30 Oct 2003 09:17:20
K. Fan
Have you ever noticed...?

I was listening to the Paris matches today on Eurosport and I noticed
that the commentators refer to the players by their nationality ("The
American leads 2-1....", "The Spaniard holds serve...") Referring to
players by their nationality seems to be mostly a European phenom.
It's just not done in the US, where commentators (for the most part)
refer to all players by their surnames, regardless of where they're
from.

Not that there's anything wrong with that. I just find it fascinating.
I wonder why they do that?


30 Oct 2003 17:41:47
Sakari Lund
Re: Have you ever noticed...?

On 30 Oct 2003 09:17:20 -0800, mzgurl27@optonline.net (K. Fan) wrote:

>I was listening to the Paris matches today on Eurosport and I noticed
>that the commentators refer to the players by their nationality ("The
>American leads 2-1....", "The Spaniard holds serve...") Referring to
>players by their nationality seems to be mostly a European phenom.
>It's just not done in the US, where commentators (for the most part)
>refer to all players by their surnames, regardless of where they're
>from.
>
>Not that there's anything wrong with that. I just find it fascinating.
>I wonder why they do that?

Probably mostly for a little bit more vivid language. They don't say
"Ferrero" every time, instead they say sometimes "the Spaniard" or
"world number one" etc.


30 Oct 2003 11:52:24
Robert B. Waltz
Re: Have you ever noticed...?

sakari.lund@pp.inet.fi (Sakari Lund) wrote:

> On 30 Oct 2003 09:17:20 -0800, mzgurl27@optonline.net (K. Fan) wrote:
>
> >I was listening to the Paris matches today on Eurosport and I noticed
> >that the commentators refer to the players by their nationality ("The
> >American leads 2-1....", "The Spaniard holds serve...") Referring to
> >players by their nationality seems to be mostly a European phenom.
> >It's just not done in the US, where commentators (for the most part)
> >refer to all players by their surnames, regardless of where they're
> >from.
> >
> >Not that there's anything wrong with that. I just find it fascinating.
> >I wonder why they do that?
>
> Probably mostly for a little bit more vivid language. They don't say
> "Ferrero" every time, instead they say sometimes "the Spaniard" or
> "world number one" etc.

I think the observation is slightly wrong anyway. American
media occasionally describe players by their nationality.

For that matter, *I* do it -- and for exactly the reason you
describe. Variety. It gets deadly dull to say, "Clijsters
hits a backhand. Venus hits a forehand. Clijsters hits a
forehand. Venus hits a backhand. Clijsters hits a drop shot.
Venus races to it." You can't call either player "she," most
of the time; it's too vague. So saying, e.g., "the Belgian"
offers a change of nouns.


30 Oct 2003 17:48:22
Gordon Cameron
Re: Have you ever noticed...?

"Robert B. Waltz" <waltzmn@skypoint.com > wrote in message news:<waltzmn-3AC15D.11522430102003@corp.supernews.com>...
>
> For that matter, *I* do it -- and for exactly the reason you
> describe. Variety. It gets deadly dull to say, "Clijsters
> hits a backhand. Venus hits a forehand. Clijsters hits a
> forehand. Venus hits a backhand. Clijsters hits a drop shot.
> Venus races to it." You can't call either player "she," most
> of the time; it's too vague. So saying, e.g., "the Belgian"
> offers a change of nouns.

Or in the case of a Clijsters/Henin-Hardenne match, you could say,
"The Walloon smacks a backhand up the line," etc. :)


30 Oct 2003 19:58:15
Robert B. Waltz
Re: Have you ever noticed...?

gcameron@neteze.com (Gordon Cameron) wrote:

> "Robert B. Waltz" <waltzmn@skypoint.com> wrote in message
> news:<waltzmn-3AC15D.11522430102003@corp.supernews.com>...
> >
> > For that matter, *I* do it -- and for exactly the reason you
> > describe. Variety. It gets deadly dull to say, "Clijsters
> > hits a backhand. Venus hits a forehand. Clijsters hits a
> > forehand. Venus hits a backhand. Clijsters hits a drop shot.
> > Venus races to it." You can't call either player "she," most
> > of the time; it's too vague. So saying, e.g., "the Belgian"
> > offers a change of nouns.
>
> Or in the case of a Clijsters/Henin-Hardenne match, you could say,
> "The Walloon smacks a backhand up the line," etc. :)

There, I might use "#1" and "#2" or "Hewitt's girlfriend"
or "the second seed" or "the 2001 champion" or something
like that. But it *is* harder when two players are from
the same country.


31 Oct 2003 23:06:28
Whisper
Re: Have you ever noticed...?


"K. Fan" <mzgurl27@optonline.net > wrote in message
news:5b6608f.0310300917.7dcbb3ea@posting.google.com...
> I was listening to the Paris matches today on Eurosport and I noticed
> that the commentators refer to the players by their nationality ("The
> American leads 2-1....", "The Spaniard holds serve...") Referring to
> players by their nationality seems to be mostly a European phenom.
> It's just not done in the US, where commentators (for the most part)
> refer to all players by their surnames, regardless of where they're
> from.
>
> Not that there's anything wrong with that. I just find it fascinating.
> I wonder why they do that?

Do you really...?




31 Oct 2003 19:55:11
Sakari Lund
Re: Have you ever noticed...?

On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 19:58:15 -0600, "Robert B. Waltz"
<waltzmn@skypoint.com > wrote:

>> Or in the case of a Clijsters/Henin-Hardenne match, you could say,
>> "The Walloon smacks a backhand up the line," etc. :)
>
>There, I might use "#1" and "#2" or "Hewitt's girlfriend"
>or "the second seed" or "the 2001 champion" or something
>like that. But it *is* harder when two players are from
>the same country.

"#1" and" #2" would be too confusing, because they change places on a
weekly basis :-)


31 Oct 2003 15:09:02
Robert B. Waltz
Re: Have you ever noticed...?

sakari.lund@pp.inet.fi (Sakari Lund) wrote:

> On Thu, 30 Oct 2003 19:58:15 -0600, "Robert B. Waltz"
> <waltzmn@skypoint.com> wrote:
>
> >> Or in the case of a Clijsters/Henin-Hardenne match, you could say,
> >> "The Walloon smacks a backhand up the line," etc. :)
> >
> >There, I might use "#1" and "#2" or "Hewitt's girlfriend"
> >or "the second seed" or "the 2001 champion" or something
> >like that. But it *is* harder when two players are from
> >the same country.
>
> "#1" and" #2" would be too confusing, because they change places on a
> weekly basis :-)

Only when JHH is #1. When Clijsters is #1, they do it twice a
month. :-)