25 Feb 2007 14:59:22
Christos Dimitrakakis
A runner's dictionary of pain

Hello, I've recently (since last year) decided to take do my running a
bit more seriously. Up to then I had been mostly doing resistance
training at the gym. I never had any injuries to speak of, but
sometimes there was the classic day-after soreness in the muscles.

Since I started running, however, I seem to get a different kind of
soreness in my legs than what I used to get at the gym - still
muscular in origin, but seemingly emanating from a different part of
the same muscle. This is particularly the case for quadriceps - and I
cannot explain why; perhaps it is just because slightly different
parts of the quads get exercised, but I don't think that is really
possible.

Anyway, while weight training I always can tell whether any stressful
feeling is due to the muscles, simply because this is also the area
where you get the 'pump'. Anything hurting outside that area means
that there is something wrong somewhere.

Running, however, seems a bit more difficult. I occasionally find
myself starting a run and then feeling a brief discomfort/pain which
promptly goes away - this seems to be correlated with pain in other
parts of the suffering leg the next day. So, in any case, while
looking to see descriptions of other runners' pains in order to
determine whether I should be seeking a professional diagnosis or not,
I see a lot of terms, as for example 'tenderness', which I am not sure
what they are supposed to mean.

Any guesses?



25 Feb 2007 19:41:04
Charlie Pendejo
Re: A runner's dictionary of pain

Christos Dimitrakakis wrote:
> So, in any case, while
> looking to see descriptions of other runners' pains in order to
> determine whether I should be seeking a professional diagnosis or not,
> I see a lot of terms, as for example 'tenderness', which I am not sure
> what they are supposed to mean.

Yeah, this was a problem for me too - what's "sore", what's "tender",
what's normal, what's the start of an injury, what's the relationship
between what hurts and how much during a run vs. after vs.
chronically, and can I safely run if muscle X feels like Y?

I've still not developed a good sense for translating between feelings
and words - maybe someone better at it can give helpful advice. I can
just say, over time you develop a lot more feel for these things.



26 Feb 2007 00:52:49
C. Dimitrakakis
Re: A runner's dictionary of pain

On Feb 26, 4:41 am, "Charlie Pendejo" <[email protected] >
wrote:
> Christos Dimitrakakis wrote:
> > So, in any case, while
> > looking to see descriptions of other runners' pains in order to
> > determine whether I should be seeking a professional diagnosis or not,
> > I see a lot of terms, as for example 'tenderness', which I am not sure
> > what they are supposed to mean.
>
> Yeah, this was a problem for me too - what's "sore", what's "tender",
> what's normal, what's the start of an injury, what's the relationship
> between what hurts and how much during a run vs. after vs.
> chronically, and can I safely run if muscle X feels like Y?
>
> I've still not developed a good sense for translating between feelings
> and words - maybe someone better at it can give helpful advice. I can
> just say, over time you develop a lot more feel for these things.

Yeah, I guess.. so, what is 'tight'? and what is 'tender'? I never
really understood the terms, apart from when they are used for
cooking.




26 Feb 2007 04:32:40
Re: A runner's dictionary of pain

On Feb 25, 5:59 pm, "Christos Dimitrakakis" <[email protected] > wrote:
>
> Any guesses?


Use lube on your next date.



26 Feb 2007 06:23:58
Al Bundy
Re: A runner's dictionary of pain

On Feb 25, 5:59 pm, "Christos Dimitrakakis" <[email protected] > wrote:
> Hello, I've recently (since last year) decided to take do my running a
> bit more seriously. Up to then I had been mostly doing resistance
> training at the gym. I never had any injuries to speak of, but
> sometimes there was the classic day-after soreness in the muscles.
>
> Since I started running, however, I seem to get a different kind of
> soreness in my legs than what I used to get at the gym - still
> muscular in origin, but seemingly emanating from a different part of
> the same muscle. This is particularly the case for quadriceps - and I
> cannot explain why; perhaps it is just because slightly different
> parts of the quads get exercised, but I don't think that is really
> possible.
>
> Anyway, while weight training I always can tell whether any stressful
> feeling is due to the muscles, simply because this is also the area
> where you get the 'pump'. Anything hurting outside that area means
> that there is something wrong somewhere.
>
> Running, however, seems a bit more difficult. I occasionally find
> myself starting a run and then feeling a brief discomfort/pain which
> promptly goes away - this seems to be correlated with pain in other
> parts of the suffering leg the next day. So, in any case, while
> looking to see descriptions of other runners' pains in order to
> determine whether I should be seeking a professional diagnosis or not,
> I see a lot of terms, as for example 'tenderness', which I am not sure
> what they are supposed to mean.
>
> Any guesses?

I think you are overly fixated on yourself and the supposed nuances of
pain.
If you just run and enjoy it you won't feel so much pain. Who would
even give a crap about a "brief discomfort/pain which promptly goes
away"?
Yes, you do need a professional diagnosis.



26 Feb 2007 14:30:49
stevo
Re: A runner's dictionary of pain

Christos Dimitrakakis wrote:
> Hello, I've recently (since last year) decided to take do my running a
> bit more seriously. Up to then I had been mostly doing resistance
> training at the gym. I never had any injuries to speak of, but
> sometimes there was the classic day-after soreness in the muscles.
>
> Since I started running, however, I seem to get a different kind of
> soreness in my legs than what I used to get at the gym - still
> muscular in origin, but seemingly emanating from a different part of
> the same muscle. This is particularly the case for quadriceps - and I
> cannot explain why; perhaps it is just because slightly different
> parts of the quads get exercised, but I don't think that is really
> possible.

Of course it is possible, for a start, why are they called quads?


26 Feb 2007 14:47:37
I2Run
Re: A runner's dictionary of pain


"Charlie Pendejo" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
| Yeah, this was a problem for me too - what's "sore", what's "tender",
| what's normal, what's the start of an injury, what's the relationship
| between what hurts and how much during a run vs. after vs.
| chronically, and can I safely run if muscle X feels like Y?
|
| I've still not developed a good sense for translating between feelings
| and words - maybe someone better at it can give helpful advice. I can
| just say, over time you develop a lot more feel for these things.

Me too.
I can't judge between good pain and bad pain until the bad gets much worse.




26 Feb 2007 10:23:46
tfactor
Re: A runner's dictionary of pain

C. Dimitrakakis wrote:
> On Feb 26, 4:41 am, "Charlie Pendejo" <[email protected]>
> wrote:
>> Christos Dimitrakakis wrote:
>>> So, in any case, while
>>> looking to see descriptions of other runners' pains in order to
>>> determine whether I should be seeking a professional diagnosis or not,
>>> I see a lot of terms, as for example 'tenderness', which I am not sure
>>> what they are supposed to mean.
>> Yeah, this was a problem for me too - what's "sore", what's "tender",
>> what's normal, what's the start of an injury, what's the relationship
>> between what hurts and how much during a run vs. after vs.
>> chronically, and can I safely run if muscle X feels like Y?
>>
>> I've still not developed a good sense for translating between feelings
>> and words - maybe someone better at it can give helpful advice. I can
>> just say, over time you develop a lot more feel for these things.
>
> Yeah, I guess.. so, what is 'tight'? and what is 'tender'? I never
> really understood the terms, apart from when they are used for
> cooking.
>
>

"Tight" means you can't bend it. You might describe a strained muscle as
tight if the symptom was mostly stiffness or limited flexibility rather
than pain.

"Tender" means it hurts to touch it. You might describe a bruise as
tender if it didn't hurt until you poked it with your finger.

At least that's how I interpret the terms.