30 Jul 2004 23:48:39
Mike Mc
Sea Sickness

I am just about to get into sailing. However, whenever I have been on boats
in the past I have been sea sick at times. Is this something you will always
suffer from or will it go away once you get used to the motion of the boat?




31 Jul 2004 00:08:35
Peter Verdon
Re: Sea Sickness

Mike Mc wrote:

> I am just about to get into sailing. However, whenever I have been on
> boats in the past I have been sea sick at times. Is this something you
> will always suffer from or will it go away once you get used to the motion

Do you mean go away over long periods of time (eg after sailing for a few
years) or during the course of one trip?

As regards the former, I've never noticed such an affect (admittedly I don't
sail all that often, not having my own boat or a regular place on one). I
still get slightly sick about as much as I ever have (not much).

As far as the latter is concerned, then yes, very much so. On the first day
of a trip I prefer not to go below, though long enough to do some
navigation or make a brew is more or less OK. After four or five days I can
happily read a book in the forepeak, even if it's bouncy enough that I'm
occasionally fending myself off from the deck above.

It's just occurred to me that you might be talking about dinghies. I've
never known anyone be seasick in a dinghy.

Pete


31 Jul 2004 07:13:47
Keith
Re: Sea Sickness

In message <ceekdk$o4k$1@wisteria.csv.warwick.ac.uk >, Peter Verdon
<news@verdonet.organisation.unitedkingdom > writes
>Mike Mc wrote:
>
>> I am just about to get into sailing. However, whenever I have been on
>> boats in the past I have been sea sick at times. Is this something you
>> will always suffer from or will it go away once you get used to the motion
>
>Do you mean go away over long periods of time (eg after sailing for a few
>years) or during the course of one trip?
>
>As regards the former, I've never noticed such an affect (admittedly I don't
>sail all that often, not having my own boat or a regular place on one). I
>still get slightly sick about as much as I ever have (not much).
>
>As far as the latter is concerned, then yes, very much so. On the first day
>of a trip I prefer not to go below, though long enough to do some
>navigation or make a brew is more or less OK. After four or five days I can
>happily read a book in the forepeak, even if it's bouncy enough that I'm
>occasionally fending myself off from the deck above.
>
>It's just occurred to me that you might be talking about dinghies. I've
>never known anyone be seasick in a dinghy.
>
On this subject - someone mentioned in a previous thread a prescriptive
item which is allegedly very effective. I cannot find the reference -
can someone please repeat the information.

TIA
--
Keith replace nospam with ilf0rd


31 Jul 2004 09:07:04
TB
Re: Sea Sickness

> It's just occurred to me that you might be talking about dinghies. I've
> never known anyone be seasick in a dinghy.


What!! I was sick as a dog on my first dinghy trip off Seasalter in the
long race to Fowey island. I couldn't help crew the dinghy ( a Mirror) and
just lay in the bottom of the boat wanting to die, despite the threats,
curses and kicks from the skipper.

After that, with little faith, I used Kwells and they worked a treat. I left
them off after some years but some 30 years after the initial incident I
again felt queasy in a Wayfarer off Brancaster.

Surely I'm not the only one to have been sick in a dinghy??

TonyB




31 Jul 2004 14:50:18
Stefan Lloyd
Re: Sea Sickness

"Mike Mc" <news@REMOVETHISBITamateur-astronomer.ANDTHIScom > wrote in message
news:r7BOc.615$9S5.170@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
> I am just about to get into sailing. However, whenever I have been on
boats
> in the past I have been sea sick at times. Is this something you will
always
> suffer from or will it go away once you get used to the motion of the
boat?

I am less prone to sea-sickness if I've done a lot of offshore sailing in
the previous few months. Most people who are sea-sick cease to be so after a
few days at sea but for some unfortunates that does not apply.

You may also find that you learn strategies to reduce the risk. Personally I
never feel ill inshore (Solent) but can feel sick offshore. I've only
actually been sick a couple of times in 20 years sailing but I've felt sick
quite often. These work for me:

1/ Take Stugeron. Some people have side effects: I don't, apart from a dry
mouth.
2/ When going off-watch and getting undressed, stow clothing carefully so
you can find it again. There is nothing more sick-inducing than searching in
the dark for that boot which slid across the boat in the last tack.
3/ Once you are dressed get out into the open air fast. Getting hot down
below in oilskins is very sick-inducing.
4 Make up sandwiches before it gets rough, so if nobody feels like cooking
there is still something to eat.

Hope that helps.




01 Aug 2004 08:45:59
John Allan
Re: Sea Sickness

In article <ceekdk$o4k$1@wisteria.csv.warwick.ac.uk >,
news@verdonet.organisation.unitedkingdom says...
> Mike Mc wrote:
>
> > I am just about to get into sailing. However, whenever I have been on
> > boats in the past I have been sea sick at times. Is this something you
> > will always suffer from or will it go away once you get used to the motion
>
> Do you mean go away over long periods of time (eg after sailing for a few
> years) or during the course of one trip?
>
> As regards the former, I've never noticed such an affect (admittedly I don't
> sail all that often, not having my own boat or a regular place on one). I
> still get slightly sick about as much as I ever have (not much).

There may be two timeframes here.

If OP is asking whether "once you get used to the motion" after going
sailing offshore a few times, then never again get seasick, the answer is
probably no. However, you _do_ get more experienced at looking after
yourself and avoiding the causes of seasickness: eating/drinking wrong
things before sailing or while sailing, getting cold, sticking head in
the bilge, thinking about getting sick etc etc, and you can also get the
right drugs, patches, wristbands etc etc.

OTOH, somewhere between 'cured for life' and the 'getting used to it
after the first few days' as Peter describes below, some people find that
after being ashore for some time, like over winter, it takes them a month
or two of weekend sailing to 'get their sealegs back'.
>
> As far as the latter is concerned, then yes, very much so. On the first day
> of a trip I prefer not to go below, though long enough to do some
> navigation or make a brew is more or less OK. After four or five days I can
> happily read a book in the forepeak, even if it's bouncy enough that I'm
> occasionally fending myself off from the deck above.

If you already know you're prone, DO get the drugs, take them before you
go and have a good time: unless you're one of the few people who suffer
acutely, it can be controlled, and most people can find drugs or other
aids that don't have side-effects. Once you get a bit of experience, you
can fine tune whatever you take or do.

John



01 Aug 2004 07:32:59
Keith
Re: Sea Sickness

In message <ceg81b$a01$1$830fa17d@news.demon.co.uk >, Stefan Lloyd
<dont@spam.me > writes
>
>1/ Take Stugeron. Some people have side effects: I don't, apart from a dry
>mouth.
>
Is Stugeron OTC or prescriptive?
--
Keith replace nospam with ilf0rd


01 Aug 2004 08:45:01
Ken McCulloch
Re: Sea Sickness

Mike Mc <news@REMOVETHISBITamateur-astronomer.ANDTHIScom > wrote:

> I am just about to get into sailing. However, whenever I have been on boats
> in the past I have been sea sick at times. Is this something you will always
> suffer from or will it go away once you get used to the motion of the boat?

not very helpful I know, but the best cure for seasickness is said to be
to go and sit under a tree ;-)
--
Ken McCulloch
Edinburgh


01 Aug 2004 12:38:55
Tony of Judicious
Re: Sea Sickness

Keith wrote:

> In message <ceg81b$a01$1$830fa17d@news.demon.co.uk>, Stefan Lloyd
> <dont@spam.me> writes
>>
>>1/ Take Stugeron. Some people have side effects: I don't, apart from a dry
>>mouth.
>>
> Is Stugeron OTC or prescriptive?

OTC

I quite often feel queasy at the start of the season, or if I have not been
sailing for some time. Compared to some though I am quite lucky - I feel
bad, then very bad, puke, OK - usually takes about 5 mins.

A while back I was on an extended passage with a crew who was desparately
ill - took to his bunk, was vomiting brown bile, shivering, incapable of
anything. I put him on re-hydration therapy. We were a long way from land
and after 24 hours I put out a 'pan medico'. Took 12hrs until we were
within range of a coastal radio station who patched me through to the local
hospital and I could talk to a MO (this was at 03.00 which must have made
his day). Recovered quickly when we got to land.

i now take a stugeron if I think it is going to be bumpy and rolly-polly.
BTW the guy above was quite OK after that on Stugeron.


01 Aug 2004 14:05:18
Peter Verdon
Re: Sea Sickness

Stefan Lloyd wrote:

> 2/ When going off-watch and getting undressed, stow clothing carefully so
> you can find it again. There is nothing more sick-inducing than searching
> in the dark for that boot which slid across the boat in the last tack.
> 3/ Once you are dressed get out into the open air fast. Getting hot down
> below in oilskins is very sick-inducing.

Seconded.

Pete


01 Aug 2004 17:21:14
Richard Herring
Re: Sea Sickness

In article <85pYIkAbizCBFwb2@ilf0rd.demon.co.uk >, Keith
<keith@nospam.demon.co.uk > wrote
>In message <ceekdk$o4k$1@wisteria.csv.warwick.ac.uk>, Peter Verdon
><news@verdonet.organisation.unitedkingdom> writes
>>Mike Mc wrote:
>>
>>> I am just about to get into sailing. However, whenever I have been on
>>> boats in the past I have been sea sick at times. Is this something you
>>> will always suffer from or will it go away once you get used to the motion
>>
>>Do you mean go away over long periods of time (eg after sailing for a few
>>years) or during the course of one trip?
>>
>>As regards the former, I've never noticed such an affect (admittedly I don't
>>sail all that often, not having my own boat or a regular place on one). I
>>still get slightly sick about as much as I ever have (not much).
>>
>>As far as the latter is concerned, then yes, very much so. On the first day
>>of a trip I prefer not to go below, though long enough to do some
>>navigation or make a brew is more or less OK. After four or five days I can
>>happily read a book in the forepeak, even if it's bouncy enough that I'm
>>occasionally fending myself off from the deck above.
>>
>>It's just occurred to me that you might be talking about dinghies. I've
>>never known anyone be seasick in a dinghy.
>>
>On this subject - someone mentioned in a previous thread a prescriptive
>item which is allegedly very effective. I cannot find the reference -
>can someone please repeat the information.

A tree?

--
Richard Herring <mailto:richard@clupeid.demon.co.uk >


01 Aug 2004 19:18:56
martin
Re: Sea Sickness

On Sun, 1 Aug 2004 17:21:14 +0100, Richard Herring
<news00@clupeid.demon.co.uk > wrote:

>In article <85pYIkAbizCBFwb2@ilf0rd.demon.co.uk>, Keith
><keith@nospam.demon.co.uk> wrote

>>On this subject - someone mentioned in a previous thread a prescriptive
>>item which is allegedly very effective. I cannot find the reference -
>>can someone please repeat the information.
>
>A tree?

A red herring shirley? ;-)
--
Martin


02 Aug 2004 07:58:35
Peter
Re: Sea Sickness

On Sun, 01 Aug 2004 12:38:55 +0100, Tony of Judicious
<tony@deletethis.thoward.plus.com > wrote:

>Keith wrote:
>
>> In message <ceg81b$a01$1$830fa17d@news.demon.co.uk>, Stefan Lloyd
>> <dont@spam.me> writes
>>>
>>>1/ Take Stugeron. Some people have side effects: I don't, apart from a dry
>>>mouth.
>>>
>> Is Stugeron OTC or prescriptive?
>
>OTC
>
>I quite often feel queasy at the start of the season, or if I have not been
>sailing for some time. Compared to some though I am quite lucky - I feel
>bad, then very bad, puke, OK - usually takes about 5 mins.
>
>A while back I was on an extended passage with a crew who was desparately
>ill - took to his bunk, was vomiting brown bile, shivering, incapable of
>anything. I put him on re-hydration therapy. We were a long way from land
>and after 24 hours I put out a 'pan medico'. Took 12hrs until we were
>within range of a coastal radio station who patched me through to the local
>hospital and I could talk to a MO (this was at 03.00 which must have made
>his day). Recovered quickly when we got to land.
>
>i now take a stugeron if I think it is going to be bumpy and rolly-polly.
>BTW the guy above was quite OK after that on Stugeron.

Stugeron is by far the best we've seen - but not available down here
in Oz.

Like many yachties here, whenever we come back to the UK, we stock up
big time, both for our boat and others. Buying 20 packs in Boots
raises the odd eyebrow.

Only once have we had any hassel from Customs - I was just starting
to get a hard time from this Customs guy when another came over and
asked "You sail?". When i said yes, he told the other other guy to
get off my back and let me through.

Seriously, if you get sick, take preventative action sooner rather
than later. We too had someone very ill offshore once - no point in
treating by mouth, they couldn't keep anything down - but I never want
to have to apply a suppository again.

btw, there are actually three stages of seasickness.

1. feeling awful, neasea, vomiting, the works.

2. feeling even worse, you start to be afraid that you might even die.

3. feeling that bad, you're scared you're not going to die.

Peter

www.oceanodyssey.net

Peter & Jean looking for sponsors for the Melbourne-Osaka in 2007, and
promising we will get round to updating our website this year.

"Do not measure your life by the number of breaths you take,
Rather by the number of times life just takes your breath away"


02 Aug 2004 07:44:54
Keith
Re: Sea Sickness

In message <410cd659$0$25120$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net >, Tony
of Judicious <tony@deletethis.thoward.plus.com > writes
>Keith wrote:
>
>>>
>> Is Stugeron OTC or prescriptive?
>
>OTC
>
>I quite often feel queasy at the start of the season, or if I have not been
>sailing for some time. Compared to some though I am quite lucky - I feel
>bad, then very bad, puke, OK - usually takes about 5 mins.
>
>A while back I was on an extended passage with a crew who was desparately
>ill - took to his bunk, was vomiting brown bile, shivering, incapable of
>anything. I put him on re-hydration therapy. We were a long way from land
>and after 24 hours I put out a 'pan medico'. Took 12hrs until we were
>within range of a coastal radio station who patched me through to the local
>hospital and I could talk to a MO (this was at 03.00 which must have made
>his day). Recovered quickly when we got to land.
>
>i now take a stugeron if I think it is going to be bumpy and rolly-polly.
>BTW the guy above was quite OK after that on Stugeron.

Thanks for that.

--
Keith replace nospam with ilf0rd


02 Aug 2004 15:11:11
tarquinlinbin
Re: Sea Sickness

On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 23:48:39 GMT, "Mike Mc"
<news@REMOVETHISBITamateur-astronomer.ANDTHIScom > wrote:

>I am just about to get into sailing. However, whenever I have been on boats
>in the past I have been sea sick at times. Is this something you will always
>suffer from or will it go away once you get used to the motion of the boat?
>
I beleive you can now buy stick on patches (like anti smoking
patches). This should be very useful as Stugeron pills are of no use
unless you take them well in advance. If you take them when your
feeling queasy,chances are you;ll throw them up.
Change the 900 to 670 in the return email address to reply


02 Aug 2004 16:56:29
Ayesha
Re: Sea Sickness

tarquinlinbin <bra900@hotmail.com > wrote:

> On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 23:48:39 GMT, "Mike Mc"
> <news@REMOVETHISBITamateur-astronomer.ANDTHIScom> wrote:
>
> >I am just about to get into sailing. However, whenever I have been on boats
> >in the past I have been sea sick at times. Is this something you will always
> >suffer from or will it go away once you get used to the motion of the boat?
> >
> I beleive you can now buy stick on patches (like anti smoking
> patches). This should be very useful as Stugeron pills are of no use
> unless you take them well in advance. If you take them when your
> feeling queasy,chances are you;ll throw them up.
> Change the 900 to 670 in the return email address to reply

Has anyone bought these patches over the counter in the UK yet, or are
they still prescription only? I notice the Novartis web site ( the
manufactuers) says they are available at Boots. I haven't tried yet.


02 Aug 2004 18:15:30
Stefan
Re: Sea Sickness

In article <9qisg0ddc44f261rfj5fqp6lpp78h6685a@4ax.com >, bra900
@hotmail.com says...
> On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 23:48:39 GMT, "Mike Mc"
> <news@REMOVETHISBITamateur-astronomer.ANDTHIScom> wrote:
>
> >I am just about to get into sailing. However, whenever I have been on boats
> >in the past I have been sea sick at times. Is this something you will always
> >suffer from or will it go away once you get used to the motion of the boat?
> >
> I beleive you can now buy stick on patches (like anti smoking
> patches). This should be very useful as Stugeron pills are of no use
> unless you take them well in advance.

Quite true, but I've seen information that implies the patches have to
be used in advance as well. Anybody know?


02 Aug 2004 21:00:53
Dave Bullar
Re: Sea Sickness


"Tony of Judicious" <tony@deletethis.thoward.plus.com > wrote in message
news:410cd659$0$25120$ed2619ec@ptn-nntp-reader01.plus.net...
> Keith wrote:
>
> >>1/ Take Stugeron. Some people have side effects: I don't, apart from a
dry
> >>mouth.
> >>
> > Is Stugeron OTC or prescriptive?
>
> OTC
>
> I quite often feel queasy at the start of the season, or if I have not
been
> sailing for some time. Compared to some though I am quite lucky - I feel
> bad, then very bad, puke, OK - usually takes about 5 mins.
>
> A while back I was on an extended passage with a crew who was desparately
> ill - took to his bunk, was vomiting brown bile, shivering, incapable of
> anything. I put him on re-hydration therapy. We were a long way from land
> and after 24 hours I put out a 'pan medico'. Took 12hrs until we were
> within range of a coastal radio station who patched me through to the
local
> hospital and I could talk to a MO (this was at 03.00 which must have made
> his day). Recovered quickly when we got to land.
>
> i now take a stugeron if I think it is going to be bumpy and rolly-polly.
> BTW the guy above was quite OK after that on Stugeron.

I totally agree with Tony.

I have been sailing over 50 years and I still take a couple of stugeron on
the first two or three days of a sailing trip. But I am sure that confidence
and a lack of anxiety helps a lot.
I largely got over seasickness when I got a vessel that I felt was stronger
at sea than me.
I used to take watercress and dry biscuits but I suspect theywere really
placebos.

Dave




03 Aug 2004 00:21:56
BHBH
Re: Sea Sickness

Stugeron Stugeron Stugeron Stugeron.... Is the best. What more can I say.
So I will.... FOR ME No side effects..... only reaction was to enjoy my
trip sailing down the East Coast of Australia.

Used 75mg but now have 15mg for my next trip.
Purchased from http://www.expresschemist.co.uk/product_3507_STU7H.html

Regards from one happy sailor.

Geoff




03 Aug 2004 17:14:42
Peter
Re: Sea Sickness

On Tue, 03 Aug 2004 00:21:56 GMT, "BHBH" <geoff@brighthikers.com.au >
wrote:

>Stugeron Stugeron Stugeron Stugeron.... Is the best. What more can I say.
> So I will.... FOR ME No side effects..... only reaction was to enjoy my
>trip sailing down the East Coast of Australia.
>
>Used 75mg but now have 15mg for my next trip.
>Purchased from http://www.expresschemist.co.uk/product_3507_STU7H.html
>
>Regards from one happy sailor.
>
>Geoff
>

Geoff,

We're going over to the UK for Xmas and the Boat Show.

If your're in Melbourne, we'll get some Stuggie for you.

Peter

www.oceanodyssey.net

Peter & Jean looking for sponsors for the Melbourne-Osaka in 2007, and
promising we will get round to updating our website this year.

"Do not measure your life by the number of breaths you take,
Rather by the number of times life just takes your breath away"


02 Aug 2004 22:35:48
Duncan Heenan
Re: Sea Sickness


"Stefan" <dont@spam.me > wrote in message
news:celsps$35g$1$8302bc10@news.demon.co.uk...
> In article <9qisg0ddc44f261rfj5fqp6lpp78h6685a@4ax.com>, bra900
> @hotmail.com says...
> > On Fri, 30 Jul 2004 23:48:39 GMT, "Mike Mc"
> > <news@REMOVETHISBITamateur-astronomer.ANDTHIScom> wrote:
> >
> > >I am just about to get into sailing. However, whenever I have been on
boats
> > >in the past I have been sea sick at times. Is this something you will
always
> > >suffer from or will it go away once you get used to the motion of the
boat?
> > >
> > I beleive you can now buy stick on patches (like anti smoking
> > patches). This should be very useful as Stugeron pills are of no use
> > unless you take them well in advance.
>
> Quite true, but I've seen information that implies the patches have to
> be used in advance as well. Anybody know?

I don't know about patches, but I'm not a fan of Stugeron. It suits a lot of
people but not everyone, and I find the most effective ones for me are the
bromine based ones such as Boots own brand and Kwells. I also have a battery
operated 'Relief Band' which was expensive (about 70), but works (not
waterproof though). Susceptibility to sea sickness does decrease the more
sailing you do, and the older you get. But it also depends a ,lot of how you
manage it e.g. stay on deck as much as possible, time on the helm is good,
don't get too tired or hungry or cold, don't let yourself be nervous, don't
eat dodgy foods before you sail (e.g. greasy or acid stuff & chocolate, and
avoid alcohol).




03 Aug 2004 18:59:10
fragged
Re: Sea Sickness

two pieces of selotape 12inches long stuck in a cross over your belly button
using the button as the center.
Reported to work like a charm.

fragged

"Mike Mc" <news@REMOVETHISBITamateur-astronomer.ANDTHIScom > wrote in message
news:r7BOc.615$9S5.170@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
>I am just about to get into sailing. However, whenever I have been on boats
> in the past I have been sea sick at times. Is this something you will
> always
> suffer from or will it go away once you get used to the motion of the
> boat?
>
>




04 Aug 2004 12:46:11
BHBH
Re: Sea Sickness

Hi Peter,
Thanks for the offer.
I'm right for it at present.... stocked up for future.
I am located in Bright...."a ways" from the ocean !
Trying to sell my business to go sailing.
Enjoy your trip back to pommieland at xmas...... brrr brrr brrr

I will look out for you on the horizon

Geoff





15 Aug 2004 08:16:22
Nicky Shaw
Re: Sea Sickness

As some one who has been sea sick most of his life I have the following
suggestions:

1) Eat ginger biscuits (They are said to settle the stomach) and taste good
any way..
2) Stugerons / other travel pills can help but you can associate them with
seasickness hence feel sick! (Not just me I know of others...Also see point
7)
3) Keep Busy steer, trim a sail, repair a sail, whip a rope, peel potatoes,
go below to sleep, cook etc but don't just sit and feel ill...
4) Some people say you can not be sea sick lying down (I never have been)
but don't lie back and die, try and stand your watch (bucket in hand) or you
might as well not be there...
5) Eat and drink (water or soft drinks ok maybe a little alcohol but not to
much) keep your stomach full or at least don't let it get MT its horrible
retching up your stomach lining (Its about then I wish I am going to die!) .
I like Pot Noodles if its rough and someone puts the kettle on I have one
instead of tea or coffee! Have lots of sandwiches on standby... Take your
own secret supplies if you don't know who you are sailing with..
6) Sea bands do work but for some people, how well is up to you see the last
point below.
7) Anxiety/ Mental sea sickness in my opinion (I know they are like A holes,
every bodies got one and no one wants to see any one else's) is the route
cause of 90% of sea sickness.

It is natural, you are in a new place or one seldom visited you are
worried, is the weather going to be good, are the seas going to be big, is
the repaired mainsail going to hold, should we have more fuel the list is
endless...

How often do people feel sick just as it gets dark, they loose sight of
land, the last buoy in the channel is passed the list is endless??

On one occasion sailing with a very vain friend who started getting sea sick
(her fast small boat passage at sea) on passing the last buoy in the channel
I gave her a pint of water & some sandwiches. Then got out a camera and
told her I would photograph the next person who was sea sick... After that
she started to feel better so did every one else and we had a very pleasant
trip, she never really forgave me though. She also has never been sea sick
since!

There is NO EASY cure for this reduce your anxiety, easier said than done...

Ginger biscuits still ease the stomach, keeping busy stops you thinking
about it, eating and drinking are always good!


Gerrit Shaw

I've been to busy sailing all my life than to learn to write or spell,

>or indeed to use correct grammar.

PS Be Careful which tree you sit under I understand some cruise liners have
trees on!!
PPS Mars milk has a usefull trick of tasting the same coming out as it did
going in...




15 Aug 2004 08:54:36
Stefan
Re: Sea Sickness

In article <qZETc.41$x1.10@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net >, nicky.shaw@tesco.net
says...

> 4) Some people say you can not be sea sick lying down (I never have been)
> but don't lie back and die, try and stand your watch (bucket in hand) or you
> might as well not be there...

I have seen several people lying down and still being sick.

I've heard it claimed you cannot be sick while helming, but I can say
from one memorable personal experience that isn't true either.


15 Aug 2004 10:14:18
martin
Re: Sea Sickness

On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 08:54:36 +0100, Stefan <dont@spam.me > wrote:

>In article <qZETc.41$x1.10@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net>, nicky.shaw@tesco.net
>says...
>
>> 4) Some people say you can not be sea sick lying down (I never have been)
>> but don't lie back and die, try and stand your watch (bucket in hand) or you
>> might as well not be there...
>
>I have seen several people lying down and still being sick.

especially around closing time.
--
Martin


16 Aug 2004 07:10:21
SKMonel
Re: Sea Sickness

On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 08:16:22 GMT, "Nicky Shaw" <nicky.shaw@tesco.net >
wrote:

>As some one who has been sea sick most of his life I have the following
>suggestions:
>
>1) Eat ginger biscuits (They are said to settle the stomach) and taste good
>any way..

I _was_ a great believer in this remedy. I have eaten them all the
time while at sea. I have only ever felt queazy once and that was when
I was in the forecabin packing away sails in an F7 while on a race in
the Pacific.

Two years ago our club set off on a cruise to the Baltic, leaving from
the Orwell. One of our skippers had two daughters that he lent to each
of the boats sailing singlehanded. The younger was well known for her
sea sickness so I gave her a packet of ginger biscuits and assured her
they would work- she was on another boat. As crew, I had the older and
more experienced daughter who had never been sick in her life. About
two hours out, my crew threw up for the first time. I told her that
was a once in a lifetime experience, made her a cup of tea and gave
her some gingernuts. Half an hour later she threw up again. As it
turned out the whole crossing was her either in her bunk or in the
cockpit throwing up. The crew I had is a serious scientist and decided
to analyse the ginger biscuits - it turns out less than 1% ginger.
Both those girls refuse to ever have a ginger biscuit again -
unfortunately they now associate them with throwing up.

Ginger is known for its ability to combat seasickness. I keep on board
crystalised ginger, for any one who might be sick.

all the best,

SK




16 Aug 2004 11:12:18
Duncan Heenan
Re: Sea Sickness


"SKMonel" <dontbother@nowhere.com > wrote in message
news:vrm0i0tthpc43o8qvohas4laugmokdf2eq@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 08:16:22 GMT, "Nicky Shaw" <nicky.shaw@tesco.net>
> wrote:
>
> >As some one who has been sea sick most of his life I have the following
> >suggestions:
> >
> >1) Eat ginger biscuits (They are said to settle the stomach) and taste
good
> >any way..
>
> I _was_ a great believer in this remedy. I have eaten them all the
> time while at sea. I have only ever felt queazy once and that was when
> I was in the forecabin packing away sails in an F7 while on a race in
> the Pacific.
>
> Two years ago our club set off on a cruise to the Baltic, leaving from
> the Orwell. One of our skippers had two daughters that he lent to each
> of the boats sailing singlehanded. The younger was well known for her
> sea sickness so I gave her a packet of ginger biscuits and assured her
> they would work- she was on another boat. As crew, I had the older and
> more experienced daughter who had never been sick in her life. About
> two hours out, my crew threw up for the first time. I told her that
> was a once in a lifetime experience, made her a cup of tea and gave
> her some gingernuts. Half an hour later she threw up again. As it
> turned out the whole crossing was her either in her bunk or in the
> cockpit throwing up. The crew I had is a serious scientist and decided
> to analyse the ginger biscuits - it turns out less than 1% ginger.
> Both those girls refuse to ever have a ginger biscuit again -
> unfortunately they now associate them with throwing up.
>
> Ginger is known for its ability to combat seasickness. I keep on board
> crystalised ginger, for any one who might be sick.
>
> all the best,
>
> SK
>
>

I'd agree with that. I eat ginger biscuits and they do help.




16 Aug 2004 20:56:33
Arwen Lune
Re: Sea Sickness

In article <qZETc.41$x1.10@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net >, Nicky Shaw
proclaimed...

> 5) Eat and drink

I was declared insane when I tucked into cooked lunch when the sea
got a bit bumpy, but the idea was 'If I'm going to be sick at least
I'll have something to toss up' and it worked for me - settled my
stomach! I find I get quesy easier on an empty stomach? Strange but
true. I was a bit uneasy at times that day but only when thinking
of it, as long as I kept active there was no problem at all.

I admit there's times I have had to force myself to eat though, and
those are usually the times I need it most!

I don't know if ginger biscuits work but they taste good, so...

Cheers,
Arwen (still considering the Biscay in December..!)

--
Look, if I could make one thing perfectly clear,
then believe me I would.


20 Aug 2004 20:59:51
Gordon Wedman
Re: Sea Sickness

Good advice and I agree with the anxiety comment. Just being afraid can
upset your stomach let alone being on a rocking boat. For this reason I
think its important for the skipper to reassure the crew and always be
positive.

I've heard that lying down on the cabin sole and closing the eyes can make
one feel better. Less motion down low and having the eyes closed does away
with the visual mis-cues.

Sounds like a person should make their own ginger cookies to ensure they
actually have some ginger and not just a miniscule amount or an artificial
flavour. I understand you can also drink ginger beer.

As for medicines, from experience I would say don't use those Scopolamine
patches on an empty stomach!! Very unpleasant. I've also heard the dose
they contain may be too high for children or light-weights (like myself).
Cut them down and experiment on shore first.

"Nicky Shaw" <nicky.shaw@tesco.net > wrote in message
news:qZETc.41$x1.10@newsfe3-gui.ntli.net...
> As some one who has been sea sick most of his life I have the following
> suggestions:
>
> 1) Eat ginger biscuits (They are said to settle the stomach) and taste
good
> any way..
> 2) Stugerons / other travel pills can help but you can associate them with
> seasickness hence feel sick! (Not just me I know of others...Also see
point
> 7)
> 3) Keep Busy steer, trim a sail, repair a sail, whip a rope, peel
potatoes,
> go below to sleep, cook etc but don't just sit and feel ill...
> 4) Some people say you can not be sea sick lying down (I never have been)
> but don't lie back and die, try and stand your watch (bucket in hand) or
you
> might as well not be there...
> 5) Eat and drink (water or soft drinks ok maybe a little alcohol but not
to
> much) keep your stomach full or at least don't let it get MT its horrible
> retching up your stomach lining (Its about then I wish I am going to die!)
.
> I like Pot Noodles if its rough and someone puts the kettle on I have one
> instead of tea or coffee! Have lots of sandwiches on standby... Take
your
> own secret supplies if you don't know who you are sailing with..
> 6) Sea bands do work but for some people, how well is up to you see the
last
> point below.
> 7) Anxiety/ Mental sea sickness in my opinion (I know they are like A
holes,
> every bodies got one and no one wants to see any one else's) is the route
> cause of 90% of sea sickness.
>
> It is natural, you are in a new place or one seldom visited you are
> worried, is the weather going to be good, are the seas going to be big,
is
> the repaired mainsail going to hold, should we have more fuel the list is
> endless...
>
> How often do people feel sick just as it gets dark, they loose sight of
> land, the last buoy in the channel is passed the list is endless??
>
> On one occasion sailing with a very vain friend who started getting sea
sick
> (her fast small boat passage at sea) on passing the last buoy in the
channel
> I gave her a pint of water & some sandwiches. Then got out a camera and
> told her I would photograph the next person who was sea sick... After
that
> she started to feel better so did every one else and we had a very
pleasant
> trip, she never really forgave me though. She also has never been sea
sick
> since!
>
> There is NO EASY cure for this reduce your anxiety, easier said than
done...
>
> Ginger biscuits still ease the stomach, keeping busy stops you thinking
> about it, eating and drinking are always good!
>
>
> Gerrit Shaw
>
> I've been to busy sailing all my life than to learn to write or spell,
>
> >or indeed to use correct grammar.
>
> PS Be Careful which tree you sit under I understand some cruise liners
have
> trees on!!
> PPS Mars milk has a usefull trick of tasting the same coming out as it did
> going in...
>
>




24 Aug 2004 13:03:34
Kalico
Re: Sea Sickness

On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 20:59:51 GMT, "Gordon Wedman" <PacG@telus.net >
wrote:

>Good advice and I agree with the anxiety comment. Just being afraid can
>upset your stomach let alone being on a rocking boat. For this reason I
>think its important for the skipper to reassure the crew and always be
>positive.
>
>I've heard that lying down on the cabin sole and closing the eyes can make
>one feel better. Less motion down low and having the eyes closed does away
>with the visual mis-cues.
>
>Sounds like a person should make their own ginger cookies to ensure they
>actually have some ginger and not just a miniscule amount or an artificial
>flavour. I understand you can also drink ginger beer.
>
>As for medicines, from experience I would say don't use those Scopolamine
>patches on an empty stomach!! Very unpleasant. I've also heard the dose
>they contain may be too high for children or light-weights (like myself).
>Cut them down and experiment on shore first.

I've come to this thread a little late, having just returned from a
month sailing, sometimes with a very green crew. Here are my
thoughts:

I agree that ginger can help. Take some ginger capsules a while
before setting out and repeat every once in a while. Fresh ginger is
better still, and tasty.

Stugeron did work a treat for some but can cause drowsiness. I have
never tried any other remedies such as these.

DO NOT under any circumstances go below. If at all possible keep
top-side at all times, no matter how cold. Keep eyes on horizon. The
idea of lying on the cabin floor can work only because, being low, it
moves less but with the smell of diesel etc I have found it a recipe
for disaster.

Keep busy - this is a great one. People thinking of other things will
quickly recover from mild sea-sickness and if the sailing is fast
their adrenaline will sort it out too.

It is true about the fear factor and a good skipper should make all
his crew feel safe anyway.

In warmer climes, sea-sickeness is definitely made worse by
dehydration - keep up fluid intake.

Eat something - it works.

The number one best way I found to make people actually lose their
sea-sickness within a very short space of time was to put them out in
the tender on a line. I realise that this is only applicable for
certain types of blue-water cruising where one is already towing the
dinghy, but it really worked a treat. I can only assume it is the
different motion of the small, bouncy dinghy, rather than the rolling
yacht. Either that or the adrenaline gets going from hanging on.

Having the sails up changes the motion and is always preferable to
motoring, plus avoids the noise and smell.

My personal method if ever I have felt a bit of green-ness coming on
is to eat something then sleep, preferably in line with the yacht and
in the cockpit, never forward. I am lucky that I can sleep pretty
much anytime, especially with a full stomach. Failing that I will
drink alcohol (not too much) and have found that helps too.

Just some thoughts tested on my crew.

Not sure about other's experience but I have found females more prone
to sea-sickness than males. Not wanting to start a fight but what
have others found?

I've also found that anyone who says they have never been sea-sick in
all their years sailing is usually bluffing!

Regards to all
Rob



24 Aug 2004 13:56:38
Stefan Lloyd
Re: Sea Sickness

"Kalico" <rd@kalico.spam > wrote in message
news:toami095vi5olaj1q7uhvd6fsbii2k5hlf@4ax.com...
>
> Not sure about other's experience but I have found females more prone
> to sea-sickness than males. Not wanting to start a fight but what
> have others found?

That hasn't been my experienec.

> I've also found that anyone who says they have never been sea-sick in
> all their years sailing is usually bluffing!
>

I have come across a few such lucky people. I am not one of them.




24 Aug 2004 14:59:42
martin
Re: Sea Sickness

On Tue, 24 Aug 2004 13:56:38 +0100, "Stefan Lloyd" <dont@spam.me >
wrote:

>"Kalico" <rd@kalico.spam> wrote in message
>news:toami095vi5olaj1q7uhvd6fsbii2k5hlf@4ax.com...
>>
>> Not sure about other's experience but I have found females more prone
>> to sea-sickness than males. Not wanting to start a fight but what
>> have others found?
>
>That hasn't been my experienec.
>
>> I've also found that anyone who says they have never been sea-sick in
>> all their years sailing is usually bluffing!
>>
>
>I have come across a few such lucky people. I am not one of them.
>

I have never been seasick and I am not bluffing.
--
Martin


24 Aug 2004 14:32:21
PyroJames
Re: Sea Sickness


Kalico <rd@kalico.spam > wrote in message
news:toami095vi5olaj1q7uhvd6fsbii2k5hlf@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 20:59:51 GMT, "Gordon Wedman" <PacG@telus.net>
> wrote:

[snipped the bits I agree with :) ]

> DO NOT under any circumstances go below. If at all possible keep
> top-side at all times, no matter how cold. Keep eyes on horizon. The
> idea of lying on the cabin floor can work only because, being low, it
> moves less but with the smell of diesel etc I have found it a recipe
> for disaster.
>
I am not sure that I agree with this one though. I have found that people
getting cold, tired and then seasick, feel much better for a couple of hours
in a bunk.


> Not sure about other's experience but I have found females more prone
> to sea-sickness than males. Not wanting to start a fight but what
> have others found?

I have only ever met two other people who haven't been seasick. One was male
one female. The guy had been sailing with me for years in all conditions and
was 100% reliable, the girl was new to boats, sailing, and the whole concept
of being on the water. She couldn't swim, and I took her saioing and then
had a five hour bash home against a f5 over tide. She wasn't sick at all. I
was amazed, and was sure she was going to be very unhappy. I don't think any
of the other people I've been sailing with would have been OK.

>
> I've also found that anyone who says they have never been sea-sick in
> all their years sailing is usually bluffing!

I have never been seasick, and I am not bluffing.


--
PyroJames
I need more minions!




24 Aug 2004 15:33:04
martin
Re: Sea Sickness

On Tue, 24 Aug 2004 14:32:21 +0100, "PyroJames"
<j.kelman@cranNOfield.SPAMac.uk > wrote:

>

>I have never been seasick, and I am not bluffing.

That's two of us already :-)
--
Martin


24 Aug 2004 15:41:21
Duncan Heenan
Re: Sea Sickness


"martin" <me@privacy.net > wrote in message
news:mrgmi05sce24e0penk7u2kdu3ug1ooecee@4ax.com...
> On Tue, 24 Aug 2004 14:32:21 +0100, "PyroJames"
> <j.kelman@cranNOfield.SPAMac.uk> wrote:
>
> >
>
> >I have never been seasick, and I am not bluffing.
>
> That's two of us already :-)
> --
> Martin

I have been seasick many, many times, but still can't give up sailing.
However, my wife is a wonder - she can go below in very rough conditions,
cook a full meal, read a book, sleep, go to the loo, etc... any of those
sort of things. However she does feel the cold a lot more than me, so we
share out the duties according to ability and it seems we were made for
eachother (33 years so far....). So - advice to young folk contemplating
marriage - go sailing together first and see whether at least one of you can
do the below decks work! If you can't either give up sailing or give up
eachother.
A piece of advice my father (RN) used to give was, eat kippers before
setting off - at least they'll taste the same coming up as they did going
down.
Finally an observation medical folk might like to comment on. I have noticed
that among my family and friends, the less likely you are to be seasick the
less good your sense of balance. For example my wife (above) and my son who
is equally blessed with the no-seasickness gene, can't look down from high
buildings, climb ladders etc. My daughter and I who are happy with heights
are also prone to mal-de-mer. I have noticed this with other people and
nowadays ask people when I am sailing with them how they are with heights,
and I have noticed quite a widespread correlation. Any comments?
Duncan.
P.S. Sailed from Weymouth to the Isle of Wight yesterday and averaged 8.1
knots overall, in a Bavaria34. My fastest ever passage, and I didn't feel
sea sick!







24 Aug 2004 16:08:40
PyroJames
Re: Sea Sickness


Duncan Heenan <duncanheenan@tiscali.co.uk > wrote in message
news:412b53a7_1@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
>
> "martin" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
> news:mrgmi05sce24e0penk7u2kdu3ug1ooecee@4ax.com...
> > On Tue, 24 Aug 2004 14:32:21 +0100, "PyroJames"
> > <j.kelman@cranNOfield.SPAMac.uk> wrote:
> >
> > >
> >
> > >I have never been seasick, and I am not bluffing.
> >
> > That's two of us already :-)

> Finally an observation medical folk might like to comment on. I have
noticed
> that among my family and friends, the less likely you are to be seasick
the
> less good your sense of balance. For example my wife (above) and my son
who
> is equally blessed with the no-seasickness gene, can't look down from high
> buildings, climb ladders etc. My daughter and I who are happy with heights
> are also prone to mal-de-mer. I have noticed this with other people and
> nowadays ask people when I am sailing with them how they are with heights,
> and I have noticed quite a widespread correlation. Any comments?

Well, I don't really like heights, but my sense of balance is fine. :)
This is even though I used to climb quite a lot, and have no problems with
going up the mast, I just don't like the looking down bit!

So there might be a correlation with not liking heights, but I don't know if
it extends to a sense of balance.


--
PyroJames
Some days there just isn't enough accelerant




24 Aug 2004 18:02:42
Sandy Morton
Re: Sea Sickness

In article <4temi0tfa6a75pee03urv6mf29mug5ls2m@4ax.com >, martin
<me@privacy.net > wrote:
> >I have come across a few such lucky people. I am not one of them.
> >

> I have never been seasick and I am not bluffing.

Martin - can you walk on the water ? :-)

--
A T (Sandy) Morton
on the Bicycle Island
In the Global Village
http://www.millport.net


24 Aug 2004 19:37:23
Ian Johnston
Re: Sea Sickness

On Tue, 24 Aug 2004 12:59:42 UTC, martin <me@privacy.net > wrote:

: I have never been seasick and I am not bluffing.

I wasn't for the first fifteen years of sailing. Then I got
catastrophically sea sick on one trip: I am now dependent of
Scopoderm. Bit of a bugger, but it works fine and my GP is
understanding.

Ian


--



24 Aug 2004 22:34:26
martin
Re: Sea Sickness

On Tue, 24 Aug 2004 15:41:21 +0100, "Duncan Heenan"
<duncanheenan@tiscali.co.uk > wrote:

>
>"martin" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
>news:mrgmi05sce24e0penk7u2kdu3ug1ooecee@4ax.com...
>> On Tue, 24 Aug 2004 14:32:21 +0100, "PyroJames"
>> <j.kelman@cranNOfield.SPAMac.uk> wrote:
>>
>> >
>>
>> >I have never been seasick, and I am not bluffing.
>>
>> That's two of us already :-)

>Finally an observation medical folk might like to comment on. I have noticed
>that among my family and friends, the less likely you are to be seasick the
>less good your sense of balance. For example my wife (above) and my son who
>is equally blessed with the no-seasickness gene, can't look down from high
>buildings, climb ladders etc. My daughter and I who are happy with heights
>are also prone to mal-de-mer. I have noticed this with other people and
>nowadays ask people when I am sailing with them how they are with heights,
>and I have noticed quite a widespread correlation. Any comments?

I suffered from vertigo at one time.
--
Martin


24 Aug 2004 22:35:05
martin
Re: Sea Sickness

On Tue, 24 Aug 2004 18:02:42 +0100, Sandy Morton <sandy@millport.net >
wrote:

>In article <4temi0tfa6a75pee03urv6mf29mug5ls2m@4ax.com>, martin
><me@privacy.net> wrote:
>> >I have come across a few such lucky people. I am not one of them.
>> >
>
>> I have never been seasick and I am not bluffing.
>
>Martin - can you walk on the water ? :-)

not since I got the holes in my feet.
--
Martin


24 Aug 2004 23:01:30
Kalico
Re: Sea Sickness

[snip]
>Finally an observation medical folk might like to comment on. I have noticed
>that among my family and friends, the less likely you are to be seasick the
>less good your sense of balance. For example my wife (above) and my son who
>is equally blessed with the no-seasickness gene, can't look down from high
>buildings, climb ladders etc. My daughter and I who are happy with heights
>are also prone to mal-de-mer. I have noticed this with other people and
>nowadays ask people when I am sailing with them how they are with heights,
>and I have noticed quite a widespread correlation. Any comments?
>Duncan.
>P.S. Sailed from Weymouth to the Isle of Wight yesterday and averaged 8.1
>knots overall, in a Bavaria34. My fastest ever passage, and I didn't feel
>sea sick!
>
I'm not sure about balance, with which I don't have a problem (luckily
as I also ride a motorbike - well, I hope) but you might have a thing
there about the vertigo which would be consistent with the people I
have taken sailing over the years.

My biggest problem is a degree of clumsiness, always stubbing toes,
not lifting my feet high enough through bulkheads and (most commonly)
banging my head.

I just put it down to being 6'2" and my budget not buying me an
appropriately sized yacht, but it is so bad that my regular crew and
girlfriend have now titled me 'CMF'. C = Clumsy, M standing for
Mother. F being for 'Nuff said I think'.

I'm sure it's about time some University of Nowhere started a degree
in 'Seasickness and its relating to vertigo'. Or was it just a joke
that one can now obtain a degree in 'David Beckham'?

Tut, tut, mutter, mutter!

Regards
Rob



26 Aug 2004 13:59:48
John Seager
Re: Sea Sickness

-
*** Remove NOSPAM to reply ***
"Duncan Heenan" <duncanheenan@tiscali.co.uk > wrote in message
news:412b53a7_1@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
>
> "martin" <me@privacy.net> wrote in message
> news:mrgmi05sce24e0penk7u2kdu3ug1ooecee@4ax.com...
> > On Tue, 24 Aug 2004 14:32:21 +0100, "PyroJames"
> > <j.kelman@cranNOfield.SPAMac.uk> wrote:
> >
> > >
> >
> > >I have never been seasick, and I am not bluffing.
> >
> > That's two of us already :-)
> > --
> > Martin
>
> I have been seasick many, many times, but still can't give up sailing.
> However, my wife is a wonder - she can go below in very rough conditions,
> cook a full meal, read a book, sleep, go to the loo, etc... any of those
> sort of things. However she does feel the cold a lot more than me, so we
> share out the duties according to ability and it seems we were made for
> eachother (33 years so far....). So - advice to young folk contemplating
> marriage - go sailing together first and see whether at least one of you
can
> do the below decks work! If you can't either give up sailing or give up
> eachother.
> A piece of advice my father (RN) used to give was, eat kippers before
> setting off - at least they'll taste the same coming up as they did going
> down.
> Finally an observation medical folk might like to comment on. I have
noticed
> that among my family and friends, the less likely you are to be seasick
the
> less good your sense of balance. For example my wife (above) and my son
who
> is equally blessed with the no-seasickness gene, can't look down from high
> buildings, climb ladders etc. My daughter and I who are happy with heights
> are also prone to mal-de-mer. I have noticed this with other people and
> nowadays ask people when I am sailing with them how they are with heights,
> and I have noticed quite a widespread correlation. Any comments?
> Duncan.
> P.S. Sailed from Weymouth to the Isle of Wight yesterday and averaged 8.1
> knots overall, in a Bavaria34. My fastest ever passage, and I didn't feel

> sea sick!
>
>
When in my early twenties I sailed the length and breadth of the Atlantic on
some small merchant ships (3-5,000 tons) and experienced Force 12 off the
Caribbean and several severe gales in Antarctic waters - and wasn't the
slightest bit seasick, unlike most of my crewmates. However, with the
passing years (now in my early 50s) and having my own 30 foot yacht, I find
that certain types of seas make me go green within minutes. Most days I'm OK
but don't much enjoy working on the engine at sea or too long at the chart
table. Thus it seems that seasickness might be age related.

On the vertigo story - I recently experienced this for the first time and
had all the symptoms of severe motion sickness in my own bedroom!!!

John.




26 Aug 2004 16:51:44
Kalico
Re: Sea Sickness

[snip]
On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 13:59:48 +0200, "John Seager"
>
>On the vertigo story - I recently experienced this for the first time and
>had all the symptoms of severe motion sickness in my own bedroom!!!
>
>John.
>
Well we'll be kind and not ask what you might have been up to?

Rob


Replace 'spam' with 'org' to reply


26 Aug 2004 17:57:52
martin
Re: Sea Sickness

On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 16:51:44 +0100, Kalico <rd@kalico.spam > wrote:

>[snip]
>On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 13:59:48 +0200, "John Seager"
>>
>>On the vertigo story - I recently experienced this for the first time and
>>had all the symptoms of severe motion sickness in my own bedroom!!!
>>
>>John.
>>
>Well we'll be kind and not ask what you might have been up to?

an attack of whirling pits?
--
Martin


26 Aug 2004 18:37:33
Paul Cooper
Re: Sea Sickness

On Thu, 26 Aug 2004 13:59:48 +0200, "John Seager"
<jseager@nospam.hsrc.ac.za > wrote:

>>
>>
>When in my early twenties I sailed the length and breadth of the Atlantic on
>some small merchant ships (3-5,000 tons) and experienced Force 12 off the
>Caribbean and several severe gales in Antarctic waters - and wasn't the
>slightest bit seasick, unlike most of my crewmates. However, with the
>passing years (now in my early 50s) and having my own 30 foot yacht, I find
>that certain types of seas make me go green within minutes. Most days I'm OK
>but don't much enjoy working on the engine at sea or too long at the chart
>table. Thus it seems that seasickness might be age related.
>
>On the vertigo story - I recently experienced this for the first time and
>had all the symptoms of severe motion sickness in my own bedroom!!!
>
>John.
>


I can second that. From childhood, I sailed regularly and never
suffered sea-sickness - an occasional fit of nausea mainly caused by
diesel fumes, but nothing that made me feel really ill. Indeed, I
usually really enjoyed a rough passage! Then, in my mid twenties I
spent some time on a seismic survey vessel in the North Sea, and the
environment of a closed computer room sitauted right on the centre of
rotation of the vessel caused me to turn myself inside out - no fun
when I had to fit being really sick in the interval between changing
recording tapes!

But since then, I've had no problems, including a passage in a collier
from Spitzbergen to Narvik when the Barents Sea was playing up.

So, I guess it is entirely a matter of what suits you. You can be
immune for years, but hit the wrong circumstances and it'll get you!

Paul


26 Aug 2004 20:49:38
Arwen Lune
Re: Sea Sickness

In article <412b53a7_1@mk-nntp-2.news.uk.tiscali.com >, Duncan
Heenan proclaimed...

> For example my wife (above) and my son who
> is equally blessed with the no-seasickness gene, can't
> look down from high buildings, climb ladders etc. My
> daughter and I who are happy with heights are also
> prone to mal-de-mer. I have noticed this with other
> people and nowadays ask people when I am sailing with
> them how they are with heights, and I have noticed
> quite a widespread correlation. Any comments?

Hmm, don't see it. My brother is terrible with heights and never
wants to go sailing again after he got sick on a fishing trip once,
I am quite good with heights and haven't been more than a bit
uneasy in the stomach *so far*. And I admit I don't have months and
months of sea experience but it certainly got bumpy enough at times
for other people to be sick...

(great combination, being 30 metres aloft when it gets bumpy..)

Cheers,
Arwen

--
"Bother" said Pooh. "We... have no use for adventures. Nasty
disturbing uncomfortable things! Make you late for dinner!"