29 Mar 2005 05:03:32
Jim O
sail flip in a jibe

When someone ask you how to flip the sail in a jibe what is the best
way to describe it? Should you through with your back hand or something
like that? Should there be a time when no hands are on the boom during
this procedure? Any other jibe tips are welcome. A whole jibe
scenerio might be needed. Thanks in advance, Jim



29 Mar 2005 07:36:13
Re: sail flip in a jibe

Hi Jim.
First on the sail flip, you need to have your front hand as far forward
as possible so that the sail will not develope power during the flip.
With the step jibe, you slide your front hand to the mast as you step
forward.

I just release the back hand and look forward. Don't let your eyes
follow the sail. If you look at the sail you will probably bend at the
waist (very bad). Next pull with the mast hand to get the mast up over
the board (also very important).

Finally, reach under with the old back hand and grab the boom on the
new side with an underhand grip, drop, pop,and sail away on a plane.

No problem. Good luck
Stu Snodgrass

Jim O wrote:
> When someone ask you how to flip the sail in a jibe what is the best
> way to describe it? Should you through with your back hand or
something
> like that? Should there be a time when no hands are on the boom
during
> this procedure? Any other jibe tips are welcome. A whole jibe
> scenerio might be needed. Thanks in advance, Jim



29 Mar 2005 08:34:49
Isobars
Re: sail flip in a jibe

Sounds like neither of you has seen my jibe tutorial, far too long and
detailed to present here again. Two principles pertinent to this specific
question include: You don't just RELEASE the sail; you THROW it HARD into a
spin about its center, rather than LETTING it blow around its hinges (the
mast) like a barn door. The barn door approach usually loses the plane,
because the wind can't blow the sail around the mast until our board speed
drops below the apparent wind speed. "Spinning the top", OTOH, allows no
apparent loss of speed -- even promotes acceleration if done right -- from
one beam reach to the next. If I touch the rig at all between both hands on
the incoming boom side and both hands on the boom on the exit boom side,
it's because I've screwed up and am trying to recover. Any other time I
handle the rig it dramatically slows the sail spin and thus the whole jibe.

Caveat: I have no idea how well this works with 10.0s; the largest sails
I've ever used or done this with are 7.5s.

Mike m/

<ssnodgrass@foxrothschild.com > wrote in message
news:1112110573.355580.139720@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Hi Jim.
> First on the sail flip, you need to have your front hand as far forward
> as possible so that the sail will not develope power during the flip.
> With the step jibe, you slide your front hand to the mast as you step
> forward.
>
> I just release the back hand and look forward. Don't let your eyes
> follow the sail. If you look at the sail you will probably bend at the
> waist (very bad). Next pull with the mast hand to get the mast up over
> the board (also very important).
>
> Finally, reach under with the old back hand and grab the boom on the
> new side with an underhand grip, drop, pop,and sail away on a plane.
>
> No problem. Good luck
> Stu Snodgrass
>
> Jim O wrote:
>> When someone ask you how to flip the sail in a jibe what is the best
>> way to describe it? Should you through with your back hand or
> something
>> like that? Should there be a time when no hands are on the boom
> during
>> this procedure? Any other jibe tips are welcome. A whole jibe
>> scenerio might be needed. Thanks in advance, Jim
>




29 Mar 2005 09:06:01
kurt
Re: sail flip in a jibe


Same gig w/ 10.0's. I push/throw the thing around, otherwise it will
never make it.



29 Mar 2005 12:55:37
Dan Weiss
Re: sail flip in a jibe

Enter your jibe sailing as fast as possible. Rarely speed be your enemy, as
it generates apparent wind and makes the flip a much less muscle-bound
affair than certain descriptions might make it sound. The lower your
apparent wind at the time you flip (low apparent wind comes from board speed
matching true wind speed) the easier the sail transition.

-Dan
"Jim O" <econno42@earthlink.net > wrote in message
news:1112101411.975545.132220@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> When someone ask you how to flip the sail in a jibe what is the best
> way to describe it? Should you through with your back hand or something
> like that? Should there be a time when no hands are on the boom during
> this procedure? Any other jibe tips are welcome. A whole jibe
> scenerio might be needed. Thanks in advance, Jim
>




29 Mar 2005 10:15:05
Re: sail flip in a jibe

Actully in really light wind formula sailing, this can be an issue.
The apparent wind direction approaches the induced wind direction
(straight ahead) when you enter the jibe. Thus, as you carve the board
downwind, the apparent wind stays on your nose, and sheeting out really
puts on the brakes. Suppose you're planing at 15mph in 9mph of true
wind, when you jibe, you could potentially be going dead downwind with
a 6mph headwind. The best solution I've found is to make sure I don't
oversheet the sail when entering the turn, don't make a real tight
turn, and make sure I get the sail flipped early and quick. Often
wondered if a monkey jibe (sailor steps in front of mast) would be a
solution, never had the balls to try it with my 12.5 though.

sm


Dan Weiss wrote:
> Enter your jibe sailing as fast as possible. Rarely speed be your
enemy, as
> it generates apparent wind and makes the flip a much less
muscle-bound
> affair than certain descriptions might make it sound. The lower your

> apparent wind at the time you flip (low apparent wind comes from
board speed
> matching true wind speed) the easier the sail transition.
>
> -Dan
> "Jim O" <econno42@earthlink.net> wrote in message
> news:1112101411.975545.132220@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
> > When someone ask you how to flip the sail in a jibe what is the
best
> > way to describe it? Should you through with your back hand or
something
> > like that? Should there be a time when no hands are on the boom
during
> > this procedure? Any other jibe tips are welcome. A whole jibe
> > scenerio might be needed. Thanks in advance, Jim
> >



29 Mar 2005 14:02:35
Dan Weiss
Re: sail flip in a jibe

Right. Good points, SM. That's why I said rarely :)

As a mediocre FW sailor myself, I either try to jam a jibe as tightly as
possible which seems to create centrifugal force and helps the sail go
around, or take a wider jibe and use the rig to help steer the board.
Mostly the wider jibes help keep the speed up on exit. You can also delay
the sail flip, sort of like a reverse clew step jibe, which lets the leech
of the sail load up as you continue to plane in the new direction. The sail
snaps around pretty well, but you need to make sure to allow it to open and
breathe on the new tack in order to get resistance to push against. Or else
I find my heels weigh down the windward rail too much.

-Dan
<smyer@fit.edu > wrote in message
news:1112120105.023411.103040@z14g2000cwz.googlegroups.com...
> Actully in really light wind formula sailing, this can be an issue.
> The apparent wind direction approaches the induced wind direction
> (straight ahead) when you enter the jibe. Thus, as you carve the board
> downwind, the apparent wind stays on your nose, and sheeting out really
> puts on the brakes. Suppose you're planing at 15mph in 9mph of true
> wind, when you jibe, you could potentially be going dead downwind with
> a 6mph headwind. The best solution I've found is to make sure I don't
> oversheet the sail when entering the turn, don't make a real tight
> turn, and make sure I get the sail flipped early and quick. Often
> wondered if a monkey jibe (sailor steps in front of mast) would be a
> solution, never had the balls to try it with my 12.5 though.
>
> sm
>
>
> Dan Weiss wrote:
>> Enter your jibe sailing as fast as possible. Rarely speed be your
> enemy, as
>> it generates apparent wind and makes the flip a much less
> muscle-bound
>> affair than certain descriptions might make it sound. The lower your
>
>> apparent wind at the time you flip (low apparent wind comes from
> board speed
>> matching true wind speed) the easier the sail transition.
>>
>> -Dan
>> "Jim O" <econno42@earthlink.net> wrote in message
>> news:1112101411.975545.132220@o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...
>> > When someone ask you how to flip the sail in a jibe what is the
> best
>> > way to describe it? Should you through with your back hand or
> something
>> > like that? Should there be a time when no hands are on the boom
> during
>> > this procedure? Any other jibe tips are welcome. A whole jibe
>> > scenerio might be needed. Thanks in advance, Jim
>> >
>




29 Mar 2005 18:04:23
kurt
Re: sail flip in a jibe


What Dan said about jamming the (formula) jibe so that the sail flips
better seems to be right; it's what I do, in addition to pushing the
thing around.

Either that, or a long swooping jibe that you exit clew first & then
flip once on the opposite tack. Getting a 10.0 or > sail to flip
around takes a little strategy.....



30 Mar 2005 13:21:08
Re: sail flip in a jibe

I suppose that throwing it may help, but I don't throw the sail and I
plane out of my jibes. I think that the more important thing is the
setup and entering the jibe with speed and not losing speed becasue of
bad techniques like getting the weight back and pulling in on the boom
rather than letting the sail pull you up over the rail.

my 2 cents worth
Stu Snodgrass



01 Apr 2005 12:02:28
Isobars
Re: sail flip in a jibe

<ssnodgrass@foxrothschild.com > wrote ...
>I suppose that throwing it may help, but I don't throw the sail and I
> plane out of my jibes. I think that the more important thing is the
> setup and entering the jibe with speed and not losing speed becasue of
> bad techniques like getting the weight back and pulling in on the boom
> rather than letting the sail pull you up over the rail.

Certainly those are vital points, and apparently you've gotten past the
standard scenario at many Gorge spots, where people rip across the river
leaping and slashing and doing tricks and lookin' GOOD, only to reach the
shore, bear off, and run downwind until they slow sufficiently that the wind
hits them from behind to swing their sail around the mast (how else can the
wind turn the sail?) -- at which point 90% of them drop off a plane, swerve
towards the new broad reach so the back of the boom swings within reach,
grab with the new back hand, pump and/or power back onto a plane, and start
windsurfing again.

Sure, this gets them turned around, but it's not a planing jibe by
definition, it takes time and effort (especially on a sinker), and it looks
more like a step in the learning curve than a desired end state. Yet the
vast majority of them do it the same way week in and year out. Not only did
THROWING the boom take me from not jibing to jibing, it changes the jibe
from a relatively long, drawn-out process subject to chop and swell into a
one- or two-second act pretty much independent of terrain. There is no
running downwind, no coasting phase (OK . . . a second or so as the sail
spins), minimal upset from chopswell, no loss of speed, no appreciable loss
of ground if trying to get upwind, and a big wall of spray.

With my lousy sense of balance, it also helps my stalled/pivot jibes: I drop
the stern, spin the sail -- which by equal'n'opposite reaction spins the
board towards the new broad reach -- and in the space of a heartbeat I'm on
the new beam reach with the new boom side and feet right where they should
be in the new reach. No more time spent in a prolonged transition from port
to starboard fighting chop/swell with no counterbalancing rig in my hands!
(Of course, if I'm still not powered up, I often drop in anyway, but that's
another story.)

At the other power extreme -- overpowered -- spinning the sail at the
instant we sense no wind (often just as we slash off the beam reach and the
apparent wind disappears for a second) means we spend the whole jibe (except
for one second in a perceived vacuum) SAILING, rather than feeling like
we're surfing while manhandling a drive-in movie screen in a gale. It's just
like any other quick slash off a lip, except this one is 180 degrees, not
45.

OTOH, this way leaves no time for tricks, for playing on a wave face, or for
looking at the beach to see who's watching, so it's not perfect. It's just a
very fast, efficient, dry, exciting means of completely reversing direction
in the time and space many people take just to initiate a carve. It also got
me over the jibing hump.

Mike m/





01 Apr 2005 19:06:03
Dan Weiss
Re: sail flip in a jibe

Mike wrote:

> Certainly those are vital points, and apparently you've gotten past the
> standard scenario at many Gorge spots, where people rip across the river
> leaping and slashing and doing tricks and lookin' GOOD, only to reach the
> shore, bear off, and run downwind until they slow sufficiently that the
> wind hits them from behind to swing their sail around the mast (how else
> can the wind turn the sail?) SNIP

The sail flips from the shift in apparent wind across the bow, not because
the it catches up from behind. Unless you were being sarcastic, of course.

-Dan




01 Apr 2005 20:54:33
jeff feehan
Re: sail flip in a jibe

Dan Weiss wrote:
> Mike wrote:
>
>
>>Certainly those are vital points, and apparently you've gotten past the
>>standard scenario at many Gorge spots, where people rip across the river
>>leaping and slashing and doing tricks and lookin' GOOD, only to reach the
>>shore, bear off, and run downwind until they slow sufficiently that the
>>wind hits them from behind to swing their sail around the mast (how else
>>can the wind turn the sail?) SNIP
>
>
> The sail flips from the shift in apparent wind across the bow, not because
> the it catches up from behind. Unless you were being sarcastic, of course.
>
> -Dan
>
>
and the sort of circular sweeping motion, which i'm not so good at,
but which i am learning, that can be done with the mast during the
rotation.

jeff feehan


02 Apr 2005 03:52:24
Florian Feuser /FFF/
Re: sail flip in a jibe

Fick wrote:
>>>Certainly those are vital points, and apparently you've gotten past
>>>the standard scenario at many Gorge spots, where people rip across
>>>the river leaping and slashing and doing tricks and lookin' GOOD,
>>>only to reach the shore, bear off, and run downwind until they slow
>>>sufficiently that the wind hits them from behind to swing their sail
>>>around the mast (how else can the wind turn the sail?) SNIP

Sometimes that happens. If the chop doesn't allow to bear off full-speed
or I don't want to lose to much way to windward, I slow down for a tight
jibe and let the wind assist the sail flip during the last 90 degrees of
the turn. Especially in a lot of wind I find that a better option than
exiting the jibe clew-first.

Usually, I fall off a full plane as I rotate my hips, grab the boom,
sheet in and step forward with my "old" back foot. I prefer to sail
downwind with no apparent wind and "throw" the sail around. Despite
being

Dan replied:
>> The sail flips from the shift in apparent wind across the bow, not
>> because the it catches up from behind. Unless you were being
>> sarcastic, of course. -Dan

The what catches up from behind? Mike?
I find that in over 25kts, I rarely experience the apparent wind across
the bow during the jibe - except if I jibe during a significant lull or
"inside" the wind line, near shore.

You must be pretty fast....

Jeff added:
> and the sort of circular sweeping motion, which i'm not so good at,
> but which i am learning, that can be done with the mast during the
> rotation.

I remember when I was trying to learn how to jibe, the "circular
sweeping motion" was a major stumbling block. I figured out eventually
to rotate the rig actively around its center of gravity instead which
lets the board carve the transition without disturbance from rig
momentum.

I am not sure if I understand exactly what you're describing, but for me
it was never helpful.

florian /FFF/


01 Apr 2005 20:27:34
Isobars
Re: sail flip in a jibe

If a sailor is running before the wind, the rig isn't going to blow around
its hinge when released until the board speed drops below the ambient wind
so the apparent wind is from aft.

Mike m/
.
"Dan Weiss" <dwus484@comcast.net > wrote in message
news:BYWdna7q-6V2fNDfRVn-gQ@comcast.com...
> Mike wrote:
>
>> Certainly those are vital points, and apparently you've gotten past the
>> standard scenario at many Gorge spots, where people rip across the river
>> leaping and slashing and doing tricks and lookin' GOOD, only to reach the
>> shore, bear off, and run downwind until they slow sufficiently that the
>> wind hits them from behind to swing their sail around the mast (how else
>> can the wind turn the sail?) SNIP
>
> The sail flips from the shift in apparent wind across the bow, not because
> the it catches up from behind. Unless you were being sarcastic, of
> course.
>
> -Dan
>




01 Apr 2005 20:54:34
Isobars
Re: sail flip in a jibe

"jeff feehan" <jfeehan@ix.netcom.com > wrote ga...
> Dan Weiss wrote:
>> The sail flips from the shift in apparent wind across the bow, not
>> because the it catches up from behind. Unless you were being sarcastic,
>> of course.
>>
>> -Dan
> and the sort of circular sweeping motion, which i'm not so good at,
> but which i am learning, that can be done with the mast during the
> rotation.
>
> jeff feehan

Unless it's a giant-sail thing, I suspect this circular motion is a
substitute for spinning the sail by one proper method or another. It's not
something I've seen good or excellent jibers do, and there's not TIME for it
in a quick jibe.

Mike m/




02 Apr 2005 08:12:55
jeff feehan
Re: sail flip in a jibe

Isobars wrote:
> "jeff feehan" <jfeehan@ix.netcom.com> wrote ga...
>
>>Dan Weiss wrote:
>>
>>>The sail flips from the shift in apparent wind across the bow, not
>>>because the it catches up from behind. Unless you were being sarcastic,
>>>of course.
>>>
>>>-Dan
>>
>>and the sort of circular sweeping motion, which i'm not so good at,
>>but which i am learning, that can be done with the mast during the
>>rotation.
>>
>>jeff feehan
>
>
> Unless it's a giant-sail thing, I suspect this circular motion is a
> substitute for spinning the sail by one proper method or another. It's not
> something I've seen good or excellent jibers do, and there's not TIME for it
> in a quick jibe.
>
> Mike m/
>
>
mike,
you and i have had this discussuion before - it's something that many
top sailors do, but it can be subtle, or not so subtle, depending...

boards magazine had a good article about it a year or two ago, it was
presented as an advanced modification of the jibe, and something they
strongly recommend.

i am sure you would recognize it right away, and say "oh, that.."

i would say it might be used more in jibes where maintaining speed is
more of a priority than having as tight as turn as possible. i don't mean
that it's a light wind technique, just that when you go for a really tight
arc, you have implicitly chosen to give up a little speed, and that this
technique might be used on a more drawn out arc that might be chosen
when the sailor wishes to keep more speed on.

really good sailors have a variety of jibes at their disposal, and use them
as the conditions dictate.

i'll try to find an on-line video that shows it.

jeff feehan





02 Apr 2005 09:24:18
Isobars
Re: sail flip in a jibe

"jeff feehan" <jfeehan@ix.netcom.com > wrote > mike,
> you and i have had this discussuion before - it's something that many
> top sailors do, but it can be subtle, or not so subtle, depending...
> i am sure you would recognize it right away, and say "oh, that.."


That's quite possible, maybe likely, as I've never been one for subtleties.
More telling yet, I don't even remember discussing the "stir-the-mast" bit
before. Just one more manifestation of the small pile of gray bits lying on
my pillow each morning.


> i would say it might be used more in jibes where maintaining speed is
> more of a priority than having as tight as turn as possible. i don't mean
> that it's a light wind technique, just that when you go for a really tight
> arc, you have implicitly chosen to give up a little speed, and that this
> technique might be used on a more drawn out arc that might be chosen
> when the sailor wishes to keep more speed on.


OTOH, one of the several reasons I like tight jibes is that they spend the
least amount of time coasting, thus lose no detectable speed, often gaining
speed because you're powered up on both of the jibe's broad reach segments.
Any time spent stirring the pot is time coasting, which is time
decelerating.

Mike m/




03 Apr 2005 09:14:17
Dan Weiss
Re: sail flip in a jibe

Right. But only where poor or unusual jibing technique is found. No
planing windsurfer I know sails dead downwind for any period of time. We
pass through the eye of the wind in a jibe, and the true wind does cross the
tail of the board during the jibe. The apparent wind, however, swings
across so fast as to make the likelihood of the true wind causing the rig to
flip pretty unlikely. That's all I meant.

-Dan
"Isobars" <notgonnahappen@not.today > wrote in message
news:Hap3e.2595$y_3.2571@fe04.lga...
> If a sailor is running before the wind, the rig isn't going to blow around
> its hinge when released until the board speed drops below the ambient wind
> so the apparent wind is from aft.
>
> Mike m/
> .
> "Dan Weiss" <dwus484@comcast.net> wrote in message
> news:BYWdna7q-6V2fNDfRVn-gQ@comcast.com...
>> Mike wrote:
>>
>>> Certainly those are vital points, and apparently you've gotten past the
>>> standard scenario at many Gorge spots, where people rip across the river
>>> leaping and slashing and doing tricks and lookin' GOOD, only to reach
>>> the shore, bear off, and run downwind until they slow sufficiently that
>>> the wind hits them from behind to swing their sail around the mast (how
>>> else can the wind turn the sail?) SNIP
>>
>> The sail flips from the shift in apparent wind across the bow, not
>> because the it catches up from behind. Unless you were being sarcastic,
>> of course.
>>
>> -Dan
>>
>
>




03 Apr 2005 08:34:44
Isobars
Re: sail flip in a jibe

Come to the Gorge. The vast majority of people here -- > 8 out of 10 at the
Hatchery anywhere east of "Kodak Point" and at many other places -- jibe in
such a broad arc that they DO run downwind until they lose their speed, let
the overtaking wind jibe the sail for them as Stu described, pump or power
back onto a plane, and sail away again. The ones I've asked about this call
that a planing jibe and do it deliberately. Don't forget I'm talking
sinkers, not big boards.

Mike m/

"Dan Weiss" <dwus484@comcast.net > wrote in message
news:C8qdnZNfZ6G1cdLfRVn-tg@comcast.com...
> Right. But only where poor or unusual jibing technique is found. No
> planing windsurfer I know sails dead downwind for any period of time. We
> pass through the eye of the wind in a jibe, and the true wind does cross
> the tail of the board during the jibe. The apparent wind, however, swings
> across so fast as to make the likelihood of the true wind causing the rig
> to flip pretty unlikely. That's all I meant.
>
> -Dan
> "Isobars" <notgonnahappen@not.today> wrote in message
> news:Hap3e.2595$y_3.2571@fe04.lga...
>> If a sailor is running before the wind, the rig isn't going to blow
>> around its hinge when released until the board speed drops below the
>> ambient wind so the apparent wind is from aft.
>>
>> Mike m/
>> .
>> "Dan Weiss" <dwus484@comcast.net> wrote in message
>> news:BYWdna7q-6V2fNDfRVn-gQ@comcast.com...
>>> Mike wrote:
>>>
>>>> Certainly those are vital points, and apparently you've gotten past the
>>>> standard scenario at many Gorge spots, where people rip across the
>>>> river leaping and slashing and doing tricks and lookin' GOOD, only to
>>>> reach the shore, bear off, and run downwind until they slow
>>>> sufficiently that the wind hits them from behind to swing their sail
>>>> around the mast (how else can the wind turn the sail?) SNIP
>>>
>>> The sail flips from the shift in apparent wind across the bow, not
>>> because the it catches up from behind. Unless you were being
>>> sarcastic, of course.
>>>
>>> -Dan
>>>
>>
>>
>
>




03 Apr 2005 13:54:22
m--newsguy
Re: sail flip in a jibe

I was backwinded a few times today jibing a 6.2, rushing the flip.
It's not only giant sails that get backwinded...I'd say that until the
wind hits about 25 knots it's always possible.

For an excellent tutorial on the sail flip (and the rest of a planing
step jibe) pick up a copy of Dasher's jibe DVD.



04 Apr 2005 03:50:14
brad
Re: sail flip in a jibe


I might as well ask for some advice too...

I'm on a 89L board and I generally try an 'aggressive' jibe in that I go
in hot hang down on the boom, roll my hips over, flip the sail with both
hands, etc. My success is about 20% coming out planing and maybe 60%
coming out without crashing. However, there is a going theme in my
crashes-- the sail is too far forward after I flip it. When I am turning (
sail still original position) I am bending my knees and hanging down and
then I push the mast forward, sheet in, pause, pause til I'm downwind
and flip. BUT many times the mast is still about 50degrees to the water
when the boom comes back to me, I grab the boom and struggle to keep
from falling forward but almost always go head first over the board
because the sail has more leverage than me. When I try to stay more
upright with my body position (less knee bend, less laying over the rail)
and sail I can never seem to get my board planning all the way through.
Is there just a happy medium between the two and? Sometimes I feel that
I dont wait long enough to flip the sail??

thanks-
brad


04 Apr 2005 08:59:23
Craig (gsogh) Goudie
Re: sail flip in a jibe

If you're getting pulled over the nose, It's likely not a sail flip problem.
More likely, that you don't have enough speed going into the jibe.
You should be able to "coast" through the entire 90 degrees of turn
without having to reach for the sail. Next time you try it I recommend
going just as fast as you possibly can as you enter the jibe.

-Craig

brad wrote:

> I might as well ask for some advice too...
>
> I'm on a 89L board and I generally try an 'aggressive' jibe in that I go
> in hot hang down on the boom, roll my hips over, flip the sail with both
> hands, etc. My success is about 20% coming out planing and maybe 60%
> coming out without crashing. However, there is a going theme in my
> crashes-- the sail is too far forward after I flip it. When I am turning (
> sail still original position) I am bending my knees and hanging down and
> then I push the mast forward, sheet in, pause, pause til I'm downwind
> and flip. BUT many times the mast is still about 50degrees to the water
> when the boom comes back to me, I grab the boom and struggle to keep
> from falling forward but almost always go head first over the board
> because the sail has more leverage than me. When I try to stay more
> upright with my body position (less knee bend, less laying over the rail)
> and sail I can never seem to get my board planning all the way through.
> Is there just a happy medium between the two and? Sometimes I feel that
> I dont wait long enough to flip the sail??
>
> thanks-
> brad

--
Craig (Go Short or Go Home!) Goudie
Sailing the high desert lakes of Utah on my:
RRD 298, RRD TT and Cross M 8'2" with
Sailworks/Naish Sails and Rec Composites Fins
Sailing the Gorge on my: 9'1" RRD Freeride,
8'3" Logosz Squish, 8'0" Hitech IBM with
Sailworks/Northwave Sails and Curtis Fins




04 Apr 2005 10:32:45
Re: sail flip in a jibe

If he is going over the front because he is catching a rail, then he is
pulling the mast too far back over the board. There was a good example
of this in Alan Cadiz Jibe video.