21 Feb 2007 09:37:04
mr.b
Older runners - Sound off!

Anyone in here decide to get serious about running after you turned 45 or
50? Can you briefly describe your progress curves? How fast have you
gotten? How much have you improved? Cheers


21 Feb 2007 08:24:12
tfactor
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

On Feb 21, 9:37 am, "mr.b" <[email protected] > wrote:
> Anyone in here decide to get serious about running after you turned 45 or
> 50? Can you briefly describe your progress curves? How fast have you
> gotten? How much have you improved? Cheers



I'll be 49 in a couple of weeks. I've been running consistently,
although maybe not so seriously, for less than a year. (I had a false
start more than a year ago but quickly got injured and was sidelined
for months. So I'm only counting time since I restarted and able to
run regularly). It took about two months before I was running as much
as 6 miles at a stretch. I got up to about 25 miles/week after roughly
three months.

I started racing 5Ks last fall after running for about 4 months. My
first was around 24:00 and my fastest, at least on a certified course,
was ~22:30. I think I could beat 22:00 now. I've only run one 10K and
finished in ~48:00 but I ran it more as a test and probably could have
done quite a bit better.

My sole focus at the moment is on adding and maintaining distance. I'm
planning a couple 5Ks and maybe a 10K this spring, and a half marathon
on Memorial Day. I'd like to be running 60 miles/week consistently and
comfortably by then. I'll wait until I finish the half before I make
plans for later in the year.

It's tough to start racing at this age because at the same time that
we're improving with training and experience we're also declining with
age. Someone who starts younger can see years of improvement but for
us our next personal best could well be our last. I guess people start
using WAVA % as a handicapping system but somehow that doesn't seem as
satisfying as aiming for absolute times.



21 Feb 2007 12:18:14
Miss Anne Thrope
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

Just what does 'getting serious" about jogging really mean?

Buying jogging costumes with 8 colors instead of just 5?



21 Feb 2007 11:49:26
Frank Boettcher
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 09:37:04 -0500, "mr.b" <[email protected] > wrote:

>Anyone in here decide to get serious about running after you turned 45 or
>50? Can you briefly describe your progress curves? How fast have you
>gotten? How much have you improved? Cheers


I started about 45, got serious about 55 and just turned 60.

First 5K was 33:25 about twelve years ago. Fastest 5K was last
October at 23:02.


First 10K was 58:33 about 5 years ago. Fastest was 47:38 last
December (the last 10K I ran).

initial mileage was 10-12 miles per week at about a 10-11 minute pace.

Currently running 35-38 miles per week looking to go over 40 when
weather warms up, at about a 8:45-9:15 training pace with some speed
work before races.

Lost 28 lbs in the process. No permanent injuries, but a few
temporary.

The curve is still going in the right direction. Hope it continues.

Frank


21 Feb 2007 10:01:38
tfactor
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

On Feb 21, 12:49 pm, Frank Boettcher <[email protected] > wrote:
> On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 09:37:04 -0500, "mr.b" <[email protected]> wrote:
> >Anyone in here decide to get serious about running after you turned 45 or
> >50? Can you briefly describe your progress curves? How fast have you
> >gotten? How much have you improved? Cheers
>
> I started about 45, got serious about 55 and just turned 60.
>
> First 5K was 33:25 about twelve years ago. Fastest 5K was last
> October at 23:02.
>
> First 10K was 58:33 about 5 years ago. Fastest was 47:38 last
> December (the last 10K I ran).


It's very encouraging to hear you're still improving your times.
Congrats! I'm rooting for you to continue improving.

>
> initial mileage was 10-12 miles per week at about a 10-11 minute pace.
>
> Currently running 35-38 miles per week looking to go over 40 when
> weather warms up, at about a 8:45-9:15 training pace with some speed
> work before races.
>
> Lost 28 lbs in the process. No permanent injuries, but a few
> temporary.
>
> The curve is still going in the right direction. Hope it continues.
>
> Frank




21 Feb 2007 10:48:34
Black Metal Martha
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

On Feb 21, 6:37 am, "mr.b" <[email protected] > wrote:
> Anyone in here decide to get serious about running after you turned 45 or
> 50? Can you briefly describe your progress curves? How fast have you
> gotten? How much have you improved? Cheers



I've been running off and on since the 80s. I started it up again last
October. I'll be 48 this Friday. It feels good, progress is going
well, except for a blister that hurt too much for me to run this
morning.

I'll be running a 5k this Sunday. I hope my time improves from my last
race in Dec.

Martha



21 Feb 2007 20:02:37
Dot
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

mr.b wrote:
> Anyone in here decide to get serious about running after you turned 45 or
> 50? Can you briefly describe your progress curves? How fast have you
> gotten? How much have you improved? Cheers

I first started jogging in late 1970s sometime partly to burn off some
excess morning energy so I could sit through my 8am class without
getting too fidgety. Later it was post-work jogging for stress relief -
more like 20-30 min, maybe 3 times / wk in winter. Once a year I might
run around the big block - about 40-45 min, iirc. About 6 yr ago (age 53
then, closer to 60 than 59 now), I got *really* frustrated with a
particular project and wanted to do a "little more" running for stress
relief and change of pace.

March 2, 2001, I logged my first run and began my ventures into more
"structured" running - very loose use of both terms. I started on roads
and started switching to trails that fall and now run almost exclusively
on trails. Some muscle weaknesses / imbalances and some foot/ankle
dysfunctions limited my running the first couple years until they had
been diagnosed, and PT gave me some strengthening exercises. For the
last year or so, I've been able to train fairly normally, or what passes
for normal for me.

I'm more interested in being able to run comfortably in the mountains
for hours, rather than how fast I can run whatever, although try to be
fast (loose use of term) enough to not keep volunteers and RD waiting at
end. Since I've changed races and distances most years, and the races I
have done more than once have changed their courses, times aren't really
comparable anyway.

However, distance-wise I've gone from running 40 min once a year to
running 1-1.5 hr 3-5 times/wk and long runs tend to be a few hours or so
and increasing with most of the improvement being in the last 1-2 yrs.
I've gone from barely being able to run up some hills to being able to
bound up some (the little guys anyway and at least power, rather than
slog, up the mid-size guys) and run all the hills in a 1.5 hr run on
local trail (rolling hills). I'm able to negotiate some single track
trails that used to trip me. I've gone from logging how many body parts
are swollen after even short runs to "gee, that felt good and nothing
hurts" after a couple hours. Blessed be my PT for these advances.:)

Progress is measured in different ways for different folks.;)

Dot

--
"If we reach all our goals, we are not setting them high enough."
- Matt Carpenter



21 Feb 2007 12:56:08
determined
Re: Older runners - Sound off!


"Dot" <[email protected]#duh?att.net > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> Progress is measured in different ways for different folks.;)

I really appreciate that statement. Like, "remember not to measure yourself
with someone else's yardstick".

Betsy




21 Feb 2007 15:25:50
Daniel
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 09:37:04 -0500, "mr.b" <[email protected] > wrote:

>Anyone in here decide to get serious about running after you turned 45 or
>50? Can you briefly describe your progress curves? How fast have you
>gotten? How much have you improved? Cheers

I began running at age 46 in 2004. This was my first movement for the
sake of exercise in over 25 years. I was not an athlete in high
school. During 2004, in the process of losing 12% of my body mass, I
began to think of myself as a runner. I ran a 5K "just to finish" and
started to read rec.running. I started posting in the training week
thread in August of 2004. My total in that first training week post
was 9.6 miles! (Funny -- that's more than I did last week!) I worked
up to ten to twelve miles per week the first year. In 2005 I averaged
19.3 miles per week. In 2006 (before breaking my leg) I averaged a
little over 23 miles per week, with a high of over 40 miles, and had
planned to "plateau" at around 30 miles per week.

I guess if I have any "speed" goals at all it is to stay at the back
of the front of the pack (or the front of the back of the pack) in my
age group. My 5K times went from 34:33 to 30:07 to 28:05 to 26:40 to
25:31 to 24:36 from June 2004 to July 2006. My 5K PR was being run as
a tempo workout -- the PR surprised me! So I believe I am still
"getting faster".

The biggest improvement for me is lifestyle -- keeping those 20 pounds
off, feeling good about who I am, etc. It took a certain amount of
courage for me to commit to training for and running the half-marathon
last year, a certain amount of facing and overcoming fears. Sticking
with the training means spitting in the eye of the teachers, coaches,
employers, all the nay-sayers who ever made me feel worthless.

I am now recovering from fracture of the fibula which occurred October
8, 2006. In spite of the long uphill road ahead, I do believe 2007
will be a year of continuing achievement for me.
--
Daniel ( [email protected] )

--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com



21 Feb 2007 16:04:19
Charlie Pendejo
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

Dot wrote:
> Progress is measured in different ways for different folks.;)

Paraphrasing one of your previous tag lines, eh? :-)



21 Feb 2007 20:12:02
Doug Freese
Re: Older runners - Sound off!


"mr.b" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Anyone in here decide to get serious about running after you turned 45
> or
> 50?

Started at at 40.

> Can you briefly describe your progress curves? How fast have you
> gotten? How much have you improved?

Describing what I did/do or others did will not help you. No matter
when you start you can make years of improvements. The hardest part
about starting is finding out what works for you. Start slow and have
patience.

-Doug




21 Feb 2007 20:44:34
mr.b
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 15:25:50 -0800, Daniel wrote:

> I began running at age 46 in 2004.

<snip >

> I do believe 2007 will be a
> year of continuing achievement for me. --

Good luck to you and thanks for responding. The reason I ask is two-fold.
One to start a conversation and two, to get an idea just what might be
possible for me. I'm 52, fairly lean BMI=23 and motivated. I'm averaging
22miles a week right now with a fall marathon goal. The group I run with
is populated with many hardbodies both young and old. Of approx. 150 in
the group, about 30 are Boston qualifiers for this year, and a dozen or
twenty others are previous Boston runners. It's particularly the guys and
women who are older than me who are 10-30% faster than me over distances
from 10-20km that make me wonder just what I might be able to accomplish.


21 Feb 2007 20:47:38
mr.b
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 20:02:37 +0000, Dot wrote:

> I'm more interested in being able to run comfortably in the mountains for
> hours, rather than how fast I can run whatever, although try to be fast
> (loose use of term) enough to not keep volunteers and RD waiting at end.

yeah fast is relative isn't it...they have cougars out west yes??
Grizzlies? That knowledge would keep my cadence up ;-)


21 Feb 2007 20:52:05
mr.b
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 11:49:26 -0600, Frank Boettcher wrote:


> First 10K was 58:33 about 5 years ago. Fastest was 47:38 last December
> (the last 10K I ran).

This sounds motivational. I went 1:04 in 3" of slush last week. Dry
roads might have shaved 5 or 6 minutes. This was my first race since I
was 25.


> initial mileage was 10-12 miles per week at about a 10-11 minute pace.
>
> Currently running 35-38 miles per week looking to go over 40 when weather
> warms up, at about a 8:45-9:15 training pace with some speed work before
> races.

Well I'm about halfway to your mileage and approaching your pace. My
curve looks good. Thanks for the feedback.



22 Feb 2007 01:56:55
bj
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

"mr.b" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> It's particularly the guys and
> women who are older than me who are 10-30% faster than me over distances
> from 10-20km that make me wonder just what I might be able to accomplish.

You don't know until you try.

There's a 70yr old lady who regularly leaves me in her dust & I'm only F63.
She's been running for many years & looks like going to go on for many more.
I started just a few years ago & am now slowing down each year after a
couple of years of improvement. And I was never "fast" at my best.
bj





21 Feb 2007 20:58:06
mr.b
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 08:24:12 -0800, tfactor wrote:

> I'll be 49 in a couple of weeks...

Thanks for the feedback. Sub-50 might be a nice 10k goal for me for next
year...God-willing...it will be interesting to see how things shake out in
the spring...you're right about starting late. I was a ranked swimmer as
a kid, but that ain't running and it was a _long_ time ago. I just pinch
myself every time I get back from a run these days cause you're
right...that biological clock is ticking.


22 Feb 2007 02:15:11
Dot
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

Charlie Pendejo wrote:
> Dot wrote:
>
>>Progress is measured in different ways for different folks.;)
>
>
> Paraphrasing one of your previous tag lines, eh? :-)
>

Not really - more a random thought at the time, but yea, now that you
mention it, it does sound a little familiar.;)

Dot

--
"Success is different things to different people"
-Bernd Heinrich in Racing the Antelope



21 Feb 2007 20:34:41
D Stumpus
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

I began to get serious and race after about 12 years of just easy plodding
at age 48. I had been running regularly since age 27.

At 55 I am considerably faster and stronger than I was at age 48, and still
improving.

But I am a *lot* slower than I was at age 34 :-)

My Dad started running at age 55. He ran his fastest 5k of 20:50 at age 64
(79.5% wava on only 20 miles of training/week and no speedwork). But he is
off the scale talented. He can still jog at age 85, but prefers fast
walking now. Recently he jogged back home when his car battery died.

So, yes, there is a lot of room for improvement at virtually any age you
start. The absolute numbers vary by individual, of course.



--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com



22 Feb 2007 11:57:46
Anthony
Re: Older runners - Sound off!


"D Stumpus" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> My Dad started running at age 55. He ran his fastest 5k of 20:50 at age
> 64 (79.5% wava on only 20 miles of training/week and no speedwork). But
> he is off the scale talented. He can still jog at age 85, but prefers
> fast walking now. Recently he jogged back home when his car battery died.

Now - that's good genes!!!

As we say here - "until 120"

Anthony.




22 Feb 2007 12:03:15
Anthony
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

"mr.b" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Anyone in here decide to get serious about running after you turned 45 or
> 50? Can you briefly describe your progress curves? How fast have you
> gotten? How much have you improved? Cheers

Not exactly in your age-range...

I'm 45. Started running when I was 37. First 10ks were
around 42 mins. First marathon 3:25.

Biggest improvement jump was aged 42/43 when I gradually upped
mileage to about 50/60 week and avoided any injuries.
Hit Pr's of 36:40 for 10k and 2:56 in marathon.

Have some injury issues now - but still feel there is room
for improvement.

Anthony. Jerusalem, Israel.




22 Feb 2007 12:27:42
I2Run
Re: Older runners - Sound off!


"Doug Freese" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
|
| Started at at 40.

Midlife crisis?




22 Feb 2007 12:36:25
I2Run
Re: Older runners - Sound off!


"Anthony" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
| "mr.b" <[email protected] > wrote in message
| news:[email protected]
| > Anyone in here decide to get serious about running after you turned 45
or
| > 50? Can you briefly describe your progress curves? How fast have you
| > gotten? How much have you improved? Cheers
|
| Not exactly in your age-range...
|
| I'm 45. Started running when I was 37. First 10ks were
| around 42 mins. First marathon 3:25.

You have pretty good genes as well.
I wish to get to your 'first' times for my 10K and M PRs.
I started at 39 & now 40 with 10K PR 45:09 and
one Marathon in 4 hours 7 min on a relatively tough course.




22 Feb 2007 11:34:03
Frank Boettcher
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 20:52:05 -0500, "mr.b" <[email protected] > wrote:

>On Wed, 21 Feb 2007 11:49:26 -0600, Frank Boettcher wrote:
>
>
>> First 10K was 58:33 about 5 years ago. Fastest was 47:38 last December
>> (the last 10K I ran).
>
>This sounds motivational. I went 1:04 in 3" of slush last week. Dry
>roads might have shaved 5 or 6 minutes. This was my first race since I
>was 25.
>
>
>> initial mileage was 10-12 miles per week at about a 10-11 minute pace.
>>
>> Currently running 35-38 miles per week looking to go over 40 when weather
>> warms up, at about a 8:45-9:15 training pace with some speed work before
>> races.
>
>Well I'm about halfway to your mileage and approaching your pace. My
>curve looks good. Thanks for the feedback.


Your welcome and good luck. Remember the most important factor. Do
whatever combination it is that keeps you interested and keeps you
from quitting. For some it is that next race and the excitement of
the race day events. Some like the comaraderie of club
participation. Some like the science of clothing, shoes, and
equipment. Some like to post here or on other forums. Some are in it
for the health benefits, how it makes you feel mentally and
physically. Some like to get in the "zone" and solve the world's
problems (or at least their own) as they run. Some focus on
improvement and goal setting. Most have some weighted average of all
of the above that keeps them going.

Find out what does it for you.

Frank


22 Feb 2007 13:30:30
D Stumpus
Re: Older runners - Sound off!


"Anthony" <[email protected] > wrote

> As we say here - "until 120"

I just read James Michner's "The Source", and I know exactly where you're
coming from... :-)

See you in Jerusalem,

Dan




--
Posted via a free Usenet account from http://www.teranews.com



22 Feb 2007 19:34:54
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

On Feb 21, 6:37 am, "mr.b" <[email protected] > wrote:
> Anyone in here decide to get serious about running after you turned 45 or
> 50? Can you briefly describe your progress curves? How fast have you
> gotten? How much have you improved? Cheers

I started at 42 but have not been able to really learn to run.
I keep getting injuries.



23 Feb 2007 06:12:36
rick++
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

I've been running since the 1960s and done
just about everything I've wanted to.
My modest goal is reach 50 years of
running without injury.



23 Feb 2007 07:35:48
runsrealfast
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

On Feb 23, 8:12 am, "rick++" <[email protected] > wrote:
> I've been running since the 1960s and done
> just about everything I've wanted to.
> My modest goal is reach 50 years of
> running without injury.


Wow that would be impressive, I have been running for about 14 years
and have had 3 semi-major injures and i'm not even 30 yet (one was not
caused by running, well I was actually running, but I was playing
soccer).



23 Feb 2007 07:49:48
rick++
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

Sorry, I meant "further injuries" or "running ending injury".
I've had several one-week strains and two years ago a
muliti-month knee strain. I'm no longer "invincible" as I was
before 30.



23 Feb 2007 15:55:22
I2Run
Re: Older runners - Sound off!


"runsrealfast" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
| On Feb 23, 8:12 am, "rick++" <[email protected] > wrote:

| Wow that would be impressive, I have been running for about 14 years
| and have had 3 semi-major injures and i'm not even 30 yet (one was not
| caused by running, well I was actually running, but I was playing
| soccer).

Soccer, nobody talks about it when comes to injuries.
It must have much higher % of knee injuries compared to running.
But there is so much fear about running.




23 Feb 2007 10:49:16
wully-m
Re: Older runners - Sound off!

On 21 Feb, 14:37, "mr.b" <[email protected] > wrote:
> Anyone in here decide to get serious about running after you turned 45 or
> 50? Can you briefly describe your progress curves? How fast have you
> gotten? How much have you improved? Cheers

Started serious training at age 46 but found that I was constantly
tweaking muscles, especially if I tried to do some speed training. So
it was three weeks on one week off. However I persevered and after
attending a Tony Robbins seminar was inspired to run a marathon. In
preparation, at age 47 I ran a 10k in 47.5 mins and a half marathon in
1 hr 53 min. I then got serious about my diet and really upped the
fruit and vegetables and water intake and also started taking a fruit
and vegetable suppliment called Juice Plus+. I haven't had a single
muscle tweak since which allowed me to build up some strength in my
legs. I did my first marathon in Dublin aged 48 and ran 3hr 59 min 17
secs which I was very pleased with. I'm doing my next marathon in June
in Stockholm and I'm aiming to duck below 3 hr 45 min.

I really do not believe that there needs to be any sort of serious
decline in your times until perhaps your late sixties (that is for
those of us who started late - I was a lot faster in my 20's and
30's).

If you want to follow my training programme then go to
www.marathontrainingandnutrition.blogspot.com

All the best with your training and keep us posted.



26 Feb 2007 13:10:01
Teresa Bippert-Plymate
Re: Older runners - Sound off!



mr.b wrote:
> Anyone in here decide to get serious about running after you turned 45 or
> 50? Can you briefly describe your progress curves? How fast have you
> gotten? How much have you improved? Cheers

Yes. I started running "more seriously" around 44. Up until then I would
have called myself a casual jogger. Progress over the last 5-ish years
has seen my race results (as a WAVA percentage) go from ~60% the first
year up into the high 60's and low 70's last year. Three of my real PRs
were set in 2005, but I still had one last year. I expect that if I were
to really knuckle down and train hard I'd still be setting PRs this
year also.

Teresa in AZ (just turned 50)