29 Jan 2008 08:31:16
Jake
James Cracknell in a Burgashell

From the Burgashell website:

<<18/1/2007 - James Cracknell in a Burgashell

James Cracknell has selected Burgashell to build him a boat to row the
English Channel for Sports Relief. Based on our popular Coastal Scull,
this high performance composite craft will have to withstand more than
your average scull! Check back here for progress and updates...
The story at Sport Relief (opens new window). >>

It appears that he's sculling across the channel, cycling through
Europe and swimming the straits of Gibraltar, in a UK to Africa
marathon (or should that be triathlon) trip. Anybody know whether he
is aware of/ trying to beat Guin Batten's cross channel sculling
record in the process? It's beatable in a coastal scull with the right
athlete, which I guess he probably still is.

Sport relief is in March. This could mean he will be attempting it
between then and now which could make finding a weather window/
staying in the boat an issue (unless he's got outriggers on it). If it
was me, I'd rather go in June in high pressure conditions, setting off
at first light so I would be finished before any sea breeze set in.
You could do it in a river boat then (like Guin did, although it was a
Resolute and they were very sturdy logitundinally thanks to their I-
beam thingy).


29 Jan 2008 08:36:36
boatie
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

I will find out tomorrow whether he's aware of Guin's record (although
I find it hard to believe he woudn't be). His company shares offices
with one of my clients.....[aside, it's highly entertaining to see
them all bow and scrape and fawn all over him when he comes into the
office....nuff said].

But I did see the shell at the ARA conference this weekend. Not very
long but very wide compored to a fine single.... shouldn't ship much
water and will crest waves beautifully. Not much fun to row IMO.


29 Jan 2008 17:58:37
Christopher Anton
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell


"Jake" <jake.frith@rya.org.uk > wrote in message
news:86a2fb99-2075-4bb1-927e-e716371e0ebc@i72g2000hsd.googlegroups.com...
> From the Burgashell website:
>
> <<18/1/2007 - James Cracknell in a Burgashell
>
> Sport relief is in March. This could mean he will be attempting it
> between then and now which could make finding a weather window/
> staying in the boat an issue (unless he's got outriggers on it). If it
> was me, I'd rather go in June in high pressure conditions, setting off
> at first light so I would be finished before any sea breeze set in.
> You could do it in a river boat then (like Guin did, although it was a
> Resolute and they were very sturdy logitundinally thanks to their I-
> beam thingy).

You'd have to get the tides right first whatever the weather window. If you
miss Cap Gris Nez it's a hell of a lot further.




29 Jan 2008 23:22:08
Carl Douglas
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

Jake wrote:
> From the Burgashell website:
>
> <<18/1/2007 - James Cracknell in a Burgashell
>
> James Cracknell has selected Burgashell to build him a boat to row the
> English Channel for Sports Relief. Based on our popular Coastal Scull,
> this high performance composite craft will have to withstand more than
> your average scull! Check back here for progress and updates...
> The story at Sport Relief (opens new window). >>
>
> It appears that he's sculling across the channel, cycling through
> Europe and swimming the straits of Gibraltar, in a UK to Africa
> marathon (or should that be triathlon) trip. Anybody know whether he
> is aware of/ trying to beat Guin Batten's cross channel sculling
> record in the process? It's beatable in a coastal scull with the right
> athlete, which I guess he probably still is.
>
> Sport relief is in March. This could mean he will be attempting it
> between then and now which could make finding a weather window/
> staying in the boat an issue (unless he's got outriggers on it). If it
> was me, I'd rather go in June in high pressure conditions, setting off
> at first light so I would be finished before any sea breeze set in.
> You could do it in a river boat then (like Guin did, although it was a
> Resolute and they were very sturdy logitundinally thanks to their I-
> beam thingy).

It is less well known that Guin was accompanied on her channel crossing
by Bob Gullet (also Thames RC) in one of our Custom singles. Bob's boat
was then ~12 years old, hard used & has no such "I-beam thingy". Still
he charges up & down the Thames in it.

For those thinking of sculling the Channel in a racing single, one
problem is that on even a calm day the swell, although longer than on a
river, can be much larger. What at first looks smooth can, especially
if helped by a bulk carrier passing 3 miles away, be enough to bury most
of both decks at once - which hardly helps progress - & as you move
through that wave you can get the reverse effect of both ends out &
water in your lap. This is great way to test a shell's structural
strength & integrity but a shorter boat with more freeboard may be
better suited to the job.

Cheers -
Carl

--
Carl Douglas Racing Shells -
Fine Small-Boats/AeRoWing Low-drag Riggers/Advanced Accessories
Write: Harris Boatyard, Laleham Reach, Chertsey KT16 8RP, UK
Email: carl@carldouglas.co.uk Tel: +44(0)1932-570946 Fax: -563682
URLs: www.carldouglas.co.uk (boats) & www.aerowing.co.uk (riggers)



29 Jan 2008 15:38:53
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

On Jan 29, 3:22=A0pm, Carl Douglas <c...@carldouglas.co.uk > wrote:
> Jake wrote:
> > From the Burgashell website:
>
> > <<18/1/2007 - James Cracknell in a Burgashell
>
> > James Cracknell has selected Burgashell to build him a boat to row the
> > English Channel for Sports Relief. Based on our popular Coastal Scull,
> > this high performance composite craft will have to withstand more than
> > your average scull! Check back here for progress and updates...
> > The story at Sport Relief (opens new window). >>
>
> > It appears that he's sculling across the channel, cycling through
> > Europe and swimming the straits of Gibraltar, in a UK to Africa
> > marathon (or should that be triathlon) trip. Anybody know whether he
> > is aware of/ trying to beat Guin Batten's cross channel sculling
> > record in the process? It's beatable in a coastal scull with the right
> > athlete, which I guess he probably still is.
>
> > Sport relief is in March. This could mean he will be attempting it
> > between then and now which could make finding a weather window/
> > staying in the boat an issue (unless he's got outriggers on it). If it
> > was me, I'd rather go in June in high pressure conditions, setting off
> > at first light so I would be finished before any sea breeze set in.
> > You could do it in a river boat then (like Guin did, although it was a
> > Resolute and they were very sturdy logitundinally thanks to their I-
> > beam thingy).
>
> It is less well known that Guin was accompanied on her channel crossing
> by Bob Gullet (also Thames RC) in one of our Custom singles. =A0Bob's boat=

> was then ~12 years old, hard used & has no such "I-beam thingy". =A0Still
> he charges up & down the Thames in it.
>
> For those thinking of sculling the Channel in a racing single, one
> problem is that on even a calm day the swell, although longer than on a
> river, can be much larger. =A0What at first looks smooth can, especially
> if helped by a bulk carrier passing 3 miles away, be enough to bury most
> of both decks at once - which hardly helps progress - & as you move
> through that wave you can get the reverse effect of both ends out &
> water in your lap. =A0This is great way to test a shell's structural
> strength & integrity but a shorter boat with more freeboard may be
> better suited to the job.
>
> Cheers -
> Carl
>
> --
> Carl Douglas Racing Shells =A0 =A0 =A0 =A0-
> =A0 =A0 =A0Fine Small-Boats/AeRoWing Low-drag Riggers/Advanced Accessories=

> Write: =A0 Harris Boatyard, Laleham Reach, Chertsey KT16 8RP, UK
> Email: c...@carldouglas.co.uk =A0Tel: +44(0)1932-570946 =A0Fax: -563682
> URLs: =A0www.carldouglas.co.uk(boats) &www.aerowing.co.uk(riggers)- Hide q=
uoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

So they rowed along together? Was it a sprint finish to see who would
get credit for the "Record"?

I could have sworn your boats do include an "I beam thingy" in the
form of what I've seen called a "stringer", and I thought that
Resolute prided themselves on monocoque consruction expressly lacking
an "I beam thingy", but I could be mistaken.

- Paul Smith


30 Jan 2008 01:38:35
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

Morning all

James' Burgashell Coastal Scull (named Continental Challenge, not Blue
Moon as I was hoping for) is pretty much identical to our standard
Coastal Scull, with the addition of a small self-bailer to get rid of
water that will inevitably end up in the footwell. The boat is our
standard 4 piece construction, 3 layer single-skin carbon hull with
stateroom monocoque and two double skin canvases, in Sport Relief
colours.

This boat class has been used to row around the Isle of Wight and is
the standard class for UK South Coast Racing. Our Coastal Sculls,
Doubles & Fours have become popular as replacements for the wooden
boats previously used. I will be following James across the Channel in
the support boat and writing an article about it for UK Rowing &
Regatta Magasine.

This boat shape has evolved on the South Coast specifically to excel
in difficult coastal conditions, and the shape provides buoyancy in a
shorter hull length, which is more suitable in a short swell. To
compare a fine scull to a coastal scull is sort of to suggest that a
Formula One car would actually be an ideal choice on a rally course!

I am not sure whether James is specifically trying to break the
English Channel record, as he then has to cycle and swim for the rest
of the day, and he certainly hasn't chosen the ideal time of year -
based on the timing of Sport Relief, not when he might have preferred
to do it. Nevertheless, we're very excited to see how he gets on and
wish him the best of luck. The boat is being delivered to James today
and I'll be preflighting and discussing any optimisations with him
before the crossing.

Nick


30 Jan 2008 03:58:21
carolinetu
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

On Jan 30, 9:38=A0am, n...@burgashell.co.uk wrote:
> Morning all
>
> James' Burgashell Coastal Scull (named Continental Challenge, not Blue
> Moon as I was hoping for) is pretty much identical to our standard
> Coastal Scull, with the addition of a small self-bailer to get rid of
> water that will inevitably end up in the footwell. The boat is our
> standard 4 piece construction, 3 layer single-skin carbon hull with
> stateroom monocoque and two double skin canvases, in Sport Relief
> colours.
>
> This boat class has been used to row around the Isle of Wight and is
> the standard class for UK South Coast Racing. Our Coastal Sculls,
> Doubles & Fours have become popular as replacements for the wooden
> boats previously used. I will be following James across the Channel in
> the support boat and writing an article about it for UK Rowing &
> Regatta Magasine.
>
> This boat shape has evolved on the South Coast specifically to excel
> in difficult coastal conditions, and the shape provides buoyancy in a
> shorter hull length, which is more suitable in a short swell. To
> compare a fine scull to a coastal scull is sort of to suggest that a
> Formula One car would actually be an ideal choice on a rally course!
>
> I am not sure whether James is specifically trying to break the
> English Channel record, as he then has to cycle and swim for the rest
> of the day, and he certainly hasn't chosen the ideal time of year -
> based on the timing of Sport Relief, not when he might have preferred
> to do it. Nevertheless, we're very excited to see how he gets on and
> wish him the best of luck. The boat is being delivered to James today
> and I'll be preflighting and discussing any optimisations with him
> before the crossing.
>
> =A0 Nick

And of course my esteemed colleague Bob Gullett should have had the
benefit of the appropriate veteran handicap. I would guess he's Vet D
or E. I haven't got the tables on me, but it must be worth around 20
minutes.

Caroline


30 Jan 2008 04:18:12
James Elder
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

On Jan 29, 11:38=A0pm, paul_v_sm...@hotmail.com wrote:

> So they rowed along together? =A0Was it a sprint finish to see who would
> get credit for the "Record"?

Precisely that. They'd been plotting it together for ages, waiting
for the right conjunction of conditions. They sculled across
together, but there was no question of Guin waiting for Bob at the
end. IIRC correctly, Bob capsized in the surf just before he landed.

Bob therefore has the Men's Record.

I think Guin was in a Resolute.


30 Jan 2008 12:21:36
Carl Douglas
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

carolinetu wrote:
> On Jan 30, 9:38 am, n...@burgashell.co.uk wrote:
>
>>Morning all
>>
>>James' Burgashell Coastal Scull (named Continental Challenge, not Blue
>>Moon as I was hoping for) is pretty much identical to our standard
>>Coastal Scull, with the addition of a small self-bailer to get rid of
>>water that will inevitably end up in the footwell. The boat is our
>>standard 4 piece construction, 3 layer single-skin carbon hull with
>>stateroom monocoque and two double skin canvases, in Sport Relief
>>colours.
>>
>>This boat class has been used to row around the Isle of Wight and is
>>the standard class for UK South Coast Racing. Our Coastal Sculls,
>>Doubles & Fours have become popular as replacements for the wooden
>>boats previously used. I will be following James across the Channel in
>>the support boat and writing an article about it for UK Rowing &
>>Regatta Magasine.
>>
>>This boat shape has evolved on the South Coast specifically to excel
>>in difficult coastal conditions, and the shape provides buoyancy in a
>>shorter hull length, which is more suitable in a short swell. To
>>compare a fine scull to a coastal scull is sort of to suggest that a
>>Formula One car would actually be an ideal choice on a rally course!
>>
>>I am not sure whether James is specifically trying to break the
>>English Channel record, as he then has to cycle and swim for the rest
>>of the day, and he certainly hasn't chosen the ideal time of year -
>>based on the timing of Sport Relief, not when he might have preferred
>>to do it. Nevertheless, we're very excited to see how he gets on and
>>wish him the best of luck. The boat is being delivered to James today
>>and I'll be preflighting and discussing any optimisations with him
>>before the crossing.
>>
>> Nick
>
>
> And of course my esteemed colleague Bob Gullett should have had the
> benefit of the appropriate veteran handicap. I would guess he's Vet D
> or E. I haven't got the tables on me, but it must be worth around 20
> minutes.
>
> Caroline

Bob was not looking to win. He was just doing the male escort bit,
ladies first, & acting as chaperon & protector to Guin against those
wild & woolly Frenchmen. Or he was until, on reaching France, a helpful
guy in the support boat thought it'd be handy to lift his rigger right
up, tipping him into the briny.

Cheers -
Carl

--
Carl Douglas Racing Shells -
Fine Small-Boats/AeRoWing Low-drag Riggers/Advanced Accessories
Write: Harris Boatyard, Laleham Reach, Chertsey KT16 8RP, UK
Email: carl@carldouglas.co.uk Tel: +44(0)1932-570946 Fax: -563682
URLs: www.carldouglas.co.uk (boats) & www.aerowing.co.uk (riggers)


30 Jan 2008 05:36:10
J Flory
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

On Jan 29, 11:31=A0am, Jake <jake.fr...@rya.org.uk > wrote:
> (like Guin did, although it was a
> Resolute and they were very sturdy logitundinally thanks to their I-
> beam thingy).

According to a friend who used to build them, Resolute 1x's don't have
an I-beam thingy. The original series was made in port and starboard
halves which were then bonded together. Each half had a vertical
flange to increase the bonding surface. These flanges did not extend
all the way from deck to keel but may have given the impression of an
I-beam thingy. The Canadian builders Mission are using this two-
halves construction. I believe Maas and Peinert use actual I-beam-
thingy construction.

Later Resolute 1x's were made more conventionally with a deck bonded
to a hull via an overlapping edge, as Hudson does.

AFAIK at the moment Resolute 1x's aren't made at all.


30 Jan 2008 10:05:45
boatie
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

sitting in James Cracknell's offices .... and so I asked them about
record breaking attempts... and they don't know!
They reckon it's unlikely he won't be trying for some sort of record
because apparently he already holds the "paddling a surfboard across
the Channel" record. [blimey who thought of that?]
But his main aim is to get to Africa.....

;-)


30 Jan 2008 10:38:02
Jake
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

Re: he certainly hasn't chosen the ideal time of year -
based on the timing of Sport Relief, not when he might have preferred
to do it.

I wonder of Mr Cracknell is aware that a coastal scull is pretty much
the same to balance as a river scull? I have both and can't tell the
difference, balance-wise. What you gain in balance from the wider hull
of the coastal boat, you lose through the higher C of G (the seat deck
is higher above the water in a coastal scull).

May I strongly suggest a pair of outriggers if he just wants to do it
with no bother about setting record times. I built a pair for my own
(Burgashell coastal) scull for my attempt at circumnavigating the IOW,
but didn't use them as it was flat calm with a great forecast. A
decision I lived to regret 6 hours/ 42 nautical miles later when the
sea breeze kicked in in the Solent. I left them at home because I
thought people in the Hants and Dorset ARA would consider it
'cheating' and thought there was a chance of completing it without
them. They can be adjusted up or down so they don't touch the water in
normal rowing on flat water (=no drag), but are there when the s'''t
hits the fan. I built them in a day. I believe proprietory brands are
available, like the adaptive people use, though these are shorter so
probably would stop the boat when you hit the face or back of a wave
with one (the outriggers, not the adaptive people!). Mine are about 8
feet long with a nice bit of rocker, and flat underneath so they just
slap from wavetop to wavetop.... Which is what you want. As a test I
rowed from Southampton to Southsea and back with them in a force 4
with occasional breaking waves, and they performed admirably, but
ultimately in big breaking waves from the side I reckon they'd tear
the saxe boards off. (They are bolted through the boards, but not in
the rigger reinforcement locations)

I'd show you a picture of me standing up in the finished contraption
on the water with no blades if the Wayback Machine web archive still
worked (what happened to it, it was brilliant!) (anyone know a web
archive anymore that might have www.southamptonrowing.org on it?).
Anyway, if you can find it archived there's a piccie of my outriggers
on there somewhere along with the tale of the ill fated IOW
circumnavigation attempt. I stopped paying the domain registration
fees years ago so it's not live.





30 Jan 2008 10:39:26
Jake
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

On Jan 30, 1:36 pm, J Flory <john.fl...@snet.net > wrote:
> On Jan 29, 11:31 am, Jake <jake.fr...@rya.org.uk> wrote:
>
> > (like Guin did, although it was a
> > Resolute and they were very sturdy logitundinally thanks to their I-
> > beam thingy).
>
> According to a friend who used to build them, Resolute 1x's don't have
> an I-beam thingy. The original series was made in port and starboard
> halves which were then bonded together. Each half had a vertical
> flange to increase the bonding surface. These flanges did not extend
> all the way from deck to keel but may have given the impression of an
> I-beam thingy. The Canadian builders Mission are using this two-
> halves construction. I believe Maas and Peinert use actual I-beam-
> thingy construction.
>
> Later Resolute 1x's were made more conventionally with a deck bonded
> to a hull via an overlapping edge, as Hudson does.
>
> AFAIK at the moment Resolute 1x's aren't made at all.

For 'thingy' please read 'flange'


30 Jan 2008 19:57:12
Ted van de Weteringe
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

Jake wrote:
> I'd show you a picture of me standing up in the finished contraption
> on the water with no blades if the Wayback Machine web archive still
> worked (what happened to it, it was brilliant!) (anyone know a web
> archive anymore that might have www.southamptonrowing.org on it?).

http://web.archive.org/web/20051201011852/http://www.southamptonrowing.org/
No pictures, no underlying pages.


30 Jan 2008 19:39:25
Carl Douglas
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

Jake wrote:
> On Jan 30, 1:36 pm, J Flory <john.fl...@snet.net> wrote:
>
>>On Jan 29, 11:31 am, Jake <jake.fr...@rya.org.uk> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>(like Guin did, although it was a
>>>Resolute and they were very sturdy logitundinally thanks to their I-
>>>beam thingy).
>>
>>According to a friend who used to build them, Resolute 1x's don't have
>>an I-beam thingy. The original series was made in port and starboard
>>halves which were then bonded together. Each half had a vertical
>>flange to increase the bonding surface. These flanges did not extend
>>all the way from deck to keel but may have given the impression of an
>>I-beam thingy. The Canadian builders Mission are using this two-
>>halves construction. I believe Maas and Peinert use actual I-beam-
>>thingy construction.
>>
>>Later Resolute 1x's were made more conventionally with a deck bonded
>>to a hull via an overlapping edge, as Hudson does.
>>
>>AFAIK at the moment Resolute 1x's aren't made at all.
>
>
> For 'thingy' please read 'flange'

Either way, it sounds disgusting.

;)
C


01 Feb 2008 03:04:18
david.henderson@aea.be
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

On Jan 30, 10:38=A0am, n...@burgashell.co.uk wrote:
> Morning all
>
> [snip]
>
> I am not sure whether James is specifically trying to break the
> English Channel record, as he then has to cycle and swim for the rest
> of the day,
> =A0 Nick

Only if he manages to reach Gibraltar by nightfall...

Dave H



04 Feb 2008 03:46:28
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

Morning

James has checked the record (3 hours 35 minutes) and says he "might
have a go at that if there is a fair wind".

Nick



On 1 Feb, 11:04, "david.hender...@aea.be" <david.hender...@aea.be >
wrote:
> On Jan 30, 10:38 am, n...@burgashell.co.uk wrote:
>
> > Morning all
>
> > [snip]
>
> > I am not sure whether James is specifically trying to break the
> > English Channel record, as he then has to cycle and swim for the rest
> > of the day,
> > Nick
>
> Only if he manages to reach Gibraltar by nightfall...
>
> Dave H



05 Feb 2008 00:39:17
Rachel Quarrell
Re: James Cracknell in a Burgashell

On Mon, 4 Feb 2008 nick@burgashell.co.uk wrote:

> Morning
>
> James has checked the record (3 hours 35 minutes) and says he "might
> have a go at that if there is a fair wind".
>
> Nick

Not quite - 3hrs 22 is the men's solo record, and 3hrs 14 is the
women's/open record (ie Guin).

Me was there.... Water like rippled silk nearly all the way across, zero
wind (you don't really want it in the Channel) and a bit of luck in terms
of Guin not having to stop while big freighters passed. Still think she
could have done it much quicker if she'd aimed for the east properly
instead of nearly going too far west. Very deceptive, the angles, and it
isn't easy to communicate. She had a very good Channel pilot, too.

I'll remind James he has to beat a girl to get the record. :-)

RQ.