05 Dec 2006 14:43:23
smegger
Dead Ball problem

I have a morich colossus ball that just is not hooking like it used to, I always clean it during and after a match, I have had it resurfaced, profesionly cleaned, put out in the sun in the summer and let the oil drip off of it, bought the ebonite hook again kit (that worked great for 4 frames than died again) cleaned with hot water and sun dish cleaner and nothing seems to bring it back.
The center I use it at has not changed the way they oil the lanes or type of oil.

Any ideas to bring it back to life ? or sould I just give up and put it away ?
Thanks


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06 Dec 2006 00:56:15
amanda
Re: Dead Ball problem

how did you have it resurfaced? when i was losing hook in my Hammer
Black Widow, i put it in a sink with hot water and let it sit. I took it
out and dried it. i then used a green scuffing pad and went to work -
dry. It worked good, but not enough - so I went to the red/maroon
scuffing pad. That's better. Do it yourself. If you need more hook, try
600 grit wet sand.

and just because a center says they haven't changed their way of oiling
or oil doesn't mean their machine isn't running dry on one side or that
they didn't get a bad batch of oil.

Good luck .
smegger wrote:
> I have a morich colossus ball that just is not hooking like it used to, I always clean it during and after a match, I have had it resurfaced, profesionly cleaned, put out in the sun in the summer and let the oil drip off of it, bought the ebonite hook again kit (that worked great for 4 frames than died again) cleaned with hot water and sun dish cleaner and nothing seems to bring it back.
> The center I use it at has not changed the way they oil the lanes or type of oil.
>
> Any ideas to bring it back to life ? or sould I just give up and put it away ?
> Thanks
>
>
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> ------= Binary Usenet downloading made easy =---------
> -= Get GrabIt for free from http://www.shemes.com/ =-
>


06 Dec 2006 12:28:16
pkstore2
Re: Dead Ball problem


If sanding & re-shining doesn't work sell it. Getting balls every 6 months
is ok & expected occasionally to have a dud here & there. Many of my Storm
balls hook more now than when i got them but many of my Infernos hook less
after a season but work better since i need to throw them straighter through
the heads, get the roll, and then dont need to worry about hook since they
hit hard going up the lane vs. needing backend. Maybe keep it shiny & wait
til you get on some drier lanes?




15 Jan 2007 10:19:04
genob
Re: Dead Ball problem


I bowl a black widow and it started dying about 2 weeks ago. (I
bowled the crap out of it over the last 3 months!). I probably put 6
months of wear on it and 5 years of wear on my elbow hahaha....

I soaked it in detergent and hot water... it was amazing how dirty
and oily it was!!

After drying it out I took it back to the lanes and it hooked better.

During that time I ordered another widow and had it drilled out more
aggressively (they put a balence hole on the right side to make it
legal).

I now use my old one to shoot spares and my new one to hit strikes.

g

On Tue, 05 Dec 2006 14:43:23 GMT, "smegger" <[email protected] > wrote:

>I have a morich colossus ball that just is not hooking like it used to, I always clean it during and after a match, I have had it resurfaced, profesionly cleaned, put out in the sun in the summer and let the oil drip off of it, bought the ebonite hook again kit (that worked great for 4 frames than died again) cleaned with hot water and sun dish cleaner and nothing seems to bring it back.
>The center I use it at has not changed the way they oil the lanes or type of oil.
>
>Any ideas to bring it back to life ? or sould I just give up and put it away ?
>Thanks
>
>
>--------------= Posted using GrabIt =----------------
>------= Binary Usenet downloading made easy =---------
>-= Get GrabIt for free from http://www.shemes.com/ =-


14 Feb 2007 21:17:31
rgssd
Re: Dead Ball problem

I was thinking about getting back into bowling, so I browsed the posts
here. This one reminded me of why I quit. I bought a Zone Pro back in
99, shot 300 my first night with it and averaged about 225 for about 6
weeks before it died.

Nothing will make a ball work like out of the box again. Everytime the
ball hits the lane, the structural integrity of it is compromised.
Even if you could make the cover like new again (you can't), you can't
reverse the effects of the trauma done to the core that results from
normal use.






On 2006-12-05 09:43:23 -0500, "smegger" <[email protected] > said:

> I have a morich colossus ball that just is not hooking like it used to,
> I always clean it during and after a match, I have had it resurfaced,
> profesionly cleaned, put out in the sun in the summer and let the oil
> drip off of it, bought the ebonite hook again kit (that worked great
> for 4 frames than died again) cleaned with hot water and sun dish
> cleaner and nothing seems to bring it back.
> The center I use it at has not changed the way they oil the lanes or
> type of oil.
>
> Any ideas to bring it back to life ? or sould I just give up and put it away ?
> Thanks
>
>
> --------------= Posted using GrabIt =----------------
> ------= Binary Usenet downloading made easy =---------
> -= Get GrabIt for free from http://www.shemes.com/ =-




15 Feb 2007 01:44:45
PromptJock
Re: Dead Ball problem

> I was thinking about getting back into bowling, so I browsed the posts
> here. This one reminded me of why I quit. I bought a Zone Pro back in
> 99, shot 300 my first night with it and averaged about 225 for about 6
> weeks before it died.
>
> Nothing will make a ball work like out of the box again. Everytime the
> ball hits the lane, the structural integrity of it is compromised.
> Even if you could make the cover like new again (you can't), you can't
> reverse the effects of the trauma done to the core that results from
> normal use.

OK then, get y'self a White Dot (or similar plastic) or a "basic"
urethane as these balls DO NOT (for the most part) "degrade" like
reactives/particles. Just keep them clean (via Windex or similar) and
learn how to shoot REALLY STRAIGHT at everything!

Plus, they're loads cheaper than "power" balls.... ;)



17 Feb 2007 05:11:39
Mark
Re: Dead Ball problem

On Feb 14, 9:17 pm, rgssd <[email protected] > wrote:
> you can't
> reverse the effects of the trauma done to the core that results from
> normal use.

The core is a fairly dense object and I don't believe it will undergo
a shape change or have it's mass redistributed during normal use.

Perhaps you meant to say coverstock and not core? If not please
describe further how the core is traumatized as I'd very much like to
understand your theory.

Mark



17 Feb 2007 14:05:24
newsreader
Re: Dead Ball problem

Mark wrote:
> On Feb 14, 9:17 pm, rgssd <[email protected]> wrote:
>> you can't
>> reverse the effects of the trauma done to the core that results from
>> normal use.
>
> The core is a fairly dense object and I don't believe it will undergo
> a shape change or have it's mass redistributed during normal use.
>
> Perhaps you meant to say coverstock and not core? If not please
> describe further how the core is traumatized as I'd very much like to
> understand your theory.
>
> Mark
>
I have seen several balls split in two on the lane due to cracks
starting 'invisibly' from the inside. It happens.


17 Feb 2007 17:05:32
Mark
Re: Dead Ball problem

On Feb 17, 9:05 am, newsreader <[email protected] > wrote:

> I have seen several balls split in two on the lane due to cracks
> starting 'invisibly' from the inside. It happens.

Of course - cores separate from the shells once in a while and balls
crack and other wierdness can happen. But these are usually obvious,
are typically manufacturing defects, and are certainly not typical
causes of dead ball sydrome which is a coverstock problem.

The post I responded to seems to indicate that dead ball syndrome
(e.g. a progressive loss of reaction with use) is due to some type of
progressive change taking place in the ball core. I have never seen
any evidence of that and would like to know more as to this theory.

Cheers,

Mark



18 Feb 2007 02:42:30
litefrozen
Re: Dead Ball problem

In article <[email protected] >, smegger <[email protected]> wrote:

> I have a morich colossus ball that just is not hooking like it used to, I always clean it during and after a match, I have had it resurfaced, profesionly cleaned, put out in the sun in the summer and let the oil drip off of it, bought the ebonite hook again kit (that worked great for 4 frames than died again) cleaned with hot water and sun dish cleaner and nothing seems to bring it back.
> The center I use it at has not changed the way they oil the lanes or type of oil.
>
> Any ideas to bring it back to life ? or sould I just give up and put it away ?
> Thanks
>
>
> --------------= Posted using GrabIt =----------------
> ------= Binary Usenet downloading made easy =---------
> -= Get GrabIt for free from http://www.shemes.com/ =-
>
MoRich Product Cleaning (Updated Oct 2005)
Cleaning

First and foremost, we at MoRich strongly believe that preventative
maintenance is the key to a cover's longevity. Our recommendation is to
clean your bowling equipment after every use (practice, league, or
tournament session) with a quality ABC/WIBC approved cleaner. No matter
which cleaner you choose to use, we urge you to follow the directions
that come with the product. These companies specialize in cleaning
products and have done extensive research in bringing their products to
the marketplace.

We have received many inquires regarding the use of commercial cleaners
such as 409, Simple-Green, and Windex, to list just a few, in cleaning
our equipment. Though these products are specially formulated for
removing grease and oil components from surfaces, we DO NOT recommend
them as a cleaning product for our equipment.

Not to belabor the point, but we strongly recommend that you clean any
MoRich product (especially the aggressive coverstocks) after every use.
If a ball is used and then put away without cleaning, the oil and dirt
will have a greater chance to be absorbed deeper into the coverstock.
Whereas, if the ball is cleaned immediately after use, the oil and dirt
is limited to the surface and/or just below. We hear time and time
again from people who have lost hook in their equipment and swear they
clean it on a regular basis (often times they swear they clean it
immediately after use). Only when the question is asked (before and
after bowling?) is the real problem brought to light. Cleaning a ball
just before use is almost a useless procedure. Using any accepted
cleaner and towel will only clean a very fine layer and the deeper
trapped oil and dirt still remain. Please keep in mind that using dirty
towels only transfer dirt and oil back to the ball so please keep your
towels just as clean! Even performing a quick sanding will get a little
deeper, but won't remove the deeply rooted oil and dirt that was
neglected from the beginning.

So what to do? When this situation occurs, the cover needs a deep
cleaning of some kind to pull out as much oil and dirt from as deep as
possible without harming the coverstock. The one method we really like
is a simple "Hot Water Bath." This procedure helps to make sure that the
ball is not subjected to any extreme temperature changes that could
cause the cover to crack or separate from the core. Though the process
is easy, don't rush the steps! So here we go...

1. Have the ball wet sanded to about 400-grit to open the cover's
pores.
2. Fill a tub or bucket (5 gallon buckets work well) with hot tap
water and about 2-3 teaspoons of Dawn dish detergent.
3. Wash the ball using a wash cloth or a scotch brite pad (burgundy
or green) for a few minutes.
4. Remove the ball from the soapy water and rinse the tub (or bucket)
clean and refill it with hot water (no soap).
5. Place the ball in the water and wash it clean with a clean cloth
or new scotch brite pad. You will probably notice that a soapy film
will appear in the water. This is residue that was trapped in the
coverstock (much like the oil and dirt was).
6. Repeat steps 4 and 5 until no soapy residue remains, This make 2
or 3 times to achieve, depending upon the amount of soap that was used.
You don't want to use too much soap, but you need enough to cut through
the oil and dirt.
7. After the soap has been completely removed from the coverstock,
allow the ball to air dry at room temperature.
8. Have the ball wet sanded with 400-grit paper and then follow the
steps to bring it back to its factory finish as described in our
resurfacing section.

Once this procedure has been completed, make every attempt to clean the
ball after each session of use.

The ONE cleaning method that we strongly oppose is "baking" (or using
heat of any kind) a ball. Most of the methods that use "heat" as a
cleaning method suggest that this is a way to "revive" the ball after it
has lost an obvious amount of hook. For reviving a ball, we recommend
checking into Ebonite's "Hook Again" system. While we at MoRich have
not done much testing with it, we have heard many good things about it.
Again, check with your Pro Shop operator or the company itself.


18 Feb 2007 14:25:42
PromptJock
Re: Dead Ball problem

Pretty good information, and very sensible all-around (for the most
part).

However, I take a little issue with the line in the last paragraph,
"The ONE cleaning method that we strongly oppose is "baking" (or using
heat of any kind) a ball." This is at direct variance with the
previous instructions to:

> 2. Fill a tub or bucket (5 gallon buckets work well) with ** hot ** tap water and about 2-3 teaspoons of Dawn dish detergent.
> 4. Remove the ball from the soapy water and rinse the tub (or bucket) clean and refill it with ** hot ** water (no soap).
(the "** **" brackets are mine).

IOW, if they "oppose using heat", then they have to oppose using "hot
water", unless they're making an implied distincion between "dry" heat
(i.e. oven) and "wet" heat (hot water). If so, that distinction MUST
BE EXPLICITLY DECLARED! :)

Therefore, it appears the BEST WAY to remove "deep-seated" oil and
grunge from modern coverstocks ** IS INDEED ** to use some sort of
heat treatment, whether via "dry baking" using an oven/infra-red
lamped "Rejuvenator" or "poaching" using hot water. Both results
achieve the same results: "sweating" the absorbed oil, etc. off the
ball which is then removed with a surfacting agent (i.e. detergent),
repeating the cycles as required to ensure you get As Much As Possible
out of the cover, then some kind of surface refinishing to remove the
"track, etc." after letting the ball cool down.

That's my observations. Even though this subject will never, ever
achieve a "universally accepted" agreement among bowlers, we ALL can
definitely agree we should strive to clean our equipment after every
use to maximise its' usefulness. :)



18 Feb 2007 22:42:31
litefrozen
Re: Dead Ball problem

In article <[email protected] >, PromptJock <[email protected]> wrote:

> Pretty good information, and very sensible all-around (for the most
> part).
>
> However, I take a little issue with the line in the last paragraph,
> "The ONE cleaning method that we strongly oppose is "baking" (or using
> heat of any kind) a ball." This is at direct variance with the
> previous instructions to:
>
> > 2. Fill a tub or bucket (5 gallon buckets work well) with ** hot ** tap water and about 2-3 teaspoons of Dawn dish detergent.
> > 4. Remove the ball from the soapy water and rinse the tub (or bucket) clean and refill it with ** hot ** water (no soap).
> (the "** **" brackets are mine).
>
> IOW, if they "oppose using heat", then they have to oppose using "hot
> water", unless they're making an implied distincion between "dry" heat
> (i.e. oven) and "wet" heat (hot water). If so, that distinction MUST
> BE EXPLICITLY DECLARED! :)
>

I seen that also. I assumed they meant wet vs dry heat.

Heres Brunswick-
Prolonging the life and bringing back the reaction of Reactive and
Particle Coverstock balls.

Brunswick is currently in the first phase of testing to document changes
in ball reaction with use, and has come to the following conclusions and
recommendations that match up well with the conventional wisdom
circulating in the bowling community. Our results to date include:

€ Both Particle and Reactive coverstock balls lose some of their hooking
action with use.

€ This effect occurs faster with High-Load Particle coverstocks than
Reactive coverstocks.

€ The primary reason for the change in ball reaction is the absorption
of oil into the coverstock.

€ Brunswick¹s PowrKoil coverstock balls can be rejuvenated, to a ³like
new² condition by using the oil removal ovens found in some ProShops.

Recommendations

€ Rejuvenate High-Load Particle balls every 30-50 games.
€ Rejuvenate Reactive coverstock balls every 60-80 games.
€ Brunswick anticipates that Low-Load Particle balls will behave similar
as Reactive coverstock balls, but our testing to date hasn¹t included
Low-Load Particle coverstocks.

Since Brunswick has identified oil absorption as the primary cause of
³reduced ball reaction with use² it makes sense to use techniques that
reduce oil absorption.

€ Wipe oil from the surface of the ball between shots.

€ Use a ball cleaner to remove oil from the surface of the ball after
bowling.

Why the change in ball reaction
The absorption of oil changes the physical properties of the coverstock.
When new, your Brunswick ball has a coverstock free from oil
contamination. With use the coverstock becomes ³Coverstock + Oil². This
new, oil soaked coverstock has diminished ability to traction through
oil and create friction with the lane and diminished ability to respond
aggressively to the dry boards on the lane. Using the baking process to
remove the oil from the coverstock returns your Brunswick ball to its
original condition.

Included below is a detailed description of the testing Brunswick has
performed to date.


Test Setup
We created three pairs of bowling balls for our test:
€ Two shiny Raging Red Fuze® Reactive coverstock balls
€ Two 320-grit dull Raging Red Fuze Reactive coverstock balls
€ Two 320-grit dull Fuze Detonator High-Load Particle coverstocks balls

Each pair of bowling balls was tested and identical ball reaction was
confirmed for both balls in each of the three 2-ball pairs. One ball
from each pair was put aside as a control ball, the other becoming the
test ball. We then started accumulating games on the test balls, 1-2
hours a day, 3-4 days a week.

We checked the test balls against the control balls every 30 games on 38
foot and 50 foot smoothly blended 3/1 oil patterns laid down on both
synthetic and wood lanes.

30 games ­ No change, both Reactive and High-Load Particle test and
control ball reacted identically.

60 games ­ Little or no change in the Reactive coverstock balls. The
High-Load Particle coverstock balls showed slightly reduced hooking
action both in the mid-lane and on the back-ends requiring a 1 and 0, or
a 2 and 1 move to the outside to be lined up to strike compared to the
control ball.

90 games­ Both the Reactive and High-Load particle coverstocks showed
reduced hooking action in the mid-lane and on the back-ends requiring a
2 and 1, or a 3 and 1 move to the outside to be lined up to strike
compared to the control ball.

At this point in the test we had documented reduced ball reaction with
all the test balls. Our next step was to use the available techniques
that offered some hope of restoring the test balls back to their
original reaction characteristics.

Clean with a ball cleaner: No change in the reaction of the test balls
compared to the control balls.

Light resurfacing: 1-2 minutes with sand paper and a ball spinner.
Surface finish was returned to beginning of test condition. No change in
the reaction of the test balls compared to the control balls.

Machine resurfacing: Test balls were resurfaced with a Haas machine (25
minutes with diamond cutters): Surface finish was returned to beginning
of test condition. The first 3-5 shots looked promising, but once a
little oil was worked into the surface there was no change in the
reaction of the test balls compared to the control balls.

Pro Shop oil removal oven: Test balls were baked in the ³Rejuvenator²
oil removal oven. Oil was wiped from the surface of the ball every 10-15
minutes using ball cleaner and paper towels. Six cycles of oil removal
were required before the test balls stopped sweating out oil. After this
procedure the reaction of the test balls was identical to the reaction
of the control balls.


Non Issue: Brunswick¹s oven testing has included brand new, unused
bowling balls from all three of Brunswick¹s major coverstock families
including PowrKoil, N¹Control and Activator. In each case we have not
seen any evidence of the ³Bleeding Reactive Resin out of the coverstock²
issue that occasionally appears on internet message boards and post
competition problem solving sessions.

The removal of oil from the test balls coverstock was by far the most
effective method for rejuvenating the reaction of the test balls, and in
fact completely restored the test ball reaction to their original ³Like
New² hooking action.

At this point in the test we put the control balls away and started
accumulating additional games on the test balls. The test balls were
checked against the control balls at 30 & 60 & 90 games with results
similar to the first cycle.

At 90 games since the first rejuvenation, 180 games total, we made our
second attempt to bring back the reaction of the test balls. With our
second attempt we went directly to the oil removal process, baking the
test balls using the oil removal oven. The results were the same. The
reaction of the test balls was completely rejuvenated to a ³Like New²
ball reaction.

We are currently accumulating additional games on the test balls on our
way to a third rejuvenation cycle.

Baking & Durability
Brunswick is currently conducting a separate test on the effects of
baking and coverstock durability. This test involves creating unbaked
control balls and baked test balls, all with zero games, which are being
tested in Brunswick¹s durability testing lab.

At this time Brunswick gives a conditional approval, subject to change
based on the results of ongoing testing, to baking Brunswick bowling
balls using the Rejuvenator ovens found in some Pro Shops. Our test
balls have 180 games on them, have been baked twice and show no sign of
coverstock cracking.

Summary
After 180 games and two bakings our test balls react identically to the
control balls that have less than 10 games on them. The oil removal
baking process appears to rejuvenate the ball reaction of oil soaked
bowling balls.

Our testing to date has been with PowrKoil family Reactive and
High-Load Particle coverstocks. We anticipate similar results with the
N¹Control and Activator coverstocks families, but no testing has been
done at this time. We will report back to BTM the results of future
testing as it becomes available.

The ³Rejuvenator² oil removal oven was the method used to extract oil.
Other methods may also work. Brunswick has no opinion on other methods
at this time.


Readers of BTM should be aware that Brunswick¹s results are not
necessarily applicable to the coverstocks from other companies and that
differences in opinion between bowling ball manufactures may simply be
due to the fact that we all use different coverstock materials. In
reading and ³absorbing² the information published on this subject
Brunswick encourages BTM readers not to try and decide which company has
the correct answers, but accept the advice given by each company as the
best advice for their products.

Bill Wasserberger
Director of Research and Development
Brunswick Bowling Consumer Products