
both longitudinal and transverse planes, apart from the 14 inch long
crack in it. The keel amazingly has stayed in one piece and remained
bonded to the skin throughout.
I really should have just walked away from this but all last winter I
coveted this boat. Training alone in the draughty boathouse, in the
rest periods between my weights sets I would wander over to it and
marvel at it's beauty and quality of construction, so I wouldn't like
to think of it being cut up into bookshelves or worse.
It throws up the following questions:
1) Anybody know of a paint stripper type product that will dissolve
set West epoxy (but not wood) would Nitromors do it?
2) Where can I get a reasonably colour and grain matched vaneer in the
UK? Are there any places you can send a sliver off to and they send
their closest match back?
3) Once I've got the outside shape I will eventually reinforce from
the inside using more modern materials and epoxy. what works best with
wood? carbon or aramid, and briefly why?
4) Elsewhere there is a tiny dent in it. I need to fill the dent (as I
plan to race the boat and want it fair), but don't want to leave a
filler blotch on the woodwork. Is there such a thing as transparent,
easily sandable filler, or some kind of workaround to fill a dent in a
wooden boat 'invisibly'. The dent is less than 1 mm deep.

Any solutions gratefully received!
Jake



22 Feb 2007 23:41:09
Carl Douglas
Re: Wooden boatbuilding question

Jake wrote:
> Anybody on here ever got involved with fixing wooden rowing boats?
> I have recently purchased a badly vandal damaged 1980s cedar Stampfli
> single. An insurance writeoff. Some teenagers broke into our boathouse
> and climbed up the boat racks and thought it would be a laugh to stamp
> all over this formerly exquisite condition Swiss built sculling boat.
> Although I think it can be fixed to rowable if not cosmetically
> perfect condition with great care and attention, unfortunately
> somebody has attempted a bodged repair already, making the task much
> more of a challenge. It is still correctly boat shaped and stiff in
> both longitudinal and transverse planes, apart from the 14 inch long
> crack in it. The keel amazingly has stayed in one piece and remained
> bonded to the skin throughout.
> I really should have just walked away from this but all last winter I
> coveted this boat. Training alone in the draughty boathouse, in the
> rest periods between my weights sets I would wander over to it and
> marvel at it's beauty and quality of construction, so I wouldn't like
> to think of it being cut up into bookshelves or worse.
> It throws up the following questions:
> 1) Anybody know of a paint stripper type product that will dissolve
> set West epoxy (but not wood) would Nitromors do it?

Yes.

> 2) Where can I get a reasonably colour and grain matched vaneer in the
> UK? Are there any places you can send a sliver off to and they send
> their closest match back?

We might be able to help.

> 3) Once I've got the outside shape I will eventually reinforce from
> the inside using more modern materials and epoxy. what works best with
> wood? carbon or aramid, and briefly why?

You can't reinforce onto a varnished surface because you won't get a
decent bond. Stampflis were externally reinforced, to a low level, by a
layer of very thin plain-weave dacron/terylene cloth, varnished onto the
outer surface. It was the first move away from the more-splittable
single-plank construction, but the outer cloth layer was easily
separated at a ding, making invisible repair tricky.

If you strip the entire outer surface you could meaningfully reinforce
by applying a very thin, suitably treated glass cloth (<100g/sq m) onto
an epoxied surface and then re-coating it (without puckering or
stretching the cloth weave!). Use a liquid epoxy, e.g. SP320 (System
Three & West will also have UV-resistant clear coating resins), & be
sure to apply it & cure it in warm, dry conditions to avoid a tacky
surface. When cured, sand flat and varnish.

> 4) Elsewhere there is a tiny dent in it. I need to fill the dent (as I
> plan to race the boat and want it fair), but don't want to leave a
> filler blotch on the woodwork. Is there such a thing as transparent,
> easily sandable filler, or some kind of workaround to fill a dent in a
> wooden boat 'invisibly'. The dent is less than 1 mm deep.

Use a clear epoxy resin, as above. You may get an improvement if you
steam that locality - wood is a complex of minute cellulosic tubes (a
highly advanced modern composite!) & these have surprising powers of
recovery from crush damage.

>
> Any solutions gratefully received!
> Jake
>

You're welcome -
Carl

--
Carl Douglas Racing Shells -
Fine Small-Boats/AeRoWing low-drag Riggers/Advanced Accessories
Write: The Boathouse, Timsway, Chertsey Lane, Staines TW18 3JY, UK
Email: [email protected] Tel: +44(0)1784-456344 Fax: -466550
URLs: www.carldouglas.co.uk (boats) & www.aerowing.co.uk (riggers)


22 Feb 2007 15:55:15
Mike Sullivan
Re: Wooden boatbuilding question


"Jake" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Anybody on here ever got involved with fixing wooden rowing boats?
> I have recently purchased a badly vandal damaged 1980s cedar Stampfli
> single. An insurance writeoff. Some teenagers broke into our boathouse
> and climbed up the boat racks and thought it would be a laugh to stamp
> all over this formerly exquisite condition Swiss built sculling boat.

<shudder >

I've been really really really really really really lucky with the boats
I have stored at our boatyard in Lakeport. There have been some
thefts, but it's all been the joyride variety, or in one case, someone
stole a launch to go fishing. I've recovered everything except one
set of sculls by rowing around and checking the shoreline carefully.

If someone climbed into the yard and decided to trash all the
boats, it would prolly finish me as far as my determination
to get this thing done.

Boathouse project is lined up properly again, so it could be this
summer.

Mike




23 Feb 2007 09:14:49
Nick Suess
Re: Wooden boatbuilding question


"Mike Sullivan" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> "Jake" <[email protected]> wrote in message

>
> Boathouse project is lined up properly again, so it could be this
> summer.
>
> Mike

Please keep us posted on that, Sul. I'd love to come over and help in any
way I can, although this year I have a lot do do with the wood veneer man in
Staines.




23 Feb 2007 16:36:26
Zz Yzx
Re: Wooden boatbuilding question

You might try posting this on rec.woodworking and rec.boats.building.
They're both a knowledgeable group.

-Zz

On 22 Feb 2007 15:08:09 -0800, "Jake" <[email protected] > wrote:

>Anybody on here ever got involved with fixing wooden rowing boats?
>I have recently purchased a badly vandal damaged 1980s cedar Stampfli
>single. An insurance writeoff. Some teenagers broke into our boathouse
>and climbed up the boat racks and thought it would be a laugh to stamp
>all over this formerly exquisite condition Swiss built sculling boat.
>Although I think it can be fixed to rowable if not cosmetically
>perfect condition with great care and attention, unfortunately
>somebody has attempted a bodged repair already, making the task much
>more of a challenge. It is still correctly boat shaped and stiff in
>both longitudinal and transverse planes, apart from the 14 inch long
>crack in it. The keel amazingly has stayed in one piece and remained
>bonded to the skin throughout.
>I really should have just walked away from this but all last winter I
>coveted this boat. Training alone in the draughty boathouse, in the
>rest periods between my weights sets I would wander over to it and
>marvel at it's beauty and quality of construction, so I wouldn't like
>to think of it being cut up into bookshelves or worse.
>It throws up the following questions:
>1) Anybody know of a paint stripper type product that will dissolve
>set West epoxy (but not wood) would Nitromors do it?
>2) Where can I get a reasonably colour and grain matched vaneer in the
>UK? Are there any places you can send a sliver off to and they send
>their closest match back?
>3) Once I've got the outside shape I will eventually reinforce from
>the inside using more modern materials and epoxy. what works best with
>wood? carbon or aramid, and briefly why?
>4) Elsewhere there is a tiny dent in it. I need to fill the dent (as I
>plan to race the boat and want it fair), but don't want to leave a
>filler blotch on the woodwork. Is there such a thing as transparent,
>easily sandable filler, or some kind of workaround to fill a dent in a
>wooden boat 'invisibly'. The dent is less than 1 mm deep.
>
>Any solutions gratefully received!
> Jake