31 Aug 2005 20:32:34
Using a Kite on a Formula Board?

Can you use a kite on a formula board?



31 Aug 2005 21:02:22
kurt
Re: Using a Kite on a Formula Board?

I'd say no. I've got a Formula board, & I'm in the early stages of
experimenting w/ the dark side (hey, it's fun). I can't imagine any
way whatsoever that the two are compatible.



01 Sep 2005 06:41:16
Re: Using a Kite on a Formula Board?

You can kite on almost anything. Windsurf board, surfboard, skimboard,
kiteboard, plywood, doors, etc. The largest board I have ever used was
my 69L wave board (windsurf). A friend of mine was playing around with
a Exocet cruiser on the beach and having a blast with a kite in light
wind.



01 Sep 2005 16:25:22
Steven Slaby
Re: Using a Kite on a Formula Board?


(georgeisrael@yahoo.com) writes:
> Can you use a kite on a formula board?
>

I tried a kite on a Starboard Start on a lightwind day and it worked
moderatly well; grip might be a challenge on a formula but kiters have been
going strapless on surfboards in lightwind so just about anything is possible.

Steve.


--
----------------------------------------------
Ottawa Windsurfing http://ottawawindsurfing.ca


01 Sep 2005 16:52:15
J. M. Colee
Re: Using a Kite on a Formula Board?

I saw some guys trying to power a hobie-cat with a kite in Maui. Didn't look
all that fun to me even when they we're going. They ended up capsizing the
boat and coming ashore in a lava rock infested area. Decidedly not fun :-(

Mike

<ryan_owens@msn.com > wrote in message
news:1125582076.215870.101090@g44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> You can kite on almost anything. Windsurf board, surfboard, skimboard,
> kiteboard, plywood, doors, etc. The largest board I have ever used was
> my 69L wave board (windsurf). A friend of mine was playing around with
> a Exocet cruiser on the beach and having a blast with a kite in light
> wind.
>




01 Sep 2005 11:11:21
uglyjiber
Re: Using a Kite on a Formula Board?

Of course you can do it.

Wouldn't be optimum, but it's a good way to practice kite handling
skills. I modified an older beat up formula board by putting a center
fin in it, using a smaller fin in the back ( like 40 cm instead of 70)
and adding foot straps further forward and inboard.

Gets VERY unruly in any sort of decent breeze w/ chop. Only really good
in the lightest of conditions.



08 Sep 2005 22:28:16
LeeD
Re: Using a Kite on a Formula Board?

Pretty acknowledge best underpowered board is a longboard surfboard,
the bigger the better....
Full rocker allows for holding power at low speeds (you are
underpowered)
Floatation allows you to stand just ahead of center and use all it's
surface area to stay upwind even when the kite barely flies
Thin rails hold well, won't bounce out. Best is the old style 50/50
peaked rails, like in the board made in the '60's (traditional log)
Wax is better and softer traction than nonskid abrasives
Weight (around 17-25lbs), gives momentum, so you don't need to be
constantly powered, and stuff happens in slow motion



09 Sep 2005 05:35:12
WARDOG
Re: Using a Kite on a Formula Board?

Our SurfLife 9'6" Moana Surfrider soft surfboard would prolly work
pretty well...the foam technology is very advanced...
I've seen a couple of guys on old water-logged logs cruisin' and
longboarding small waves...
http://surfingsports.com
http://surfingsports.com/surflife.asp

One of the better guys around here, that actually surfs, just had my
surfboard shaper make him a Fish...and Jeff Henderson proved that you
can windsurf on a Fish quite well...

http://surfingsports.com/super_freaky_fish/index.html

WARDOG
http://surfingsports.com

LeeD wrote:
> Pretty acknowledge best underpowered board is a longboard surfboard,
> the bigger the better....
> Full rocker allows for holding power at low speeds (you are
> underpowered)
> Floatation allows you to stand just ahead of center and use all it's
> surface area to stay upwind even when the kite barely flies
> Thin rails hold well, won't bounce out. Best is the old style 50/50
> peaked rails, like in the board made in the '60's (traditional log)
> Wax is better and softer traction than nonskid abrasives
> Weight (around 17-25lbs), gives momentum, so you don't need to be
> constantly powered, and stuff happens in slow motion
>