20 Dec 2005 14:44:45
Dan C.
wrist protection advice

Hello,
I need suggestions about which brand of wrist protection to purchase. I
have reviewed all of the old postings (from about four years ago) on
this newsgroup, but things have changed since then. The once-popular
No-Gomer wrist guards no longer seem to be available anywhere, and I
was wondering if anyone had any knowledge about the best brands
available today.

I have seen the Dakine wrist guards on sale, but from what I have read,
it is not a good idea to get short and stiff wrist guards like those
used by skateboarders, and the Dakine ones seem to be too short and
stiff.

Other brands available today include R.E.D., Seirus, and Biomex. Has
anyone ever tried these brands?

The website http://www.ski-injury.com/wrist.htmgives an analysis of
snowboarding wrist injuries, and recommends the Flexmeter wrist guards
(http://www.skimeter.com/ang/flex/eng_flexmeter.php).Has anyone ever
tried or heard about these wrist guards?

I have been researching this for about four weeks to no avail, so
anyone's insight is more than welcome.

Thanks,
Dan C.



20 Dec 2005 22:47:47
Bruce Chang
Re: wrist protection advice


"Dan C." <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Hello,
> I need suggestions about which brand of wrist protection to purchase. I
> have reviewed all of the old postings (from about four years ago) on
> this newsgroup, but things have changed since then. The once-popular
> No-Gomer wrist guards no longer seem to be available anywhere, and I
> was wondering if anyone had any knowledge about the best brands
> available today.
>
> I have seen the Dakine wrist guards on sale, but from what I have read,
> it is not a good idea to get short and stiff wrist guards like those
> used by skateboarders, and the Dakine ones seem to be too short and
> stiff.
>
> Other brands available today include R.E.D., Seirus, and Biomex. Has
> anyone ever tried these brands?
>
> The website http://www.ski-injury.com/wrist.htmgives an analysis of
> snowboarding wrist injuries, and recommends the Flexmeter wrist guards
> (http://www.skimeter.com/ang/flex/eng_flexmeter.php).Has anyone ever
> tried or heard about these wrist guards?
>
> I have been researching this for about four weeks to no avail, so
> anyone's insight is more than welcome.
>
> Thanks,
> Dan C.
>

I've always been a believer of "don't fall on your wrists, fall on your
elbows." No wrist guards needed.




20 Dec 2005 15:43:47
Mike T
Re: wrist protection advice

> I've always been a believer of "don't fall on your wrists, fall on your
> elbows." No wrist guards needed.

Easier said than done sometimes! My falls come in two varieties these
days - I see it coming and slide out of it on my arse or one of my hips, or
I don't see it coming and I see stars for a few seconds after landing in a
strange position. As someone who uses a computer to earn a living,
recovery from a broken forearm is preferable to a broken wrist.

Mike T






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20 Dec 2005 16:10:01
LeeD
Re: wrist protection advice

I'd use soft wrist guards, but I actually have never used any in over
250 days boarding.
G/F boarded about 130 days, uses Dakine hard style, likes 'em, but
she doesn't go cartwheeling down the hill either.
Our riding buds don't use wristguards, but they're both well over 300
days into snowboarding.
I've never hurt my wrists snowboarding.
Tennis, yes.
Golf, yes.
Skiing, definetely.



21 Dec 2005 08:43:05
Champ
Re: wrist protection advice

On Tue, 20 Dec 2005 15:43:47 -0800, "Mike T" <[email protected] >
wrote:

>> I've always been a believer of "don't fall on your wrists, fall on your
>> elbows." No wrist guards needed.
>
>Easier said than done sometimes! My falls come in two varieties these
>days - I see it coming and slide out of it on my arse or one of my hips, or
>I don't see it coming and I see stars for a few seconds after landing in a
>strange position. As someone who uses a computer to earn a living,
>recovery from a broken forearm is preferable to a broken wrist.

Two things:
1. I've never used wrist guards. But I don't ride in icy pipes and
parks either.
2. I've broken wrist, collarbone and others (motorcycle accidents)
and never had a problem with using a keyboard. Of all the occupations
I can think of, working a computer is probably the easiest to do when
injured.

So, in short - stop being a wuss :-)
--
Champ


21 Dec 2005 02:26:49
[email protected]
Re: wrist protection advice

It took me a while to break the habit of falling on my hands but I
eventually licked it. I never injured my wrists; I did notice my
triceps were taking a beating tho.



21 Dec 2005 12:57:38
Michael Matola
Re: wrist protection advice

Dan C. <[email protected] > wrote:
> The once-popular
> No-Gomer wrist guards no longer seem to be available anywhere,

I picked up a pair last year from Reliable Racing (after several
failed attempts at getting them directly from the manufacturer).

Reliable Racing's website shows them as backordered, but it never
hurts to call.

http://www.reliableracing.com/detail.cfm?edp=10922037&category=3510

--
Mike Matola


21 Dec 2005 08:07:56
Gabstar
Re: wrist protection advice

I bought some Dakine wristguards last year, and found that they rubbed
really badly between my thumb and first finger. As soon as I stopped
for lunch I took them off and never wore them again.

My boyfriend wears gloves with built in wristguards, and they seem
fairly comfortable, although I don't know how effective they are for
preventing injury.

BTW I used to do lots of judo and we spent a lot of time learning how
to fall safely. I wouldn't recommended aiming for your elbows when you
fall as you risk breaking your collar bone or dislocating your shoulder.



21 Dec 2005 08:46:55
Mike T
Re: wrist protection advice

> Two things:
> 1. I've never used wrist guards. But I don't ride in icy pipes and
> parks either.
> 2. I've broken wrist, collarbone and others (motorcycle accidents)
> and never had a problem with using a keyboard. Of all the occupations
> I can think of, working a computer is probably the easiest to do when
> injured.
>
> So, in short - stop being a wuss :-)


Harder to work on a computer while a broken wrist is healing than a broken
forearm, right?

I actually don't use wristguards all the time anymore - only when I plan to
doing park and pipe. For acrving and general freeriding I leave them off.
My main point was that sometimes falls happen so fast - like in theinstance
of an edge catch or a nose pearl - that you can't "fall well".



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21 Dec 2005 18:53:41
Champ
Re: wrist protection advice

On Wed, 21 Dec 2005 08:46:55 -0800, "Mike T" <[email protected] >
wrote:

>> Two things:
>> 1. I've never used wrist guards. But I don't ride in icy pipes and
>> parks either.
>> 2. I've broken wrist, collarbone and others (motorcycle accidents)
>> and never had a problem with using a keyboard. Of all the occupations
>> I can think of, working a computer is probably the easiest to do when
>> injured.
>>
>> So, in short - stop being a wuss :-)
>
>
>Harder to work on a computer while a broken wrist is healing than a broken
>forearm, right?

Dunno - I've never broken a forearm (I assume you mean radius or
ulner?).

But hey, I've ridden a motorcycle with my left wrist in plaster, so
working a computer is a piece of piss.
--
Champ


21 Dec 2005 18:54:18
Champ
Re: wrist protection advice

On 21 Dec 2005 02:26:49 -0800, "[email protected]"
<[email protected] > wrote:

>I did notice my triceps were taking a beating tho.

That's from pushing yourself up from a seated position, repeatedly.

--
Champ


21 Dec 2005 20:57:32
Christine
Re: wrist protection advice

On 21 Dec 2005 08:07:56 -0800, "Gabstar" <[email protected] >
wrote:

>BTW I used to do lots of judo and we spent a lot of time learning how
>to fall safely. I wouldn't recommended aiming for your elbows when you
>fall as you risk breaking your collar bone or dislocating your shoulder.

In judo they teach you to roll rather than fall. I've noticed that
that's kind of hard when you have a snowboard strapped to your feet.
But you're right, you shouldn't fall on your wrists but you shouldn't
fall you your elbows either. Better try to twist a little and fall on
your shoulder. However, you tend to fall when your're going fast down
a steep trail, you don't have much time to think.Last year I fell
going down a double diamond slope, I fell on my belly and my face
(nosebleed, lip bleeding), I went so fast I never knew what happened.
I do wear a helmet and a tail bone protector and knee protectors. My
teen kids refuse to wear any protection.

dag
Christine

--
no, I don't have a sig line.....


21 Dec 2005 11:58:44
Mike T
Re: wrist protection advice

> In judo they teach you to roll rather than fall. I've noticed that
> that's kind of hard when you have a snowboard strapped to your feet.

No martial arts experiemnce but 300-400 days of snowboarding...

I try to slide rather than roll. It's actually quite natural on most of my
carving-in-hard-boots crashes. When I crash heelside I wind up sliding on
my butt for hip; when I crash toeside I usually slide on my frontside and
forearms.

"Rolling" out of a snowboard crash in my experience is more like "bouncing"
and while it often results in me riding away after winding up back on my
board, I've torn a rotator cuff and cracked a helmet doing it. Not
recommended.

Mike T



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21 Dec 2005 21:20:39
Christine
Re: wrist protection advice

On Wed, 21 Dec 2005 11:58:44 -0800, "Mike T" <[email protected] >
wrote:

>"Rolling" out of a snowboard crash in my experience is more like "bouncing"
>and while it often results in me riding away after winding up back on my
>board, I've torn a rotator cuff and cracked a helmet doing it. Not
>recommended.

I find that most of the time you have little influence on whether you
slide or bounce or roll. I agree that sliding is better than anything
else because you don't break or stretch any limbs sliding down.
I do think that relaxing your muscles is important, whether you slide
or bounce or fly through the air.

dagdag
Christine

--
no, I don't have a sig line.....


21 Dec 2005 14:58:54
Neil Gendzwill
Re: wrist protection advice

Christine wrote:
>
> I find that most of the time you have little influence on whether you
> slide or bounce or roll.

A beginner is going to catch a lot of toeside edges and that's where the
wrist protectors are handy as the instinct is to put your hands out in
that sort of fall. Once you're past that I don't think the wrist
protectors are all that necessary, or at least I don't find them so. If
I wipe out, I typically either lose the edge and go for a slide or go
over the bars and head for a roll. Neither seems to put my wrists in
much danger, and I've yet to even tweak them in 20 years of riding.

Neil


21 Dec 2005 13:43:01
LeeD
Re: wrist protection advice

I totally agree....
Really good trick to impress your friends, and it's super easy to
do.....;
Lay into a fullpowered toeside carve dragging hands and knees, but
lean back at the apex...
Your whole unit basically pivots around your back hand, and you come
out slower, but heading in the same direction in a blink of the eye.
No wrist strain either.
Some fellow shop employee showed me this, and I just couldn't believe
how easy it was, and how it seems to defy physics.



21 Dec 2005 16:57:29
Dan C.
Re: wrist protection advice

Mike T wrote:

> I actually don't use wristguards all the time anymore - only when I plan to
> doing park and pipe. For acrving and general freeriding I leave them off.
> My main point was that sometimes falls happen so fast - like in theinstance
> of an edge catch or a nose pearl - that you can't "fall well".

I haven't had any trouble with my wrists in the past, but I would like
to start to learn to ride pipe, and I figure that it is better to be
safe than sorry.

Dan



22 Dec 2005 03:25:30
Octessence
Re: wrist protection advice

Bruce Chang wrote:

> I've always been a believer of "don't fall on your wrists, fall on your
> elbows." No wrist guards needed.

I started out wearing wrist guards (Dakine) but after a while, you do
learn to tuck everthing in and land on your elbows or back. I think that
when you are learning though, it's not a natural thing to do so wrist
guards are definately beneficial.

Octes


23 Dec 2005 16:03:27
Baka Dasai
Re: wrist protection advice

On Wed, 21 Dec 2005 18:54:18 +0000, Champ said (and I quote):
> On 21 Dec 2005 02:26:49 -0800, "[email protected]"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>I did notice my triceps were taking a beating tho.
>
> That's from pushing yourself up from a seated position, repeatedly.

Nah, it doesn't have to be repeated - I suffer from the sore triceps
thing and it can happen from just one fall onto the hands/arms. I
always get it bad in the first couple of days of the season when I tend
to overbalance on toesides and have to push myself off the snow
mid-turn.
--
What was I thinking?


25 Dec 2005 15:47:14
Bob
Re: wrist protection advice


"LeeD" <[email protected] > wrote in message news:[email protected]
> I totally agree....
> Really good trick to impress your friends, and it's super easy to
> do.....;
> Lay into a fullpowered toeside carve dragging hands and knees, but
> lean back at the apex...
> Your whole unit basically pivots around your back hand, and you come
> out slower, but heading in the same direction in a blink of the eye.
> No wrist strain either.
> Some fellow shop employee showed me this, and I just couldn't believe
> how easy it was, and how it seems to defy physics.
>

Sounds interesting, but I can't really visuallize what you are doing.
Can you explain better?

Bob



26 Dec 2005 11:45:32
LeeD
Re: wrist protection advice

Sorry, that's the best I can describe it.
Has to be done on fairly flats, so you can start the carve with a
trench 2" wide on softysetup.
Just reach you hands out, my bud does it dragging his flat forearm,
then just leans back a hair to slide the tail, and whips into a 360 as
fast as you can blink your eyes, coming out a little slower and lower
than the entry.



26 Dec 2005 15:36:47
Dan C.
Re: wrist protection advice

Maybe you can snap some pics or a vid of it next time you go out...?



26 Dec 2005 22:01:12
LeeD
Re: wrist protection advice

Need someone to be down the hill first, setup, then I can go.
What's so hard about figuring out the move? It's like I described, a
slidy 360 smack dab in the middle of a carving arc, usually done at the
bottom of the arc just before heading back up the hill.
Try it, it's surprisingly easy and you won't get hurt if you don't
hit anything.



26 Dec 2005 20:23:11
David Taylor
Re: wrist protection advice

LeeD <[email protected] > wrote on 26 Dec 2005 11:45:32 -0800:
> Sorry, that's the best I can describe it.
> Has to be done on fairly flats, so you can start the carve with a
> trench 2" wide on softysetup.
> Just reach you hands out, my bud does it dragging his flat forearm,
> then just leans back a hair to slide the tail, and whips into a 360 as
> fast as you can blink your eyes, coming out a little slower and lower
> than the entry.

Well, that makes slightly more sense, since you at least mentioned
the "360" part...

--
David Taylor


28 Dec 2005 22:31:41
LeeD
Re: wrist protection advice

Sorry about that....
I missed on the 360 on post 17, but did allude to it on 19.
Still outta whack, I haven't gone up yet with all this rain in the
Sierras and not a whole lotta snow.
Facing my first year since '93 without shop emp passes or season
tickets, I'm freakin!



31 Dec 2005 17:53:19
lonerider
Re: wrist protection advice

NoGomers are still being sold by AuClair Sports (bought the technology
from the inventors) here's a link:

http://www.reliableracing.com/detail.cfm?edp=10922037&category=3000

It's cheaper now as well!
--Arvin

Dan C. wrote:
> Hello,
> I need suggestions about which brand of wrist protection to purchase. I
> have reviewed all of the old postings (from about four years ago) on
> this newsgroup, but things have changed since then. The once-popular
> No-Gomer wrist guards no longer seem to be available anywhere, and I
> was wondering if anyone had any knowledge about the best brands
> available today.
>
> I have seen the Dakine wrist guards on sale, but from what I have read,
> it is not a good idea to get short and stiff wrist guards like those
> used by skateboarders, and the Dakine ones seem to be too short and
> stiff.
>
> Other brands available today include R.E.D., Seirus, and Biomex. Has
> anyone ever tried these brands?
>
> The website http://www.ski-injury.com/wrist.htmgives an analysis of
> snowboarding wrist injuries, and recommends the Flexmeter wrist guards
> (http://www.skimeter.com/ang/flex/eng_flexmeter.php).Has anyone ever
> tried or heard about these wrist guards?
>
> I have been researching this for about four weeks to no avail, so
> anyone's insight is more than welcome.
>
> Thanks,
> Dan C.



14 Jan 2006 01:01:06
Re: wrist protection advice

I never wore wrist guards when I was learning, and instead trained
myself to fall on fists or to just pull my arms into my body and absorb
the impact with greater surface area. However, I recently had an
accident where I basically did a cartwheel and ended up rolling my left
wrist and hurting my right one. I seriously though I fractured my left
wrist at the time though. Went out the next day to buy wrist guards.
Got some from Pro-Tect which I found at my local boardshop. Safer >
Sorry.