28 Jun 2004 23:07:03
Brian Sangeorzan
mast repair

I've got an old Sailworks 500cm mast (75% carbon I think), which shows
surface cracks just above the boom. They're cracks you can 'catch' with
your finger nail, and not scratches. I'm thinking about trying a
repair/reinforcement. I just ordered some braided carbon sleeves from
Aerospace Composite Products, that I plan to slip over the mast and epoxy
into place. I'll certainly sand the mast in the repair area, and I'm
thinking about vacuum-bagging or heat shrink wrapping the glass as it cures.
Any suggestions? Am I wasting my time?

--
Brian




29 Jun 2004 19:08:20
The Dennises
Re: mast repair

Hmmm... I'll be interested to hear how that turns out. If it were me I'd
trade the mast in, but that's not a recommendation.

Wal

"Brian Sangeorzan" <ub@wideopenwest.com > wrote in message
news:EaWdnRmc78GYQH3d4p2dnA@wideopenwest.com...
> I've got an old Sailworks 500cm mast (75% carbon I think), which shows
> surface cracks just above the boom. They're cracks you can 'catch' with
> your finger nail, and not scratches. I'm thinking about trying a
> repair/reinforcement. I just ordered some braided carbon sleeves from
> Aerospace Composite Products, that I plan to slip over the mast and epoxy
> into place. I'll certainly sand the mast in the repair area, and I'm
> thinking about vacuum-bagging or heat shrink wrapping the glass as it
cures.
> Any suggestions? Am I wasting my time?
>
> --
> Brian
>
>




30 Jun 2004 12:05:01
Bill
Re: mast repair

Brian Sangeorzan wrote:
> I've got an old Sailworks 500cm mast (75% carbon I think), which shows
> surface cracks just above the boom. They're cracks you can 'catch'
> with your finger nail, and not scratches. I'm thinking about trying a
> repair/reinforcement. I just ordered some braided carbon sleeves from
> Aerospace Composite Products, that I plan to slip over the mast and
> epoxy into place. I'll certainly sand the mast in the repair area,
> and I'm thinking about vacuum-bagging or heat shrink wrapping the
> glass

Glass?

as it cures. Any suggestions? Am I wasting my time?

Go for it! Cost to repair. $10? $50? $150?




30 Jun 2004 21:23:39
Brian Sangeorzan
Re: mast repair

$10 for the carbon sleeve + a few $ more for epoxy resin + bagging/vacuum
expenses = not too much. It will take precious time. Was wondering if
anyone else has attempted such.

"Bill" <utthitaxpam@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:2kg6kmF22iejU1@uni-berlin.de...
> Brian Sangeorzan wrote:
> > I've got an old Sailworks 500cm mast (75% carbon I think), which shows
> > surface cracks just above the boom. They're cracks you can 'catch'
> > with your finger nail, and not scratches. I'm thinking about trying a
> > repair/reinforcement. I just ordered some braided carbon sleeves from
> > Aerospace Composite Products, that I plan to slip over the mast and
> > epoxy into place. I'll certainly sand the mast in the repair area,
> > and I'm thinking about vacuum-bagging or heat shrink wrapping the
> > glass
>
> Glass?
>
> as it cures. Any suggestions? Am I wasting my time?
>
> Go for it! Cost to repair. $10? $50? $150?
>
>




02 Jul 2004 12:23:59
Wolfgang Soergel
Re: mast repair

Brian Sangeorzan wrote:
>
> $10 for the carbon sleeve + a few $ more for epoxy resin + bagging/vacuum
> expenses = not too much. It will take precious time. Was wondering if
> anyone else has attempted such.
>
I made a similar Repair once, when a mast split at the bottom of the top
section. I used unidirectional carbon fiber wrapped around the mast, no
vacuum bagging (but i wrapped it with the same stuff used for bagging
and then a few rounds of tape while curing). Seemed to hold up well,
even when powered (this was a 40% 460 mast). But the repair was
certainly more than just one wrap, i'd assume around 500g/m^2 overall,
i.e. around 3 layers.

I also did repair a high carbon content race mast which completely broke
above the boom. Actually i broke two masts and used both of them to get
one: After cutting away the frayed ends, i made a "ferule", just like at
the regular joint, from a piece of one broke mast, a bit farther up.
inserted it into the bottom half of the broken part, glued wirth
epoxid+microballoons., then the top was glues on and the repair area
again wrapped with uni-d carbon and epoxid. Also seems to hold up.

So the repair you want to do could work out and stabilize the mast. Make
sure the mast surface is roughed up a bit, really clean and free from
dust and grease. But there still is no guarantee.

Disclaimer: I'd never use a repaired mast in any situation where i have
to rely on my gear, like cold weather, offshore winds on big bodies of
water and so on.

--
Wolfgang


02 Jul 2004 14:36:24
Brian Sangeorzan
Re: mast repair

Thanks Wolfgang,
I'm doing the repair/reinforcement today. I'm using a braided carbon sleeve
that somewhat matches the original layup. I'm just thinking of two layers
right now, since the mast isn't really "broken". I'm going to try vacuum
bagging to get all the air bubbles out, although the guy at aerospace
composite products told me that heat-shrink would be easier and cleaner.
We'll see.
Brian

"Wolfgang Soergel" <wsoergel@lnt.de > wrote in message
news:40E537BF.ABD@lnt.de...
> Brian Sangeorzan wrote:
> >
> > $10 for the carbon sleeve + a few $ more for epoxy resin +
bagging/vacuum
> > expenses = not too much. It will take precious time. Was wondering if
> > anyone else has attempted such.
> >
> I made a similar Repair once, when a mast split at the bottom of the top
> section. I used unidirectional carbon fiber wrapped around the mast, no
> vacuum bagging (but i wrapped it with the same stuff used for bagging
> and then a few rounds of tape while curing). Seemed to hold up well,
> even when powered (this was a 40% 460 mast). But the repair was
> certainly more than just one wrap, i'd assume around 500g/m^2 overall,
> i.e. around 3 layers.
>
> I also did repair a high carbon content race mast which completely broke
> above the boom. Actually i broke two masts and used both of them to get
> one: After cutting away the frayed ends, i made a "ferule", just like at
> the regular joint, from a piece of one broke mast, a bit farther up.
> inserted it into the bottom half of the broken part, glued wirth
> epoxid+microballoons., then the top was glues on and the repair area
> again wrapped with uni-d carbon and epoxid. Also seems to hold up.
>
> So the repair you want to do could work out and stabilize the mast. Make
> sure the mast surface is roughed up a bit, really clean and free from
> dust and grease. But there still is no guarantee.
>
> Disclaimer: I'd never use a repaired mast in any situation where i have
> to rely on my gear, like cold weather, offshore winds on big bodies of
> water and so on.
>
> --
> Wolfgang