23 Feb 2005 18:03:34
Mobey Dick
Poole harbour anchot

Speaking of Poole harbour anchor (someone was earlier)... what is the
correct method for mooring in the 'deep' channels?

It seems the only places you can anchor in a 1.6M draft boat is in the
'long, narrow' deep channels. If you drop anchor in the deep bit, the scope
means that with any wind change you are either in the shallows or in the
middle of the marked channel;. Also it seems incorrect to lay an anchor
chain across a marked channel.

So what is the correct procedure? I guess you could lay two anchors (bower
and kedge) to stop swinging, but 1) the kedge would be in the shallows so
that means a dingy trip to lay, and 2) nobody does that.

Is it just drop the hook in a deep bit and keep checking for a wind shift
all night?

Moby




23 Feb 2005 22:34:43
Alastair
Re: Poole harbour anchot

On Wed, 23 Feb 2005 18:03:34 -0000, "Mobey Dick"
<understandable9@hotmail.com > wrote:

>Speaking of Poole harbour anchor (someone was earlier)... what is the
>correct method for mooring in the 'deep' channels?
>
>It seems the only places you can anchor in a 1.6M draft boat is in the
>'long, narrow' deep channels. If you drop anchor in the deep bit, the scope
>means that with any wind change you are either in the shallows or in the
>middle of the marked channel;. Also it seems incorrect to lay an anchor
>chain across a marked channel.
>
>So what is the correct procedure? I guess you could lay two anchors (bower
>and kedge) to stop swinging, but 1) the kedge would be in the shallows so
>that means a dingy trip to lay, and 2) nobody does that.
>
>Is it just drop the hook in a deep bit and keep checking for a wind shift
>all night?
>
>Moby
>
>

The correct method is that you don't. You anchor to the side of the
channel. If necessary you keep an anchor watch. If you can't stay
awake all night they have provided a nice pontoon at the end of the
quay where lots of people will be only too delighted to keep you awake
whether you want to or not.

Many of the quieter corners have soft enough mud that a fin keel will
just sink into it.


--
Alastair


24 Feb 2005 01:29:16
Nick Temple-Fry
Re: Poole harbour anchot

You drop your main anchor up into the stream, you fall back on it to 7 times
your max depth, drop your 2'nd anchor and pull back until you are resting
(lieing on the main achor and its scope) about half way between. Pull your
second achor tight till you can feel that its bit, then drop about twice its
depth in additional chain. Put a quick lashing on both chains as they leave
the stem head, pull up a couple of metres of both and lash again (this help
stop the chains tangling). Row to the pub, come back, go soundly to sleep.

Leave your kedge in the locker.

This will hold you in place with a turning circle of not much more than
twice your length, unless you get very strong cross winds, in which case
you may need more scope on both chains (but you shouldn't have anchored
there if that was expected).

Look out for your neighbours, unfortunately they may have been on courses.

www.Temple-Fry.coppp.ukppp.takeouttheP
> Speaking of Poole harbour anchor (someone was earlier)... what is the
> correct method for mooring in the 'deep' channels?
>
> It seems the only places you can anchor in a 1.6M draft boat is in the
> 'long, narrow' deep channels. If you drop anchor in the deep bit, the
scope
> means that with any wind change you are either in the shallows or in the
> middle of the marked channel;. Also it seems incorrect to lay an anchor
> chain across a marked channel.
>
> So what is the correct procedure? I guess you could lay two anchors (bower
> and kedge) to stop swinging, but 1) the kedge would be in the shallows so
> that means a dingy trip to lay, and 2) nobody does that.
>
> Is it just drop the hook in a deep bit and keep checking for a wind shift
> all night?
>
> Moby
>
>




24 Feb 2005 04:02:10
k
Re: Poole harbour anchot

Excellent stuff.

Any good hints on setting up and running a 2nd anchor from the stern of
a double- ender? There's not a lot of room back there...



24 Feb 2005 13:47:42
Nick Temple-Fry
Re: Poole harbour anchot

Both anchors should be run over the stem not the stern. In the case of the
example given running one anchor over the stern could end up with the boat
aligned broadside to the wind but along the line of the stream. This would
be uncomfortable and potentially increase the risk of dragging.

I've only ever dropped an anchor over the stern once, and that was just to
see how the boat rode and find out any difficulties. Being double ended it
rode well, but I can't see how recovery can avoid being messy.


www.Temple-Fry.coppp.ukppp.takeouttheP
"k" <duff@netcomuk.co.uk > wrote in message
news:1109246530.797220.252480@l41g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> Excellent stuff.
>
> Any good hints on setting up and running a 2nd anchor from the stern of
> a double- ender? There's not a lot of room back there...
>




24 Feb 2005 08:51:51
k
Re: Poole harbour anchot

Thanks.

I'll start saving for that double roller then...



24 Feb 2005 20:33:33
Mobey Dick
Re: Poole harbour anchot

Thanks

But the times I have been there the other boats are lined up (on single
anchors) with only enough space to get another one in 'in-line'

Your method seems fine when there is no one else around (now for instance)

moby

"Nick Temple-Fry" <Nick@Temple-FryPPP.coPPP.ukTakeout theP > wrote in message
news:RrKdnfLOCIF9sYDfRVnysw@brightview.com...
> You drop your main anchor up into the stream, you fall back on it to 7
> times
> your max depth, drop your 2'nd anchor and pull back until you are resting
> (lieing on the main achor and its scope) about half way between. Pull your
> second achor tight till you can feel that its bit, then drop about twice
> its
> depth in additional chain. Put a quick lashing on both chains as they
> leave
> the stem head, pull up a couple of metres of both and lash again (this
> help
> stop the chains tangling). Row to the pub, come back, go soundly to sleep.
>
> Leave your kedge in the locker.
>
> This will hold you in place with a turning circle of not much more than
> twice your length, unless you get very strong cross winds, in which case
> you may need more scope on both chains (but you shouldn't have anchored
> there if that was expected).
>
> Look out for your neighbours, unfortunately they may have been on courses.
>
> www.Temple-Fry.coppp.ukppp.takeouttheP
>> Speaking of Poole harbour anchor (someone was earlier)... what is the
>> correct method for mooring in the 'deep' channels?
>>
>> It seems the only places you can anchor in a 1.6M draft boat is in the
>> 'long, narrow' deep channels. If you drop anchor in the deep bit, the
> scope
>> means that with any wind change you are either in the shallows or in the
>> middle of the marked channel;. Also it seems incorrect to lay an anchor
>> chain across a marked channel.
>>
>> So what is the correct procedure? I guess you could lay two anchors
>> (bower
>> and kedge) to stop swinging, but 1) the kedge would be in the shallows so
>> that means a dingy trip to lay, and 2) nobody does that.
>>
>> Is it just drop the hook in a deep bit and keep checking for a wind shift
>> all night?
>>
>> Moby
>>
>>
>
>