25 Apr 2006 21:16:03
max.it
Teaser




On the fourth ball of an over, the striker is deliderately obstructed
by the bowler as he is setting off for a second run, urning at the
bowlers end.
The bowler then properly breaks the bowlers wicket with the striker
out of his ground, and appeals.

1 How do you answer the appeal?
2 How many runs have been scored ?
3 who faces the next delivery ?
4 How many balls left in the over ?

max.it


26 Apr 2006 10:16:56
Marco
Re: Teaser

On Tue, 25 Apr 2006 21:16:03 GMT, max@teatime.co.uk (max.it) wrote:

>
>On the fourth ball of an over, the striker is deliderately obstructed
>by the bowler as he is setting off for a second run, urning at the
>bowlers end.
>The bowler then properly breaks the bowlers wicket with the striker
>out of his ground, and appeals.
>
>1 How do you answer the appeal?
>2 How many runs have been scored ?
>3 who faces the next delivery ?
>4 How many balls left in the over ?
>
>max.it

If I was umpiring that lot, I'd pretend I was unsighted, as I have no
idea of any of the answers except I'd imagine the batsman's not
out due to the obstruction! Maybe it's a dead ball so there's
still two left in the over? Maybe one run was scored before the
ball went dead?? If it's a dead ball, maybe the batsmen return
to their original positions...but then the run shouldn't count! Now
I'm going round in circles!!!

Nah, there's too many possibilities, I'm definitely unsighted!!!

Maybe I'l ask the umps at Sussex 2s v Young MCC at Hove
today; or those at the Rose Bowl tomorrow.

Come on Max, what's the official answer?

(PS Are you on the elite panel yet?)


26 Apr 2006 22:40:45
Andrew Dunford
Re: Teaser


"max.it" <max@teatime.co.uk > wrote in message
news:444e9051.52221535@news.btopenworld.com...
>
>
>
> On the fourth ball of an over, the striker is deliderately obstructed
> by the bowler as he is setting off for a second run, urning at the
> bowlers end.
> The bowler then properly breaks the bowlers wicket with the striker
> out of his ground, and appeals.
>
> 1 How do you answer the appeal?
> 2 How many runs have been scored ?
> 3 who faces the next delivery ?
> 4 How many balls left in the over ?

Ok, I'll give this a go, so that you can pick it to pieces and provide your
model answer.

On the obstruction taking place at the bowler's end, I call and signal dead
ball. Nothing which takes place after that is relevant, so:

1. I answer the appeal 'not out'.
2. Not sure how many runs to award, because I can't tell from your
description ("as he is setting off for a second run") whether the striker
has actually started on the second run. If he has taken a single step (out
of his crease? in the return direction of the striker's wicket?) towards the
second run, then two runs are scored, otherwise one. To which will be added
five penalty runs.
3. The batsmen decide between themselves who faces the next delivery! (I
didn't know that). So if it's Ponting & McGrath, probably Ponting.
4. Three balls still remain in the over; the fourth ball as described above
does not count towards the over and must be re-bowled.

And yes, I did have to look it all up.

Andrew






26 Apr 2006 17:05:14
max.it
Re: Teaser

On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 10:16:56 +0100, Marco <marco1044@netscape.com >
wrote:

>On Tue, 25 Apr 2006 21:16:03 GMT, max@teatime.co.uk (max.it) wrote:
>
>>
>>On the fourth ball of an over, the striker is deliderately obstructed
>>by the bowler as he is setting off for a second run, urning at the
>>bowlers end.
>>The bowler then properly breaks the bowlers wicket with the striker
>>out of his ground, and appeals.
>>
>>1 How do you answer the appeal?
>>2 How many runs have been scored ?
>>3 who faces the next delivery ?
>>4 How many balls left in the over ?
>>
>>max.it
>
>If I was umpiring that lot, I'd pretend I was unsighted, as I have no
>idea of any of the answers except I'd imagine the batsman's not
>out due to the obstruction! Maybe it's a dead ball so there's
>still two left in the over? Maybe one run was scored before the
>ball went dead?? If it's a dead ball, maybe the batsmen return
>to their original positions...but then the run shouldn't count! Now
>I'm going round in circles!!!
>
>Nah, there's too many possibilities, I'm definitely unsighted!!!
>
>Maybe I'l ask the umps at Sussex 2s v Young MCC at Hove
>today; or those at the Rose Bowl tomorrow.
>
>Come on Max, what's the official answer?

call and signal dead ball, the appeal can be ignored.
award 5 penalty runs to the batting side + 2 runs, setting off for the
second run counts as a completed run.
The batsmen decide who should face the next delivery.
The ball does not count as one for the over so 3 balls remain.

>
>(PS Are you on the elite panel yet?)

No chance of that, these juniors put me under pressure.

max.it


26 Apr 2006 17:08:26
max.it
Re: Teaser

On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 22:40:45 +1200, "Andrew Dunford"
<adunford@artifax.net > wrote:

>
>"max.it" <max@teatime.co.uk> wrote in message
>news:444e9051.52221535@news.btopenworld.com...
>>
>>
>>
>> On the fourth ball of an over, the striker is deliderately obstructed
>> by the bowler as he is setting off for a second run, urning at the
>> bowlers end.
>> The bowler then properly breaks the bowlers wicket with the striker
>> out of his ground, and appeals.
>>
>> 1 How do you answer the appeal?
>> 2 How many runs have been scored ?
>> 3 who faces the next delivery ?
>> 4 How many balls left in the over ?
>
>Ok, I'll give this a go, so that you can pick it to pieces and provide your
>model answer.
>
>On the obstruction taking place at the bowler's end, I call and signal dead
>ball. Nothing which takes place after that is relevant, so:
>
>1. I answer the appeal 'not out'.
>2. Not sure how many runs to award, because I can't tell from your
>description ("as he is setting off for a second run") whether the striker
>has actually started on the second run. If he has taken a single step (out
>of his crease? in the return direction of the striker's wicket?) towards the
>second run, then two runs are scored, otherwise one. To which will be added
>five penalty runs.

attempting a second run starts when the batsman turns and it is clear
he is attempting to run when he is obstructed.

>3. The batsmen decide between themselves who faces the next delivery! (I
>didn't know that). So if it's Ponting & McGrath, probably Ponting.
>4. Three balls still remain in the over; the fourth ball as described above
>does not count towards the over and must be re-bowled.
>
>And yes, I did have to look it all up.

it's a tricky one.

max.it

>
>Andrew



26 Apr 2006 22:20:16
max.it
Re: Teaser

On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 10:16:56 +0100, Marco <marco1044@netscape.com >
wrote:

>On Tue, 25 Apr 2006 21:16:03 GMT, max@teatime.co.uk (max.it) wrote:
>
>>
>>On the fourth ball of an over, the striker is deliderately obstructed
>>by the bowler as he is setting off for a second run, urning at the
>>bowlers end.
>>The bowler then properly breaks the bowlers wicket with the striker
>>out of his ground, and appeals.
>>
>>1 How do you answer the appeal?
>>2 How many runs have been scored ?
>>3 who faces the next delivery ?
>>4 How many balls left in the over ?
>>
>>max.it
>
>If I was umpiring that lot, I'd pretend I was unsighted, as I have no
>idea of any of the answers except I'd imagine the batsman's not
>out due to the obstruction! Maybe it's a dead ball so there's
>still two left in the over? Maybe one run was scored before the
>ball went dead?? If it's a dead ball, maybe the batsmen return
>to their original positions...but then the run shouldn't count! Now
>I'm going round in circles!!!
>
>Nah, there's too many possibilities, I'm definitely unsighted!!!
>
>Maybe I'l ask the umps at Sussex 2s v Young MCC at Hove
>today; or those at the Rose Bowl tomorrow.
>
>Come on Max, what's the official answer?
>
>(PS Are you on the elite panel yet?)


Did you ask the umpires ?
What did they say ?

Still Sussex...still Hove.
You never went away.

max.it


27 Apr 2006 15:39:57
Marco
Re: Teaser

On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 22:20:16 GMT, max@teatime.co.uk (max.it) wrote:

>
>Did you ask the umpires ?
>What did they say ?

>
>max.it

Last minute change of plan meant I was at the Rose Bowl
yesterday; play was so slow (16 runs in first hour!) that I
didn't stay too long! Too cold and miserable to go today
so no more cricket till the Oval on Sunday (weather permitting).

Your explanation is good enough for me except I'd never have
guessed the batsman could choose who was to be on-strike,
nor would I have guessed that starting a run counts as a
completed run. Is obstruction the only time that can happen?

Also would have thought ball would have counted as one of
the over.

The only thing I'd have got right is that the impeded batsman
is not out - but I guess that's obvious!!!

Shows why you're an umpire and I'm not!!!

(Did this actually ever happen or was it a theory question for
your umpire exam?)


27 Apr 2006 17:29:18
max.it
Re: Teaser

On Thu, 27 Apr 2006 15:39:57 +0100, Marco <marco1044@netscape.com >
wrote:

>On Wed, 26 Apr 2006 22:20:16 GMT, max@teatime.co.uk (max.it) wrote:
>
>>
>>Did you ask the umpires ?
>>What did they say ?
>
>>
>>max.it
>
>Last minute change of plan meant I was at the Rose Bowl
>yesterday; play was so slow (16 runs in first hour!) that I
>didn't stay too long! Too cold and miserable to go today
>so no more cricket till the Oval on Sunday (weather permitting).
>
>Your explanation is good enough for me except I'd never have
>guessed the batsman could choose who was to be on-strike,
>nor would I have guessed that starting a run counts as a
>completed run. Is obstruction the only time that can happen?

I think so.

>
>Also would have thought ball would have counted as one of
>the over.
>
>The only thing I'd have got right is that the impeded batsman
>is not out - but I guess that's obvious!!!
>
>Shows why you're an umpire and I'm not!!!
>
>(Did this actually ever happen or was it a theory question for
>your umpire exam?)

It was on the back of the association newsletter, and the correct
answer will be published in a couple of months. Though most of these
type of things did happen or nearly happened enough to get into law.

They always ask how would you signal if the ball was a noball,
and the batsman misses it so does the keeper and it goes to the rope.

max.it



27 Apr 2006 20:30:21
David North
Re: Teaser

"max.it" <max@teatime.co.uk > wrote in message
news:4450fda8.38536718@news.btopenworld.com...

> They always ask how would you signal if the ball was a noball,
> and the batsman misses it so does the keeper and it goes to the rope.

Ah - one I might have a good chance of getting right without looking it up.

You signal no-ball, byes and four, and it's scored as five no-balls.
--
David North
Email to this address will be deleted as spam
Use usenetATlaneHYPHENfarm.fsnet.co.uk




27 Apr 2006 21:08:24
max.it
Re: Teaser

On Thu, 27 Apr 2006 20:30:21 +0100, "David North"
<dnorth@abbeymanor.fsbusiness.co.uk > wrote:

>"max.it" <max@teatime.co.uk> wrote in message
>news:4450fda8.38536718@news.btopenworld.com...
>
>> They always ask how would you signal if the ball was a noball,
>> and the batsman misses it so does the keeper and it goes to the rope.
>
>Ah - one I might have a good chance of getting right without looking it up.
>
>You signal no-ball, byes and four, and it's scored as five no-balls.

That's the one, it crops up all the time under various disguises.

Here is another I haven't checked my answer for this one yet,
because I didn't read the question properly and I thought it was the
strikers wicket.

max.it

The bowler stops in his run up just before entering his delivery
stride, and throws the ball at the non strikers wicket. The non
striker is out of his ground but the ball misses the stumps.
What action are you required to take?
>--
>David North
>Email to this address will be deleted as spam
>Use usenetATlaneHYPHENfarm.fsnet.co.uk
>
>



03 May 2006 14:22:13
Sion Arrowsmith
Re: Teaser

max.it <max@teatime.co.uk > wrote:
>The bowler stops in his run up just before entering his delivery
>stride, and throws the ball at the non strikers wicket. The non
>striker is out of his ground but the ball misses the stumps.
>What action are you required to take?

Go on, what's the answer?

--
S -- siona@chiark.greenend.org.uk -- http://www.chaos.org.uk/~sion/
___ | "Frankly I have no feelings towards penguins one way or the other"
X/ | -- Arthur C. Clarke
her nu becomež se bera eadward ofdun hlęddre heafdes bęce bump bump bump


03 May 2006 17:56:17
max.it
Re: Teaser

On 03 May 2006 14:22:13 +0100 (BST), Sion Arrowsmith
<siona@chiark.greenend.org.uk > wrote:

>max.it <max@teatime.co.uk> wrote:
>>The bowler stops in his run up just before entering his delivery
>>stride, and throws the ball at the non strikers wicket. The non
>>striker is out of his ground but the ball misses the stumps.
>>What action are you required to take?
>
>Go on, what's the answer?

call and signal dead ball.

max.it
>
>--
>S -- siona@chiark.greenend.org.uk -- http://www.chaos.org.uk/~sion/
> ___ | "Frankly I have no feelings towards penguins one way or the other"
> X/ | -- Arthur C. Clarke
> her nu becomež se bera eadward ofdun hlęddre heafdes bęce bump bump bump