27 Jan 2004 06:31:55
Muggsly
Waxing a new Board?

Is it necessary to wax a new board. I have not had a new board in such a
long time I have forgotten. I will assume that I don't need to touch the
rails.


Muggsly


27 Jan 2004 14:19:31
--=Mat=--
Re: Waxing a new Board?

dont wax it man, it already is wax on it




27 Jan 2004 11:09:01
Johnny K
Re: Waxing a new Board?

i've HEARD (so don't quote me), it's more a protection wax, and not a
skiing wax.. i assume you might want to dull the contact points too?

Muggsly wrote:

> Is it necessary to wax a new board. I have not had a new board in such a
> long time I have forgotten. I will assume that I don't need to touch the
> rails.
>
>
> Muggsly
>



27 Jan 2004 16:43:55
Mike T
Re: Waxing a new Board?

> i've HEARD (so don't quote me), it's more a protection wax, and not a
> skiing wax.. i assume you might want to dull the contact points too?

It all depends on the manufacturer. I think most boards leave the
factory with a machine-wax as opposed to an iron-wax job. In my
experience such a wax job is fine for the first day out - in fact one
way to do it is to ride it for a day, which will pretty much strip off
the factory wax, and wax it yourself with your usual wax. Many people
like to hotwax several times with a new board. I've had best results
using a spring/summer wax, working a couple of coats into the base,
scraping clean each time, then applying whatever wax is appropriate for
the current conditions. Warm weather wax tends to penetrate deeper
into the pores more easily.

As far as detuning, or dulling the edges on the tip and tail, that's
personal preference. It's more widely done by freestylers than
freeriders. I don't do it, but I do bevel the base edge a bit (advanced
topic) and that makes the whole board less susceptible to edge catches.

Mike T




27 Jan 2004 19:44:49
Tóth Gábor
Re: Waxing a new Board?

what do you actually mean on bevelling the edge?
how is that done?

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"Mike T" <[email protected] > az alábbiakat írta a következő hírüzenetben:
[email protected]
> > i've HEARD (so don't quote me), it's more a protection wax, and not a
> > skiing wax.. i assume you might want to dull the contact points too?
>
> It all depends on the manufacturer. I think most boards leave the
> factory with a machine-wax as opposed to an iron-wax job. In my
> experience such a wax job is fine for the first day out - in fact one
> way to do it is to ride it for a day, which will pretty much strip off
> the factory wax, and wax it yourself with your usual wax. Many people
> like to hotwax several times with a new board. I've had best results
> using a spring/summer wax, working a couple of coats into the base,
> scraping clean each time, then applying whatever wax is appropriate for
> the current conditions. Warm weather wax tends to penetrate deeper
> into the pores more easily.
>
> As far as detuning, or dulling the edges on the tip and tail, that's
> personal preference. It's more widely done by freestylers than
> freeriders. I don't do it, but I do bevel the base edge a bit (advanced
> topic) and that makes the whole board less susceptible to edge catches.
>
> Mike T
>
>




27 Jan 2004 18:58:34
Mike T
Re: Waxing a new Board?

> what do you actually mean on bevelling the edge?
> how is that done?

Read all about it here: http://www.tognar.com/edgetips.html




28 Jan 2004 00:14:17
Mike M. Miskulin
Re: Waxing a new Board?

"Mike T" <[email protected] > wrote in news:uxyRb.1393$Xr4.734
@nwrddc03.gnilink.net:

>> what do you actually mean on bevelling the edge?
>> how is that done?
>
> Read all about it here: http://www.tognar.com/edgetips.html
>
>

Mike what base and side bevel do you use?

and anybody else that has a particular number...


28 Jan 2004 02:09:11
Mike T
Re: Waxing a new Board?

> Mike what base and side bevel do you use?

Most of my boards are 1 degree base, 1 degree side. I just did a half
degree base, 1 degree side on my new Coiler GS board, and that is
working out well too. I definitely notice the difference between no
base bevel and half degree, but I don't seem to notice any difference
between 1/2 and 1. Having any bevel at all on the base edge seems to
solve the "grabbiness" problem.

One thing about base bevels - you can't reduce the bevel without a base
grind. So if you're doing it yourself, start small. You can reduce
the side edge bevel easily if you go too far.

Warning - beveling your edges uses up some of the edge, making the edge
life shorter. For 99% of the skiing and boarding population, not a big
deal since something else goes first, but people who tune obsessively
have been known to wear the ptex thin on the base or file away too much
edge. So practice on a rock board first! I was very skittish about
edge work on my good boards for quite a while. I practiced quite a bit
on my rock board. When I did my first edge tune on a board that wasn't
beat up, I was surprised how easy it was, starting on edges that weren't
horribly dinged up!






28 Jan 2004 05:40:42
Mike M. Miskulin
Re: Waxing a new Board?

"Mike T" <[email protected] > wrote in news:bRERb.6223$p55.766
@nwrddc02.gnilink.net:

>> Mike what base and side bevel do you use?
>
> Most of my boards are 1 degree base, 1 degree side. I just did a
>half degree base, 1 degree side on my new Coiler GS board, and
>that is working out well too. I definitely notice the difference
>between no base bevel and half degree, but I don't seem to notice
>any difference

Thanks.. just got a new Donek and they come 0/0. I think I'll
start with the 1/2 and 1 and if needed go to 1/1.

I was reading the Tognar site and something there caught my eye
about using a different (greater) base bevel on the backside.
Ever try that or know anybody that has? They even go further
and talk about differences on tip/tail on each side on the
side bevels.

mike


29 Jan 2004 14:40:07
Chris Stringer
Re: Waxing a new Board?

Most boards do come with a factory wax that should last for at least a
few runs if not a day. This wax is often there just for protection
and with the amount of time the board sits around between its wax job
and they day you take it out to ride, it's often a good idea to give
it a fresh waxing. Certain companies such as Never Summer take things
up a notch and have a sticker on their boards verifying that they were
factory waxed with One Ball Jay, which in my mind means it's a better
wax job. In general though, I would say it's not a bad idea to wax a
brand new board before taking it out, as backwards as that might seem.

It's interesting that you made this post today, as my partner and I
were just discussing this last night and we are thinking of offering a
free hot wax on any new board purchases from our web site before
shipping as an incentive to sell more boards. I don't think most
people realize that the factory wax job most boards come with is not
all that great.

Chris Stringer
RDCShop.com Online Board Shop
Bend Ski and Board Sport
1009 NW Galveston
Bend, OR 97701
Email: [email protected]
Web: http://www.rdcshop.com
Toll Free Phone: 1.877.BEND.SKI