20 Jul 2006 06:16:24
RigasMinho
Noob Help

Hey -
I'm looking to get into this sport even more so.

Here's the things I have questions about:

1) Whats the difference between a high pressure tank and a low
pressure tank?
- Is there a reason why anyone would ever want a low pressure tank when
it would make your shots go faster / farther?

2) When buying an air tank and it says
68ci 3000 psi or 48 ci 3000 what is the main difference between these
two tanks?

3) Also when you're playing on a field and they say to you "Hey you
need to lower your gun so it shots slower"

is that by the tank or the gun itself - that would lower the speed of
each shot?

4) I was looking at the tipman 98 - what is so good about the ACT
function?

All right let me knwo thanks



20 Jul 2006 13:59:51
Dave Lyon
Re: Noob Help


"RigasMinho" <minho.cho@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1153401384.198873.80320@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> Hey -
> I'm looking to get into this sport even more so.
>
> Here's the things I have questions about:
>
> 1) Whats the difference between a high pressure tank and a low
> pressure tank?

A high pressure tank's output is about 800 psi. A low pressure tank is
around 450 psi.
Low end guns like the Tippmann line require 800 psi tanks.


> - Is there a reason why anyone would ever want a low pressure tank when
> it would make your shots go faster / farther?

You need to keep your velocity below 300 psi to be safe. Many high end guns
will double regulate the pressure for more accurate velocities. If you have
a gun that operates at 450 psi or below, it's better to use the low pressure
tank.

>
> 2) When buying an air tank and it says
> 68ci 3000 psi or 48 ci 3000 what is the main difference between these
> two tanks?

The 68 and the 48 represent the volume of the tank in cubic inches.
Obviously the 68 is larger, so you get more shots per tank. The 3000
represents the pressure of the tank. They also make 4500 psi and 5000 psi
tanks if you need more shots without getting a bigger tank.

>
> 3) Also when you're playing on a field and they say to you "Hey you
> need to lower your gun so it shots slower"
>
> is that by the tank or the gun itself - that would lower the speed of
> each shot?

Usually it's on the gun. Most low end guns use a preset tank. That meens
there is a regulator built into the tank that cannot be adjusted. The
Tippmann guns have a screw on the side that restricts the air flow in order
to slow down your velocity.


>
> 4) I was looking at the tipman 98 - what is so good about the ACT
> function?
>

Tippmanns are a good choice for a beginner. They are very dependable, and
hold their resale value well if you want to trade up later, or get out of
the game completely. It is possible with the 98 to outshoot a standard (or
even upgraded) hopper if you have an RT or E-grip installed. When that
happens, the bolt may fly forward and chop a ball in half that hasn't made
it into the breach yet. The ACT is supposed to prevent that from happening.




20 Jul 2006 07:09:03
RigasMinho
Re: Noob Help

The Tippman can you adjust the speed of the shot to be higher with the
screw setting?

Also - what exactly is a response trigger?

One more thing - wouldnt you want a high pressure tank in general to
give you more "power" for your gun's projectile?

Thanks
Dave Lyon wrote:
> "RigasMinho" <minho.cho@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1153401384.198873.80320@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> > Hey -
> > I'm looking to get into this sport even more so.
> >
> > Here's the things I have questions about:
> >
> > 1) Whats the difference between a high pressure tank and a low
> > pressure tank?
>
> A high pressure tank's output is about 800 psi. A low pressure tank is
> around 450 psi.
> Low end guns like the Tippmann line require 800 psi tanks.
>
>
> > - Is there a reason why anyone would ever want a low pressure tank when
> > it would make your shots go faster / farther?
>
> You need to keep your velocity below 300 psi to be safe. Many high end guns
> will double regulate the pressure for more accurate velocities. If you have
> a gun that operates at 450 psi or below, it's better to use the low pressure
> tank.
>
> >
> > 2) When buying an air tank and it says
> > 68ci 3000 psi or 48 ci 3000 what is the main difference between these
> > two tanks?
>
> The 68 and the 48 represent the volume of the tank in cubic inches.
> Obviously the 68 is larger, so you get more shots per tank. The 3000
> represents the pressure of the tank. They also make 4500 psi and 5000 psi
> tanks if you need more shots without getting a bigger tank.
>
> >
> > 3) Also when you're playing on a field and they say to you "Hey you
> > need to lower your gun so it shots slower"
> >
> > is that by the tank or the gun itself - that would lower the speed of
> > each shot?
>
> Usually it's on the gun. Most low end guns use a preset tank. That meens
> there is a regulator built into the tank that cannot be adjusted. The
> Tippmann guns have a screw on the side that restricts the air flow in order
> to slow down your velocity.
>
>
> >
> > 4) I was looking at the tipman 98 - what is so good about the ACT
> > function?
> >
>
> Tippmanns are a good choice for a beginner. They are very dependable, and
> hold their resale value well if you want to trade up later, or get out of
> the game completely. It is possible with the 98 to outshoot a standard (or
> even upgraded) hopper if you have an RT or E-grip installed. When that
> happens, the bolt may fly forward and chop a ball in half that hasn't made
> it into the breach yet. The ACT is supposed to prevent that from happening.



20 Jul 2006 14:24:48
Dave Lyon
Re: Noob Help


"RigasMinho" <minho.cho@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1153404543.113829.48180@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
> The Tippman can you adjust the speed of the shot to be higher with the
> screw setting?

Not exactly. A Tippmann valve allows a given amount of air to be discharged.
The adjustment screw can be screwed in to block the path of the air,
therefore slowing down the ball. The volume of air is not changed, only it's
speed. Depending on the weather, and your air source, a stock Tippmann
usually won't get much higher than about 315 fps.


>
> Also - what exactly is a response trigger?

An RT uses waste air to reset the trigger. If you hold the proper tension on
the trigger with your finger, it's basically like going full auto. When
properly tuned, and with a little practice, you can aproach 20 bps.

>
> One more thing - wouldnt you want a high pressure tank in general to
> give you more "power" for your gun's projectile?
>

No. It is not safe to shoot above 300 fps. If that's what you're trying to
achieve, somebody's going to beat you about the head and shoulders.
Low pressure guns can still achieve the maximum safe speed by using a higher
volume of air. It really depends on what your gun is designed for. High
pressure tanks can be used on the same guns that CO2 tanks are used on. Low
pressure tanks are usually reserved for more expensive equipment.




20 Jul 2006 10:59:32
pukindog
Re: Noob Help



>
> One more thing - wouldnt you want a high pressure tank in general to
> give you more "power" for your gun's projectile?
>

At commercial paintball fields, the velocity of all the projectiles
exiting paintball guns is restricted for safety reasons -- generally
this is around 300 fps (feet per second) or sometimes lower -- the
point being to limit the impact energy of the projectile.
In this respect, the output pressure of the tank is irrelevant to the
power of the projectile. Some paintball guns use higher pressure/lower
volume of gas to achieve the maximum allowed velocity, while some use
lower pressure/higher volume to do the same. It's simply a matter of
how a particular paintball gun functions, but the end product - the
velocity of the paintball - is the same. In otherwords, if you think
buying a high pressure tank gives you an advantage over your buddies,
that's not the way it works.
You can, of course, tune any paintball gun to shoot at higher
velocities, regardless of whether it is a "high" or "low" pressure gun.
However, it's simply not safe to do so. The safety equipment made for
paintball, as well as the human body, have their limitations and the
300 fps industry standard velocity limit is there for a reason.

Billy Goodman
www.pukindogspaintball.com



20 Jul 2006 11:20:38
RigasMinho
Re: Noob Help

What is a good entry level gun that would be good to kick some butt as
well.

The tippman looks good but doesnt look like you could use it in
tournament play and what not.

Someone suggested an ION
pukindog wrote:
> >
> > One more thing - wouldnt you want a high pressure tank in general to
> > give you more "power" for your gun's projectile?
> >
>
> At commercial paintball fields, the velocity of all the projectiles
> exiting paintball guns is restricted for safety reasons -- generally
> this is around 300 fps (feet per second) or sometimes lower -- the
> point being to limit the impact energy of the projectile.
> In this respect, the output pressure of the tank is irrelevant to the
> power of the projectile. Some paintball guns use higher pressure/lower
> volume of gas to achieve the maximum allowed velocity, while some use
> lower pressure/higher volume to do the same. It's simply a matter of
> how a particular paintball gun functions, but the end product - the
> velocity of the paintball - is the same. In otherwords, if you think
> buying a high pressure tank gives you an advantage over your buddies,
> that's not the way it works.
> You can, of course, tune any paintball gun to shoot at higher
> velocities, regardless of whether it is a "high" or "low" pressure gun.
> However, it's simply not safe to do so. The safety equipment made for
> paintball, as well as the human body, have their limitations and the
> 300 fps industry standard velocity limit is there for a reason.
>
> Billy Goodman
> www.pukindogspaintball.com



20 Jul 2006 20:31:21
Matt Moriearty
Re: Noob Help

RigasMinho wrote:
> What is a good entry level gun that would be good to kick some butt as
> well.
>
> The tippman looks good but doesnt look like you could use it in
> tournament play and what not.
>
> Someone suggested an ION

If you're just now starting, Tippman's the *only* thing I would suggest.

If you want to do local tournaments, slap on a drop-forward (Tippmans
are already a bit too long to wedge yourself behind bunkers)and an
e-grip, and it will fire as fast as any Ion. It will jerk around a bit
more, though--everything about the 98 and A5 is a bit heavy. No big
deal, unless you weigh about forty pounds.

If you want to do anything but small-time local tournaments you're 1)
out of your budget--an Ion would work in one, but I wouldn't put money
it would *stay* working long enough for the whole thing and 2) you're
gonna need to play a good while before entering. No matter what
Paintball Nation or the magazines say, tournament players *don't* use
the equipment they have because it 'makes them a better player'. They
use it because they trust those 'guns enough to not limit their ability
and because they're *paid* to use it.

Anyway. Ions are a little more labor-intensive to keep up. And, like
most SP equipment, have a few built-in flaws to get you to buy more
stuff for it. Tippmans just *work*. Every time, all the time. If it
doesn't, it's you're fault and the company will still send you
parts--usually free.

If your options are still open, check out Automags. They're usually
sorta ugly. And if you break it, it's a bit more complicated than a
Tippman to fix. But it's damn rare they do break, and they're about as
sturdy as a Tippman, quite a bit smaller, and with a good trigger and a
Lv10 bolt, will shoot as fast as an Ion, not break balls, and you won't
need any batteries in it. New ones run about as much as a Tippman A5,
and used ones can be had cheaper, but hold their cost fairly well.


20 Jul 2006 16:15:47
Big Habeeb
Re: Noob Help

I agree and disagree.
Go with an automag...they can be had for cheap, are extremely
upgradable, and out of the box will do you just fine for awhile, until
you really learn how to play.
They can be a little picky when running on co2 in cooler weather, but
as we're in the middle of the summer you may even be ok with co2 and an
expansion chamber (Any of you other old school guys remember those?
lol). The biggest PITA with automags, however, is their twist lock
barrel system - barrels are tough to come by and the like. Micromags,
while a bit more expensive, have cocker barrel threading, and are a
touch smaller. I believe AGD also now has a normal mag body with
cocker threading.

Like I said, out of the box will do ya for awhile...eventually you can
get in to upgrading to an RT valve, e-trigger frame and nitro, but for
starters? A mag is a great gun. Easy to maintain. Where I disagree
with Matt is that I've found them even easier to work with than tippman
for the simple reason that the mag's 'moving parts' are essentially a
regulator. There's not much to it...pull out the seals, put in new
ones, put it back together. You can pretty much master assembly /
disassembly and maintenance of a mag inside of 3 minutes.

Me? I've had the same minimag kicking around in my paintball bag for a
good 8 years now. Nothin much to it really...the very exciting 10 hole
mod, foamie bolt, and a 2 finger benchmark trigger. That, and a host
of random barrels is all I've ever bothered to do to it...and while
it's not my top performer or top choice of marker, I always know it's
there and will work flawlessly if I need it (it did get its chance at
skyball when my cocker was not behaving for me).

Big Habeeb (a.k.a. Mitch)
Coming soon to a town near you!

Matt Moriearty wrote:
> RigasMinho wrote:
> > What is a good entry level gun that would be good to kick some butt as
> > well.
> >
> > The tippman looks good but doesnt look like you could use it in
> > tournament play and what not.
> >
> > Someone suggested an ION
>
> If you're just now starting, Tippman's the *only* thing I would suggest.
>
> If you want to do local tournaments, slap on a drop-forward (Tippmans
> are already a bit too long to wedge yourself behind bunkers)and an
> e-grip, and it will fire as fast as any Ion. It will jerk around a bit
> more, though--everything about the 98 and A5 is a bit heavy. No big
> deal, unless you weigh about forty pounds.
>
> If you want to do anything but small-time local tournaments you're 1)
> out of your budget--an Ion would work in one, but I wouldn't put money
> it would *stay* working long enough for the whole thing and 2) you're
> gonna need to play a good while before entering. No matter what
> Paintball Nation or the magazines say, tournament players *don't* use
> the equipment they have because it 'makes them a better player'. They
> use it because they trust those 'guns enough to not limit their ability
> and because they're *paid* to use it.
>
> Anyway. Ions are a little more labor-intensive to keep up. And, like
> most SP equipment, have a few built-in flaws to get you to buy more
> stuff for it. Tippmans just *work*. Every time, all the time. If it
> doesn't, it's you're fault and the company will still send you
> parts--usually free.
>
> If your options are still open, check out Automags. They're usually
> sorta ugly. And if you break it, it's a bit more complicated than a
> Tippman to fix. But it's damn rare they do break, and they're about as
> sturdy as a Tippman, quite a bit smaller, and with a good trigger and a
> Lv10 bolt, will shoot as fast as an Ion, not break balls, and you won't
> need any batteries in it. New ones run about as much as a Tippman A5,
> and used ones can be had cheaper, but hold their cost fairly well.



20 Jul 2006 16:25:51
Big Habeeb
Re: Noob Help

Something like this might do ya...everything you need to get started,
plus a couple little extras so you look good doing it.


http://cgi.ebay.com/Mini-Mag-Auto-mag-Automag-loaded_W0QQitemZ140008528962QQihZ004QQcategoryZ47245QQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

Big Habeeb (a.k.a. Mitch)
Coming soon to a town near you!

Big Habeeb wrote:
> I agree and disagree.
> Go with an automag...they can be had for cheap, are extremely
> upgradable, and out of the box will do you just fine for awhile, until
> you really learn how to play.
> They can be a little picky when running on co2 in cooler weather, but
> as we're in the middle of the summer you may even be ok with co2 and an
> expansion chamber (Any of you other old school guys remember those?
> lol). The biggest PITA with automags, however, is their twist lock
> barrel system - barrels are tough to come by and the like. Micromags,
> while a bit more expensive, have cocker barrel threading, and are a
> touch smaller. I believe AGD also now has a normal mag body with
> cocker threading.
>
> Like I said, out of the box will do ya for awhile...eventually you can
> get in to upgrading to an RT valve, e-trigger frame and nitro, but for
> starters? A mag is a great gun. Easy to maintain. Where I disagree
> with Matt is that I've found them even easier to work with than tippman
> for the simple reason that the mag's 'moving parts' are essentially a
> regulator. There's not much to it...pull out the seals, put in new
> ones, put it back together. You can pretty much master assembly /
> disassembly and maintenance of a mag inside of 3 minutes.
>
> Me? I've had the same minimag kicking around in my paintball bag for a
> good 8 years now. Nothin much to it really...the very exciting 10 hole
> mod, foamie bolt, and a 2 finger benchmark trigger. That, and a host
> of random barrels is all I've ever bothered to do to it...and while
> it's not my top performer or top choice of marker, I always know it's
> there and will work flawlessly if I need it (it did get its chance at
> skyball when my cocker was not behaving for me).
>
> Big Habeeb (a.k.a. Mitch)
> Coming soon to a town near you!
>
> Matt Moriearty wrote:
> > RigasMinho wrote:
> > > What is a good entry level gun that would be good to kick some butt as
> > > well.
> > >
> > > The tippman looks good but doesnt look like you could use it in
> > > tournament play and what not.
> > >
> > > Someone suggested an ION
> >
> > If you're just now starting, Tippman's the *only* thing I would suggest.
> >
> > If you want to do local tournaments, slap on a drop-forward (Tippmans
> > are already a bit too long to wedge yourself behind bunkers)and an
> > e-grip, and it will fire as fast as any Ion. It will jerk around a bit
> > more, though--everything about the 98 and A5 is a bit heavy. No big
> > deal, unless you weigh about forty pounds.
> >
> > If you want to do anything but small-time local tournaments you're 1)
> > out of your budget--an Ion would work in one, but I wouldn't put money
> > it would *stay* working long enough for the whole thing and 2) you're
> > gonna need to play a good while before entering. No matter what
> > Paintball Nation or the magazines say, tournament players *don't* use
> > the equipment they have because it 'makes them a better player'. They
> > use it because they trust those 'guns enough to not limit their ability
> > and because they're *paid* to use it.
> >
> > Anyway. Ions are a little more labor-intensive to keep up. And, like
> > most SP equipment, have a few built-in flaws to get you to buy more
> > stuff for it. Tippmans just *work*. Every time, all the time. If it
> > doesn't, it's you're fault and the company will still send you
> > parts--usually free.
> >
> > If your options are still open, check out Automags. They're usually
> > sorta ugly. And if you break it, it's a bit more complicated than a
> > Tippman to fix. But it's damn rare they do break, and they're about as
> > sturdy as a Tippman, quite a bit smaller, and with a good trigger and a
> > Lv10 bolt, will shoot as fast as an Ion, not break balls, and you won't
> > need any batteries in it. New ones run about as much as a Tippman A5,
> > and used ones can be had cheaper, but hold their cost fairly well.



21 Jul 2006 03:15:39
Matt Moriearty
Re: Noob Help

Big Habeeb wrote:
> I agree and disagree.
> Go with an automag...they can be had for cheap, are extremely
> upgradable, and out of the box will do you just fine for awhile, until
> you really learn how to play.

Very good, all of it.

My complaint about the 'tougher' upkeep is that it's possible to
misalign a few parts, especially with an RT or ULT trigger. Nothing
major, but I know I'm mechanically inclined, and not many people I talk
to on the field are. But, oh, they're determined to take stuff apart anyway.

As for the threads, yeah, finding 'mag barrels can suck. But you can
occasionally eBay them relatively cheap, or catch them on clearance at
some sites or stores. Plus, like he said, the Micros come with 'cocker
threads, but they do cost a bit more. Otherwise, for another custom
look, some companies make bodies, and AGD even has their own ULT bodies,
which you can buy as whole 'guns. Still, price might be an issue.

As for the trigger, I personally--and this is just me. I in no way scoff
at anyone else--stay away from battery-powered stuff that doesn't run a
solenoid. A popular mod lately is the pneumatic trigger. All the
reliability of a mag, you could drop it in the river, and you can still
get a mouse-click trigger pull. With my limited experience, nice and
sharp, too. Not 'Oh, it fired, I must have pulled it' and no bouncing.


21 Jul 2006 02:26:35
Lorraine
Re: Noob Help

I was going to go with the 98 custom pro with ACT as well.. but I ended
up choosing the A5 because

1) The cyclone feed is built into the A5 and it works great! No need to
buy a better hopper
2) The A5 is much easier to take apart than the 98 custom pros.
3) The price difference is not that much... the A5 is the latest and
greatest Tippmann.

I love my A5, and I don't have a problem using it in speedball games.
It's a great all around gun. I would recommend that you upgrade to a
better barrel when buying either gun, the stock barrels tend to be
pretty inaccurate.

RigasMinho wrote:
> Hey -
> I'm looking to get into this sport even more so.
>
> Here's the things I have questions about:
>
> 1) Whats the difference between a high pressure tank and a low
> pressure tank?
> - Is there a reason why anyone would ever want a low pressure tank when
> it would make your shots go faster / farther?
>
> 2) When buying an air tank and it says
> 68ci 3000 psi or 48 ci 3000 what is the main difference between these
> two tanks?
>
> 3) Also when you're playing on a field and they say to you "Hey you
> need to lower your gun so it shots slower"
>
> is that by the tank or the gun itself - that would lower the speed of
> each shot?
>
> 4) I was looking at the tipman 98 - what is so good about the ACT
> function?
>
> All right let me knwo thanks



21 Jul 2006 05:32:37
Big Habeeb
Re: Noob Help

Hey, like I said, absolutely NOTHING wrong with any of the tippman
guns. They make great markers and have a phenomenal reputation. My
personal preference is to go with the more compact "tourney style" of a
mag. And no, I'm not saying noone uses tippmann guns in a tournament,
so don't jump on me please :p

The fact is, people who have just gotten into the games over the last 4
or 5 years don't remember when automags were THE gun. Cockers were
there, but required so much work to make decent out of the box, that
mags still pretty much ruled the field. You actually had to drop a
good thousand bucks to get a cocker that wasn't going to result in
constant headaches...unlike today where 300 bucks gets you a damn fine
cocker (and yes, I do believe cockers to be VASTLY superior to mags).
Mags have fallen off the charts in a big way, because of the fact (in
my opinion) they aren't being marketed correctly. AGD is still hoping
to grab the tourney / hardcore scenario crowd (as shown by the e-mag
and tac-one). What they need to realize is that there are some AMAZING
hardcore scenario guns and tourney guns out there...but they could
still take a nice share of the rec ball market, if they aimed for that
crowd. Think about all the spyder/pirahna clones out there in the 150
- 200 dollar range. Now, if you could get a spyder TL or an automag
for the same price, which would you choose? Seems pretty simple to me.


See, companies like Kingman realized early on their role in the
paintball industry. The em-1 aside, Kingman has never really claimed
to make a marker to compete with the big boys in terms of tourney level
equipment. What they have done is rattle out some 30 models of the
exact same marker: to appeal to just about everyone in recball land.
Tippmann has done the same thing: while their factory teams DO shoot
their guns, lets be honest about it: Tippmann DIRECTLY targets the rec
ball / rental market...and they do it extremely well. AGD hasn't come
to grips with the fact that their marker is outdated. They've had
virtually the exact same design for an awfully long time...and even
with the addition of e-frames etc., it's still the same design, with
the some positives and the same drawbacks. The e-mag? Well, to be
frank...I was not impressed. it's an RT with a shorter
trigger...that's it. It still has drop off issues, and quite frankly I
found it to be quite unwieldy (particularly with a warp feed bolted
onto the thing).

In short, I'd like to see AGD change their marketing style and get
their name out there as a top name in rec ball. Advertise in Action
Pursuit Games an other magazines generally directed towards the rec
ball community. Show up at rec ball fields and wholesale out some of
your gear. Get it back on the fields. It is so rare to see the mags
out there now that it's no wonder that newer players who see my minimag
often say "Hey, what is that?"...a shame, considering that as recently
as 7 or 8 years ago the automag still ruled the field...both for
tourney ball and rec ball.

Big Habeeb (a.k.a. Mitch)
Coming soon to a town near you!

Lorraine wrote:
> I was going to go with the 98 custom pro with ACT as well.. but I ended
> up choosing the A5 because
>
> 1) The cyclone feed is built into the A5 and it works great! No need to
> buy a better hopper
> 2) The A5 is much easier to take apart than the 98 custom pros.
> 3) The price difference is not that much... the A5 is the latest and
> greatest Tippmann.
>
> I love my A5, and I don't have a problem using it in speedball games.
> It's a great all around gun. I would recommend that you upgrade to a
> better barrel when buying either gun, the stock barrels tend to be
> pretty inaccurate.
>
> RigasMinho wrote:
> > Hey -
> > I'm looking to get into this sport even more so.
> >
> > Here's the things I have questions about:
> >
> > 1) Whats the difference between a high pressure tank and a low
> > pressure tank?
> > - Is there a reason why anyone would ever want a low pressure tank when
> > it would make your shots go faster / farther?
> >
> > 2) When buying an air tank and it says
> > 68ci 3000 psi or 48 ci 3000 what is the main difference between these
> > two tanks?
> >
> > 3) Also when you're playing on a field and they say to you "Hey you
> > need to lower your gun so it shots slower"
> >
> > is that by the tank or the gun itself - that would lower the speed of
> > each shot?
> >
> > 4) I was looking at the tipman 98 - what is so good about the ACT
> > function?
> >
> > All right let me knwo thanks



21 Jul 2006 13:58:19
Nobby
Re: Noob Help

As I have allways been preached too, it's better to start off the way you
mean to go on in something. In this case will you be happy in an odd game
here and there or for loads of use and fast play ie:- Tournements?

Don't go for the shinny, looks like it has lots of bits that do nothing for
performance.
Me and my son both have JT 3.5s (Spyder clones).
The problem is that the grass is always greener on the other side of the
hill for both of us.
These markers have flaws in lots of places, and there is lots of upgrades to
fix them, but apart from a modded marker it's is a Spyder based gun that
after ironing out the problems (if you know what your doing), it will be
cheaper to save more money and go for a better marker.

Tippmanns regardless of type will run with little or no problems from the
box. On a very rare occasion there may be a bad one out there, but it will
serve you well for years to come, has lots of upgrades, and Tippmann pride
them self's on service and after sales.
They are good all rounders and respected site operators world wide and can
take a lot of abuse and fairly accurate for a beginner. Maybe better for
woods than tournament due to the game play, but still good all rounder.

Q. Is this what you want from a marker?

If you are after a more accurate marker at reasonable priceing to tournament
entry level but not the fast rates of fire maybe an Autococker is more
suitable, or an Ion with a barrel upgrade for faster rates around 17bps.
Both of these I suggest be accompanied with a hopper like an Egg or Halo B

Q. Is this what you want from a marker?

Nobby





21 Jul 2006 14:40:42
Tom Greening
Re: Noob Help

Matt Moriearty wrote:
> Big Habeeb wrote:
>> I agree and disagree.
>> Go with an automag...they can be had for cheap, are extremely
>> upgradable, and out of the box will do you just fine for awhile, until
>> you really learn how to play.
>
> Very good, all of it.
>


> As for the trigger, I personally--and this is just me. I in no way scoff
> at anyone else--stay away from battery-powered stuff that doesn't run a
> solenoid. A popular mod lately is the pneumatic trigger. All the
> reliability of a mag, you could drop it in the river, and you can still
> get a mouse-click trigger pull. With my limited experience, nice and
> sharp, too. Not 'Oh, it fired, I must have pulled it' and no bouncing.


I remember a guy who back around 95 or so (guessing) took your basic
automag and made it select fire semi/full auto. To "select" all you had
to do was hold the trigger. Semi worked as usual. Squeeze the trigger
as fast as you could. The slick thing was that ALL the required
components fit inside the standard grip frame. Full auto rate could be
adjusted with a mini screwdriver through a hole in the grip. This was
all accomplished pneumatically with not a battery in sight, nor a bunch
of external hoses.

Shockers were just getting started and sucked so back it wasn't funny,
and the angel was still in the hands of AssBeagle. I can't remember for
sure but I believe the guys name was Dave Slane. If he was of a mind,
I'd bet he could market his design these days.