29 Dec 2004 15:58:25
Thebatduck
Acrylic or Steel (contact juggling)

Well, I'm going to get my first contact juggling ball from Dube.com. I'm tired
of trying to learn stuff with my juggling balls. Using real CJ equipment
should help me learn.

Having said that, what are the advantages of a steel ball verses an acrylic
ball? I'm thinking in terms of ease of use and the effect each ball gives.
Which is better?

Thanks

-master3bs


29 Dec 2004 16:26:18
Mutton
Re: Acrylic or Steel (contact juggling)

Thebatduck wrote:
> Well, I'm going to get my first contact juggling ball from Dube.com. I'm
tired
> of trying to learn stuff with my juggling balls. Using real CJ equipment
> should help me learn.
>
> Having said that, what are the advantages of a steel ball verses an acrylic
> ball? I'm thinking in terms of ease of use and the effect each ball gives.
> Which is better?
>
> Thanks
>
> -master3bs

If you get a clear acrylic ball, you can focus the suns rays through it
and burn things.

- Andrew



----== posted via www.jugglingdb.com ==----



29 Dec 2004 19:49:44
Nitesbane
Re: Acrylic or Steel (contact juggling)


"Thebatduck" <[email protected] > wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Well, I'm going to get my first contact juggling ball from Dube.com. I'm
tired
> of trying to learn stuff with my juggling balls. Using real CJ equipment
> should help me learn.
>
> Having said that, what are the advantages of a steel ball verses an
acrylic
> ball? I'm thinking in terms of ease of use and the effect each ball
gives.
> Which is better?
>


Steel will be much heavier than the same size acrylic (unless you find a
place that sells hollow steel balls), and I've found they're usually easier
for stalling. However, I find that most people learn more easily with an
acrylic; sometimes the steel balls are just too heavy for some people to do
body rolls.

Keep in mind that your first CJ ball will most likely get pretty beaten up
if you play anywhere except a room with padded walls. :-)




30 Dec 2004 00:45:52
sean_
Re: Acrylic or Steel (contact juggling)

Mutton wrote:
> Thebatduck wrote:
> > Well, I'm going to get my first contact juggling ball from Dube.com. I'm
> tired
> > of trying to learn stuff with my juggling balls. Using real CJ equipment
> > should help me learn.
> >
> > Having said that, what are the advantages of a steel ball verses an acrylic
> > ball? I'm thinking in terms of ease of use and the effect each ball
gives.
> > Which is better?
> >
> > Thanks
> >
> > -master3bs
>
> If you get a clear acrylic ball, you can focus the suns rays through it
> and burn things.
>
> - Andrew
>
>
>
> ----== posted via www.jugglingdb.com ==----

Such as your house as one unlucky CJ'er found. just make sure you store it
out of direct light or better still within a bag.

Acrylics look the best IMHO but metalic balls can look great as well. In
the UK many CJ'ers have found reasonable metal balls for 1/10th the price
of a comparable acrylic ball. They are great to learn with and you dont
mind dropping them as much. whichever you go for make sure you get a nice
size. the first acrylic I bought was too small to get any great use from
(but would of been nice in hindsight for doing multiple balls).

Best of luck whichever ball you go with.

Seán


----== posted via www.jugglingdb.com ==----



02 Jan 2005 04:42:26
Eric Bagai
Re: Acrylic or Steel (contact juggling)

> Having said that, what are the advantages of a steel ball verses an
acrylic
> ball? I'm thinking in terms of ease of use and the effect each ball
gives.
> Which is better?

"Better" is a personal decision. Dube's steel balls are almost twice the
weight of the acrylics. Much lighter (2 oz) steel balls are available
elsewhere (garden supply shops: gazing balls) but they dent easily.

With heavier balls, greater strength is required, repetitive stress injury
is more likely, and slow and more precise movement is possible.

Lighter balls require finer control and tend to move faster.

If you're really into CJ, you'll eventually get a set of everything that's
round, so your initial choice is not that critical. If price is a factor,
get what you can afford, and make it work for you.

=Eric