31 Jul 2003 00:43:55
Roger
Preserving old boats

The thread on the Carbocraft 8+ degenerated into a discussion on how
to best destroy our old wooden boats. Unfotunately appreciation of old
wooden racing shells is hardly widespread in UK rowing circles and the
Henley museum despite doing a top job in taking in historic racing
shells is in IMO p***ing into the wind when it comes to collecting
boats to show a comprehensive thread of the development of the breed
and preserving what's best of what's left.

Every year old wooden boats which were state of the art twenty years
ago are burnt on BBQs etc to make way for new kit. The US seems to be
slightly ahead of us here in that there at least seems to be an
appreciation of what are some of the most beautiful rowing boats
built.

I'm not sure that converting a 70 year old French 4+ (how many of
these are there left in the world) into a garden ornament is the best
thing to do. No critisim of Dave H intended because I don't know what
condition the boat was in before it's move to the mound but am I alone
in thinking that we are shortly going to run out of wooden boats to
burn?


31 Jul 2003 08:06:22
Dave Henderson
Re: Preserving old boats

Maybe you have a point (no, I have the point - it's in my garden...)

Sorry 'bout that.

At the time this particular four was disposed of, our boathouse was
full of ancient hulks, most of them more venerable and unusual than
this one which was just an old shell four like any other old shell
four (it is a Dossunet, by the way). None of them had any useful life
left.

We still have quite a few curiosities left on our racks - the ones
that will still float. Other clubs here in Belgium are in a similar
position. You could fill several museums with them. At a 5km race
here this Summer we entered a 'yole' (side-seated clinker tub 4) and
because of a problem with our (relatively modern) boat we had to
borrow one, which I would estimate dated from +/- World War One.

A boat, restored or otherwise, takes up a lot of space. As I said,
this particular four looks - to the layman - much the same as, say,
our two Sims and our Stampfli of c1965-70. An expert like Mr Douglas
might find a great deal of interest in the detail of the construction,
but that can just as well be inspected through the glass of a coffee
table or any other piece of formerly floating furniture.

Anyway, come to Belgium and view the historical hardware still to be
seen gracing our rivers and canals. Come in February and you can see
these museum-pieces in action in our Winter Handicap - yoles,
yolettes, you-yous, funnys, triplettes, double canoes. There's still
plenty of 'heritage' about - maybe too much, according to the clubs
that can't afford to replace it.

Dave H
Royal Sport Nautique de Bruxelles



tlog@angelfire.com (Roger) wrote in message news:<e8e8b6da.0307302343.78c94d47@posting.google.com >...
> The thread on the Carbocraft 8+ degenerated into a discussion on how
> to best destroy our old wooden boats. Unfotunately appreciation of old
> wooden racing shells is hardly widespread in UK rowing circles and the
> Henley museum despite doing a top job in taking in historic racing
> shells is in IMO p***ing into the wind when it comes to collecting
> boats to show a comprehensive thread of the development of the breed
> and preserving what's best of what's left.
>
> Every year old wooden boats which were state of the art twenty years
> ago are burnt on BBQs etc to make way for new kit. The US seems to be
> slightly ahead of us here in that there at least seems to be an
> appreciation of what are some of the most beautiful rowing boats
> built.
>
> I'm not sure that converting a 70 year old French 4+ (how many of
> these are there left in the world) into a garden ornament is the best
> thing to do. No critisim of Dave H intended because I don't know what
> condition the boat was in before it's move to the mound but am I alone
> in thinking that we are shortly going to run out of wooden boats to
> burn?


31 Jul 2003 20:30:23
Riggers
Re: Preserving old boats

Our boat shed is full of old wooden 4s and 8s, some of which are still
used by the novices.....poor things, how it can be good for them to
lift some of these things beats me.....

I would gladly see the back of them, although using them for something
useful and maybe generating a few bucks for the club would be better
than what we usually do....and burn them....

There is an interesting old wooden 4 hidden away on the top
racks....this boat is sectioned just aft of the stroke seat and has 2
alternative stern sections....coxed or coxless.....marvellous !!
Would be even better if it was in rowable condition.

Whilst some of these boats still play an important part in our
club....I would gladly excahnge them for newer boats....after
all.....I come down to the shed to row, to train and compete....not to
see ancient relics.....well....except for the ones that I row with !!


01 Aug 2003 03:04:38
Alister Taylor
Re: Preserving old boats

We've a similar interesting one hanging from the roof of our gym -

A bow sectioned pair, with coxed and coxless bows. A scary concept, IMHO.


andyr@irow.com (Riggers) wrote in message news:<3a9275f4.0307311930.346a79e0@posting.google.com >...
> Our boat shed is full of old wooden 4s and 8s, some of which are still
> used by the novices.....poor things, how it can be good for them to
> lift some of these things beats me.....
>
> I would gladly see the back of them, although using them for something
> useful and maybe generating a few bucks for the club would be better
> than what we usually do....and burn them....
>
> There is an interesting old wooden 4 hidden away on the top
> racks....this boat is sectioned just aft of the stroke seat and has 2
> alternative stern sections....coxed or coxless.....marvellous !!
> Would be even better if it was in rowable condition.
>
> Whilst some of these boats still play an important part in our
> club....I would gladly excahnge them for newer boats....after
> all.....I come down to the shed to row, to train and compete....not to
> see ancient relics.....well....except for the ones that I row with !!


01 Aug 2003 05:45:07
Kevin Dahlhausen
Re: Preserving old boats

> Anyway, come to Belgium and view the historical hardware still to be
> seen gracing our rivers and canals.

Ok that's it. I'm coming over - been dying to come to Belgium and
sample your fine beers first hand ( although they do travel well ).
So to row old wooden shells then hit the pub - could it get any
better?