26 Dec 2006 17:24:31
Ben.
The Godfather of Augusta...

...with a simple "I'm going away" reposes and dies:

http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Music/12/26/james.brown.ap/index.html



26 Dec 2006 20:54:02
annika1980
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


Ben. wrote:
> ...with a simple "I'm going away" reposes and dies:
>
> http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Music/12/26/james.brown.ap/index.html

I guess Charles Howell III will now inherit the title of "The most
overrated Augustan."



26 Dec 2006 20:58:06
annika1980
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


Ben. wrote:
> ...with a simple "I'm going away" reposes and dies:
>
> http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Music/12/26/james.brown.ap/index.html

I guess Charles Howell III will now inherit the title of "The most
overrated Augustan."



26 Dec 2006 21:02:10
annika1980
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


Ben. wrote:
> ...with a simple "I'm going away" reposes and dies:
>
> http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Music/12/26/james.brown.ap/index.html

Papa's Got a Brand New Corpse.



27 Dec 2006 06:40:32
Chris Bellomy
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

annika1980 <annika1980@aol.com > wrote:
:
: Ben. wrote:
: > ...with a simple "I'm going away" reposes and dies:
: >
: > http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Music/12/26/james.brown.ap/index.html
:
: I guess Charles Howell III will now inherit the title of "The most
: overrated Augustan."

Troll. I *know* you don't even come close to believing this.

--
Chris Bellomy
C-List Charter Member
http://clist.org/


27 Dec 2006 05:36:32
Da Ringer.
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

I've lived in Augusta for all of my 47 years.

James Brown was more of an embarassment than an asset to Augusta.

J.B. was always in trouble for wife beating, drugs and other domestic
disturbances.

How in the hell can he pull a shotgun on an auditorium full of people, take
the police on a chase where they shoot the tires out on his truck and then
have the Augusta City Council name the damn Civic Center after him.

BTW.... the Augusta City Council is comprised mostly of "brothas".

I'm glad the SOB is gone and Augusta is better off with him gone.

Da Ringer


"Ben." <kombi45@yahoo.com > wrote in message
news:1167182671.763190.103660@n51g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> ...with a simple "I'm going away" reposes and dies:
>
> http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Music/12/26/james.brown.ap/index.html
>




27 Dec 2006 05:13:17
annika1980
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


Chris Bellomy wrote:
>> : I guess Charles Howell III will now inherit the title of "The most
> : overrated Augustan."
>
> Troll. I *know* you don't even come close to believing this.


You think it should be Da Ringer?



27 Dec 2006 09:55:59
John van der Pflum
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

On 26 Dec 2006 21:02:10 -0800, "annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com >
wrote:

>
>Ben. wrote:
>> ...with a simple "I'm going away" reposes and dies:
>>
>> http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Music/12/26/james.brown.ap/index.html
>
>Papa's Got a Brand New Corpse.

Ugh. That was bad. Funny, but bad. :-)
--

jvdp
http://www.rsgcincinnati.com


27 Dec 2006 07:43:54
Ben.
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



On Dec 27, 4:36 am, "Da Ringer." <DaRin...@nowhere.net > wrote:
> I've lived in Augusta for all of my 47 years.
>
> James Brown was more of an embarassment than an asset to Augusta.
>
> J.B. was always in trouble for wife beating, drugs and other domestic
> disturbances.
>
> How in the hell can he pull a shotgun on an auditorium full of people, take
> the police on a chase where they shoot the tires out on his truck and then
> have the Augusta City Council name the damn Civic Center after him.
>
> BTW.... the Augusta City Council is comprised mostly of "brothas".
>
> I'm glad the SOB is gone and Augusta is better off with him gone.
>
> Da Ringer

I see The National isn't the only hot spot for ignorant racist pricks
in Augusta.



27 Dec 2006 09:45:04
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


Ben. wrote:
> On Dec 27, 4:36 am, "Da Ringer." <DaRin...@nowhere.net> wrote:
> > I've lived in Augusta for all of my 47 years.
> >
> > James Brown was more of an embarassment than an asset to Augusta.
> >
> > J.B. was always in trouble for wife beating, drugs and other domestic
> > disturbances.
> >
> > How in the hell can he pull a shotgun on an auditorium full of people, take
> > the police on a chase where they shoot the tires out on his truck and then
> > have the Augusta City Council name the damn Civic Center after him.
> >
> > BTW.... the Augusta City Council is comprised mostly of "brothas".
> >
> > I'm glad the SOB is gone and Augusta is better off with him gone.
> >
> > Da Ringer
>
> I see The National isn't the only hot spot for ignorant racist pricks
> in Augusta.

Exactly what did John say that constitutes racism. Ok....perhaps the
word "african-american" should be substituted for "brutha" but race is
worth noting why a Civic Center was named about him, despite Brown's
crimes.

The same applies for the racial makeup of OJ's jury, which is why that
SOB is free. Same kind of white jury prejudice was applied to the
white cops who beat up Rodney King.

Fact is....racism exists, not only in ostracizing but in Brown's case,
honoring someone who didn't deserve it.

Brown was a punk....period.

-Greg



27 Dec 2006 19:49:34
Chris Bellomy
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

Dene <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote:

: Brown was a punk....period.

Brown was a punk. But not "period." He was a lot of other things,
too. The most talented often are also the most troubled -- the
thing that drives the trouble also drives the talent. It's just
a fact of the human condition.

--
Chris Bellomy
C-List Charter Member
http://clist.org/


27 Dec 2006 15:20:04
John van der Pflum
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 19:49:34 GMT, Chris Bellomy
<puevf@tbbqfubj.arg.invalid > wrote:


>The most talented often are also the most troubled

Well, **that** explains why you are steady as a rock.
--

jvdp
http://www.rsgcincinnati.com


27 Dec 2006 12:39:35
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


John van der Pflum wrote:
> On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 19:49:34 GMT, Chris Bellomy
> <puevf@tbbqfubj.arg.invalid> wrote:
>
>
> >The most talented often are also the most troubled
>
> Well, **that** explains why you are steady as a rock.
> --
>
> jvdp
> http://www.rsgcincinnati.com

Yer full of piss and vinegar today, John. That's three LOL's in three
hours. Not bad!

-Greg



27 Dec 2006 12:43:40
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


Chris Bellomy wrote:
> Dene <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote:
>
> : Brown was a punk....period.
>
> Brown was a punk. But not "period." He was a lot of other things,
> too. The most talented often are also the most troubled -- the
> thing that drives the trouble also drives the talent. It's just
> a fact of the human condition.
>

Fair enough. I'd feel better about the man had he acknowledged,
recanted his particular human condition. Instead, he's Mr. Celebrity
when he gets out of prison. A man who hits a woman is very low on my
totem pole. Only thing lower are those who hurt children.

-Greg



27 Dec 2006 15:50:34
John van der Pflum
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

On 27 Dec 2006 12:39:35 -0800, "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote:

>
>John van der Pflum wrote:
>> On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 19:49:34 GMT, Chris Bellomy
>> <puevf@tbbqfubj.arg.invalid> wrote:
>>
>>
>> >The most talented often are also the most troubled
>>
>> Well, **that** explains why you are steady as a rock.
>> --
>>
>> jvdp
>> http://www.rsgcincinnati.com
>
>Yer full of piss and vinegar today, John. That's three LOL's in three
>hours. Not bad!
>
>-Greg

I guess I better talking my usual gibberish, then. I'm WAAAAY over my
quota.
--

jvdp
http://www.rsgcincinnati.com


27 Dec 2006 21:45:25
Chris Bellomy
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

John van der Pflum <nowhammymyspammy@bite.org > wrote:
: On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 19:49:34 GMT, Chris Bellomy
: <puevf@tbbqfubj.arg.invalid > wrote:
:
:
: >The most talented often are also the most troubled
:
: Well, **that** explains why you are steady as a rock.

1. Bite me.
2. Yeah, pretty much.

--
Chris Bellomy
C-List Charter Member
http://clist.org/


27 Dec 2006 14:49:57
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


John van der Pflum wrote:
> On Wed, 27 Dec 2006 19:49:34 GMT, Chris Bellomy
> <puevf@tbbqfubj.arg.invalid> wrote:
>
>
> >The most talented often are also the most troubled
>
> Well, **that** explains why you are steady as a rock.
> --
>
> jvdp
> http://www.rsgcincinnati.com

Ah....Chris was FaLuuuumed once again! : >

-Greg



27 Dec 2006 16:20:09
The_Professor
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


Dene wrote:
> Chris Bellomy wrote:
> > Dene <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote:
> >
> > : Brown was a punk....period.
> >
> > Brown was a punk. But not "period." He was a lot of other things,
> > too. The most talented often are also the most troubled -- the
> > thing that drives the trouble also drives the talent. It's just
> > a fact of the human condition.
> >
>
> Fair enough. I'd feel better about the man had he acknowledged,
> recanted his particular human condition. Instead, he's Mr. Celebrity
> when he gets out of prison. A man who hits a woman is very low on my
> totem pole. Only thing lower are those who hurt children.
>

I didn't see much talent there. I never liked his music, and always
wondered what people saw in it. Interesting that this soulless form of
music was called soul!



27 Dec 2006 18:20:40
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


The_Professor wrote:
> Dene wrote:
> > Chris Bellomy wrote:
> > > Dene <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote:
> > >
> > > : Brown was a punk....period.
> > >
> > > Brown was a punk. But not "period." He was a lot of other things,
> > > too. The most talented often are also the most troubled -- the
> > > thing that drives the trouble also drives the talent. It's just
> > > a fact of the human condition.
> > >
> >
> > Fair enough. I'd feel better about the man had he acknowledged,
> > recanted his particular human condition. Instead, he's Mr. Celebrity
> > when he gets out of prison. A man who hits a woman is very low on my
> > totem pole. Only thing lower are those who hurt children.
> >
>
> I didn't see much talent there. I never liked his music, and always
> wondered what people saw in it. Interesting that this soulless form of
> music was called soul!

His dance moves were impressive, especially since he was able to
perform them in his later years.

-Greg



27 Dec 2006 20:49:28
Lloyd Parsons
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

In article <1167272440.031182.17870@73g2000cwn.googlegroups.com >,
"Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote:

> The_Professor wrote:
> > Dene wrote:
> > > Chris Bellomy wrote:
> > > > Dene <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote:
> > > >
> > > > : Brown was a punk....period.
> > > >
> > > > Brown was a punk. But not "period." He was a lot of other things,
> > > > too. The most talented often are also the most troubled -- the
> > > > thing that drives the trouble also drives the talent. It's just
> > > > a fact of the human condition.
> > > >
> > >
> > > Fair enough. I'd feel better about the man had he acknowledged,
> > > recanted his particular human condition. Instead, he's Mr. Celebrity
> > > when he gets out of prison. A man who hits a woman is very low on my
> > > totem pole. Only thing lower are those who hurt children.
> > >
> >
> > I didn't see much talent there. I never liked his music, and always
> > wondered what people saw in it. Interesting that this soulless form of
> > music was called soul!
>
> His dance moves were impressive, especially since he was able to
> perform them in his later years.
>
> -Greg

They certainly were. I had the opportunity to see James Brown and the
Famous Flames in Memphis in 1965. Me and my date were the only whites I
saw there.

But the music and the show was fantastic. He always put on a very
complete show. His music was amazing and the acting that went with it
was just superb.

He was definitely a major contributor to the rock scene over lots of
years. And when you consider his background and upbringing, it is
unreal that he was able to overcome much of it to excel in his chosen
profession.

You may not miss him, but I certainly will.


28 Dec 2006 06:40:39
Chris Bellomy
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

Dene <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote:
:
: The_Professor wrote:
: > Dene wrote:
: > > Chris Bellomy wrote:
: > > > Dene <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote:
: > > >
: > > > : Brown was a punk....period.
: > > >
: > > > Brown was a punk. But not "period." He was a lot of other things,
: > > > too. The most talented often are also the most troubled -- the
: > > > thing that drives the trouble also drives the talent. It's just
: > > > a fact of the human condition.
: > > >
: > >
: > > Fair enough. I'd feel better about the man had he acknowledged,
: > > recanted his particular human condition. Instead, he's Mr. Celebrity
: > > when he gets out of prison. A man who hits a woman is very low on my
: > > totem pole. Only thing lower are those who hurt children.
: > >
: >
: > I didn't see much talent there. I never liked his music, and always
: > wondered what people saw in it. Interesting that this soulless form of
: > music was called soul!
:
: His dance moves were impressive, especially since he was able to
: perform them in his later years.

He was also an amazing singer for his genre. I don't think Rob
likes that genre at all, which is his right, but the influence
that James Brown had on R&B (not Randy, the other R&B), soul
and funk was immense. "Please Please Please" was just a tour
de force, an amazing performance.

I say that understanding that he was a miserable human being
and brought a lot of misery to the people closest to him. But
he also brought people a lot of transcendent joy through his
music. A world without James Brown would have been a duller
thing.

--
Chris Bellomy
C-List Charter Member
http://clist.org/


28 Dec 2006 09:01:02
bill-o
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


On 27-Dec-2006, John van der Pflum <nowhammymyspammy@bite.org > wrote:

> >The most talented often are also the most troubled
>
> Well, **that** explains why you are steady as a rock.

Nice shot (skinny butwipe)!

--
bill-o

A "gimme" can best be defined as an agreement between
two golfers neither of whom can putt very well.


28 Dec 2006 09:03:12
bill-o
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


On 27-Dec-2006, Lloyd Parsons <lloydparsons@mac.com > wrote:

> They certainly were. I had the opportunity to see James Brown and the
> Famous Flames in Memphis in 1965. Me and my date were the only whites I
> saw there.

I saw him 20 some odd years later and he still did all the moves and, as you
said, put on a complete show, one that didn't require a buzz to be
appreiciated!

--
bill-o

A "gimme" can best be defined as an agreement between
two golfers neither of whom can putt very well.


28 Dec 2006 05:14:13
Birdie Bill
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



On Dec 27, 8:55 am, John van der Pflum <nowhammymyspa...@bite.org >
wrote:
> On 26 Dec 2006 21:02:10 -0800, "annika1980" <annika1...@aol.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> >Ben. wrote:
> >> ...with a simple "I'm going away" reposes and dies:
>
> >>http://www.cnn.com/2006/SHOWBIZ/Music/12/26/james.brown.ap/index.html
>
> >Papa's Got a Brand New Corpse.Ugh. That was bad. Funny, but bad. :-)
> --

I feel dead,
as stiff as wood...



28 Dec 2006 15:25:42
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"Chris Bellomy" <puevf@tbbqfubj.arg.invalid > wrote in message
news:0T3o17fbIbglN34@redshark.goodshow.net...
> Dene <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote:
>
> : Brown was a punk....period.
>
> Brown was a punk. But not "period." He was a lot of other things,
> too. The most talented often are also the most troubled -- the
> thing that drives the trouble also drives the talent. It's just
> a fact of the human condition.


I wasn't really a James Brown fan, although I'm quick to acknowledge the
influence he had on the African-American community. His "I'm Black and I'm
Proud" song in the 1960s helped to instill pride in certain people, if even
in no other way than to give them a rallying cry. It's fair to say that
timing is everything, and James Brown came along at a time when his sound,
his energy, and his message found a receptive audience, and not just in the
black community.

There are several examples of him stepping forward and issuing a call for
calm in the aftermath of MLK's assassination, and for that, he deserves
credit. He performed for every President from Richard Nixon through George
W. Bush, and flew overseas to perform for America's fighting men and women
on numerous occasions.

On the down side, he certainly made more than his share of mistakes, some of
which have been mentioned in this thread. But to be fair, he served his
time and paid his debt to society for those mistakes that fell outside the
boundaries of the law. In hindsight, what more can be asked?

To say that his artistry was on the level of, say, a Ray Charles or a Nat
King Cole, is, I think, stretching things a bit. But it was also of an
entirely different genre, and some (mostly white) people are simply going to
dismiss it because they don't like that sort of thing. I dismiss those
opinions simply because of the closed-mindedness that drives such opinions.
Art is art, even if it's not the kind of art you might appreciate. You
might not have liked Lenny Bruce or Richard Pryor, and you might not have
thought they were exemplary human beings, but there's no question that they
forever changed stand-up comedy as an art form, and in so doing, spawned a
whole new generation of artists who helped to expand the art form and give
it new voices, many of which you probably enjoy today. In many ways, the
same can be said of James Brown, and for that, deserves some credit, too.

There's no getting around the fact that James Brown was "the hardest working
man in show business," and that millions loved him.

He will be missed. Maybe not by everyone, but by a lot of people.

Randy <--- Whoa! I feel good!




28 Dec 2006 15:28:48
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote
>
> His dance moves were impressive, especially since he was able to
> perform them in his later years.


Dance moves, yes. But the athleticism required to do them, especially at
such an advanced age, is what impressed me.

I hope I can still move like that when I'm in my 70s. :-)

But hell, I couldn't move like that when I was in my 20s. :-(

Randy




28 Dec 2006 12:49:13
dugjustdug
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



On Dec 28, 12:28 pm, ""R&B"" <noneofyourbusin...@all.com > wrote:
> But hell, I couldn't move like that when I was in my 20s. :-(
>
> Randy

Aw, come on, Randy. We've seen your swing videos. :-)

First time I saw his act on TV (I doubt I was 10 yet) I was pretty
unimpressed. Thought it was kind of silly actually. Didn't pay much
attention to him until he blasted out "Livin' in America" on Rocky IV.
Man, was that a cool bit of funk!

I wouldn't dare live my life like he lived his. But, then again, it
wasn't my call to make.



28 Dec 2006 15:56:47
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"Chris Bellomy" <puevf@tbbqfubj.arg.invalid > wrote
>
> He was also an amazing singer for his genre. I don't think Rob
> likes that genre at all, which is his right, but the influence
> that James Brown had on R&B (not Randy, the other R&B), soul
> and funk was immense. "Please Please Please" was just a tour
> de force, an amazing performance.


Having worked around the music business (sort of) for many years, I think
it's fair to say that James Brown helped to reshape the genre with his
sound. In fact, I don't think it's that much of a stretch to say that James
Brown helped to define a whole new genre of music, in much the same way The
Beatles helped define a new popular music genre that had previously been
defined by artists like Frank Sinatra.


> I say that understanding that he was a miserable human being
> and brought a lot of misery to the people closest to him. But
> he also brought people a lot of transcendent joy through his
> music. A world without James Brown would have been a duller
> thing.


It is sad, but true, that many of the most gifted artists are not what most
of us would call "model citizens." That's why I choose to view their
artistry (which is the gift they really gave us) separately from whatever
judgement I might render of them as human beings. Frankly, I think it's a
bit self-righteous to judge celebrities on such matters, anyway, especially
since the only things we really know of them as human beings comes from what
we read of them in the newspaper -- we don't really have any personal
encounters with them upon which to base such judgements.

Jerry Lewis is a good example of a celebrity who many would think of as a
fine human being, because of his extensive work doing those MD telethons.
But my best friend, who had occasion to meet Lewis and spend some time with
him, found him to be an utterly obnoxious asshole devoid of any apparent
redeeming qualities. It's easy enough for me to separate Lewis's art from
the persona he presented to my best friend. I've never liked either one.

I had a similar encounter once with Barry Manilow, who I almost threw out of
my office when he paid a visit to promote his record "Mandy" many years ago
when I was programming a radio station in Dallas. I couldn't stand the guy,
even though I liked some of his earliest songs. (His songs eventually made
me gag, even though I continue to respect him as an artist, even though his
stuff isn't my cup of tea.)

Interestingly, of all the artists I've met and got to know a little, the two
I found most personable, approachable, and easy to relate to are probably
ones that most of you would like the least -- Yanni and John Tesh -- two of
the nicest guys you'd ever meet.

One of my guilty pleasures (and I'm not especially proud to admit it) is
that I love to watch Stephen Seagal movies. Not that I think he's a great
actor. I guess I just like seeing him beat the shit out of the bad guys.
But ask anyone who lives or works in Hollywood and you'll quickly discover
that Stephen Seagal is one of the most despicable human beings working out
there. (Which is one of the reasons why most of his more recent films have
been direct-to-DVD releases, rather than theatrical releases distributed by
the major film companies. But he *is* still working, which is more than
what most actors in Hollywood can say.)

No one questioned whether Tom Cruise was a superb actor -- indeed, one of
the very best of his generation -- until he started sharing his personal
views about various subjects on talk shows and elsewhere. Then, suddenly,
many of the same people who enjoyed his earlier works thought his art was
worthless. That makes about as much sense as saying Vince Lombardi was no
longer a good coach after he left the Green Bay Packers and coached a couple
of mediocre seasons with the Washington Redskins.

So I guess the point I'm trying to make is that it's one thing to appreciate
a person's art. But it's best to appreciate the art on its own merit, and
to separate that from whatever you might think of the artist as a person.

There were only a few James Brown songs that I really liked. But I did like
them. That doesn't mean I would have particularly enjoyed having James
Brown over to my house for dinner. It's not that hard to separate your
appreciation for a person's art from what you think of the artist as a
person.

Randy




28 Dec 2006 21:31:02
Howard Brazee
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

I never thought that his music was that soulful. Soul is older than
Brown and he came up with something newer and different.


28 Dec 2006 13:47:14
dugjustdug
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

Good missive, Randy. And I appreciate your point of view in this
regard. For discussion purposes, I think the JB situation is a little
different than, say, Tom Cruise's views on Scientology or the backlash
towards Bill Clinton's escapades with a House intern, but, for slightly
connected reasons.

First off, Cruise is an actor, so, the vast majority of movie-goers
really could give a rip about his religious affiliation. He kind of
soured people when he kept sticking it out there for all to see.

People took differing views of Clinton's situation. Some asked to
judge his job performance rather than his personal life, while others
stated that a person in the position of President is not allowed to
separate the two.

James Brown fell somewhere in the middle in my opinion. If he was
spouting off about a certain religious belief or that his use of
magnets helped his hair stay fresh and managable, nobody would care a
bit. I think it's the *nature* of his transgressions that has created
a deviding line.

-dug

On Dec 28, 12:56 pm, ""R&B"" <noneofyourbusin...@all.com > wrote:
> "Chris Bellomy" <p...@tbbqfubj.arg.invalid> wrote
>
>
>
> > He was also an amazing singer for his genre. I don't think Rob
> > likes that genre at all, which is his right, but the influence
> > that James Brown had on R&B (not Randy, the other R&B), soul
> > and funk was immense. "Please Please Please" was just a tour
> > de force, an amazing performance.Having worked around the music business (sort of) for many years, I think
> it's fair to say that James Brown helped to reshape the genre with his
> sound. In fact, I don't think it's that much of a stretch to say that James
> Brown helped to define a whole new genre of music, in much the same way The
> Beatles helped define a new popular music genre that had previously been
> defined by artists like Frank Sinatra.
>
> > I say that understanding that he was a miserable human being
> > and brought a lot of misery to the people closest to him. But
> > he also brought people a lot of transcendent joy through his
> > music. A world without James Brown would have been a duller
> > thing.It is sad, but true, that many of the most gifted artists are not what most
> of us would call "model citizens." That's why I choose to view their
> artistry (which is the gift they really gave us) separately from whatever
> judgement I might render of them as human beings. Frankly, I think it's a
> bit self-righteous to judge celebrities on such matters, anyway, especially
> since the only things we really know of them as human beings comes from what
> we read of them in the newspaper -- we don't really have any personal
> encounters with them upon which to base such judgements.
>
> Jerry Lewis is a good example of a celebrity who many would think of as a
> fine human being, because of his extensive work doing those MD telethons.
> But my best friend, who had occasion to meet Lewis and spend some time with
> him, found him to be an utterly obnoxious asshole devoid of any apparent
> redeeming qualities. It's easy enough for me to separate Lewis's art from
> the persona he presented to my best friend. I've never liked either one.
>
> I had a similar encounter once with Barry Manilow, who I almost threw out of
> my office when he paid a visit to promote his record "Mandy" many years ago
> when I was programming a radio station in Dallas. I couldn't stand the guy,
> even though I liked some of his earliest songs. (His songs eventually made
> me gag, even though I continue to respect him as an artist, even though his
> stuff isn't my cup of tea.)
>
> Interestingly, of all the artists I've met and got to know a little, the two
> I found most personable, approachable, and easy to relate to are probably
> ones that most of you would like the least -- Yanni and John Tesh -- two of
> the nicest guys you'd ever meet.
>
> One of my guilty pleasures (and I'm not especially proud to admit it) is
> that I love to watch Stephen Seagal movies. Not that I think he's a great
> actor. I guess I just like seeing him beat the shit out of the bad guys.
> But ask anyone who lives or works in Hollywood and you'll quickly discover
> that Stephen Seagal is one of the most despicable human beings working out
> there. (Which is one of the reasons why most of his more recent films have
> been direct-to-DVD releases, rather than theatrical releases distributed by
> the major film companies. But he *is* still working, which is more than
> what most actors in Hollywood can say.)
>
> No one questioned whether Tom Cruise was a superb actor -- indeed, one of
> the very best of his generation -- until he started sharing his personal
> views about various subjects on talk shows and elsewhere. Then, suddenly,
> many of the same people who enjoyed his earlier works thought his art was
> worthless. That makes about as much sense as saying Vince Lombardi was no
> longer a good coach after he left the Green Bay Packers and coached a couple
> of mediocre seasons with the Washington Redskins.
>
> So I guess the point I'm trying to make is that it's one thing to appreciate
> a person's art. But it's best to appreciate the art on its own merit, and
> to separate that from whatever you might think of the artist as a person.
>
> There were only a few James Brown songs that I really liked. But I did like
> them. That doesn't mean I would have particularly enjoyed having James
> Brown over to my house for dinner. It's not that hard to separate your
> appreciation for a person's art from what you think of the artist as a
> person.
>
> Randy



28 Dec 2006 18:55:55
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"dugjustdug" <prestigerealty@yvn.com > wrote ...
>
> Good missive, Randy. And I appreciate your point of view in this
> regard. For discussion purposes, I think the JB situation is a little
> different than, say, Tom Cruise's views on Scientology or the backlash
> towards Bill Clinton's escapades with a House intern, but, for slightly
> connected reasons.
>
> First off, Cruise is an actor, so, the vast majority of movie-goers
> really could give a rip about his religious affiliation. He kind of
> soured people when he kept sticking it out there for all to see.


This takes the discussion into a somewhat different direction, but I feel
compelled to address it.

That Tom Cruise, or any other public figure for that matter, would choose to
use their celebrity for the purpose of advancing a particular point of view
is, I think, their business. One could argue, I believe, that if I person
felt strongly about a particular thing and DIDN'T use whatever advantage
they might have (including their own celebrity) to attract attention to
their point of view, they would be wasting an opportunity.

While I'm sure it's true that many, as you say, "don't give a rip" about
what Cruise or any other celebrity feels about certain things is true, the
fact is, some do. If that weren't true, then you wouldn't see so many
Fortune 500 companies use celebrity endorsers in their marketing. The
simple truth is, celebrities of all kinds are, to varying degrees, opinion
shapers. And while you may disagree with Cruise's views (or the views of
any other celebrity), some will take a second look at whatever it is they're
talking about simply because a celebrity (or someone they admire, for
whatever reason) drew attention to it. And I'm quite sure that's the whole
point behind their mentioning it in public.


> People took differing views of Clinton's situation. Some asked to
> judge his job performance rather than his personal life, while others
> stated that a person in the position of President is not allowed to
> separate the two.
>
> James Brown fell somewhere in the middle in my opinion. If he was
> spouting off about a certain religious belief or that his use of
> magnets helped his hair stay fresh and managable, nobody would care a
> bit. I think it's the *nature* of his transgressions that has created
> a deviding line.


If James Brown had endorsed magnets as the way he kept his hair fresh and
manageable, then you would have seen magnet sales plummet. :-)

If, on the other hand, he had said that magnets were the reason he was able
to continue to exude such youthful exuberance 'til his dying day, then I
suspect you'd see people lined up for blocks to buy them.

Randy


> -dug
>
> On Dec 28, 12:56 pm, ""R&B"" <noneofyourbusin...@all.com> wrote:
>> "Chris Bellomy" <p...@tbbqfubj.arg.invalid> wrote
>>
>>
>>
>> > He was also an amazing singer for his genre. I don't think Rob
>> > likes that genre at all, which is his right, but the influence
>> > that James Brown had on R&B (not Randy, the other R&B), soul
>> > and funk was immense. "Please Please Please" was just a tour
>> > de force, an amazing performance.Having worked around the music
>> > business (sort of) for many years, I think
>> it's fair to say that James Brown helped to reshape the genre with his
>> sound. In fact, I don't think it's that much of a stretch to say that
>> James
>> Brown helped to define a whole new genre of music, in much the same way
>> The
>> Beatles helped define a new popular music genre that had previously been
>> defined by artists like Frank Sinatra.
>>
>> > I say that understanding that he was a miserable human being
>> > and brought a lot of misery to the people closest to him. But
>> > he also brought people a lot of transcendent joy through his
>> > music. A world without James Brown would have been a duller
>> > thing.It is sad, but true, that many of the most gifted artists are not
>> > what most
>> of us would call "model citizens." That's why I choose to view their
>> artistry (which is the gift they really gave us) separately from whatever
>> judgement I might render of them as human beings. Frankly, I think it's
>> a
>> bit self-righteous to judge celebrities on such matters, anyway,
>> especially
>> since the only things we really know of them as human beings comes from
>> what
>> we read of them in the newspaper -- we don't really have any personal
>> encounters with them upon which to base such judgements.
>>
>> Jerry Lewis is a good example of a celebrity who many would think of as a
>> fine human being, because of his extensive work doing those MD telethons.
>> But my best friend, who had occasion to meet Lewis and spend some time
>> with
>> him, found him to be an utterly obnoxious asshole devoid of any apparent
>> redeeming qualities. It's easy enough for me to separate Lewis's art
>> from
>> the persona he presented to my best friend. I've never liked either one.
>>
>> I had a similar encounter once with Barry Manilow, who I almost threw out
>> of
>> my office when he paid a visit to promote his record "Mandy" many years
>> ago
>> when I was programming a radio station in Dallas. I couldn't stand the
>> guy,
>> even though I liked some of his earliest songs. (His songs eventually
>> made
>> me gag, even though I continue to respect him as an artist, even though
>> his
>> stuff isn't my cup of tea.)
>>
>> Interestingly, of all the artists I've met and got to know a little, the
>> two
>> I found most personable, approachable, and easy to relate to are probably
>> ones that most of you would like the least -- Yanni and John Tesh -- two
>> of
>> the nicest guys you'd ever meet.
>>
>> One of my guilty pleasures (and I'm not especially proud to admit it) is
>> that I love to watch Stephen Seagal movies. Not that I think he's a
>> great
>> actor. I guess I just like seeing him beat the shit out of the bad guys.
>> But ask anyone who lives or works in Hollywood and you'll quickly
>> discover
>> that Stephen Seagal is one of the most despicable human beings working
>> out
>> there. (Which is one of the reasons why most of his more recent films
>> have
>> been direct-to-DVD releases, rather than theatrical releases distributed
>> by
>> the major film companies. But he *is* still working, which is more than
>> what most actors in Hollywood can say.)
>>
>> No one questioned whether Tom Cruise was a superb actor -- indeed, one of
>> the very best of his generation -- until he started sharing his personal
>> views about various subjects on talk shows and elsewhere. Then,
>> suddenly,
>> many of the same people who enjoyed his earlier works thought his art was
>> worthless. That makes about as much sense as saying Vince Lombardi was
>> no
>> longer a good coach after he left the Green Bay Packers and coached a
>> couple
>> of mediocre seasons with the Washington Redskins.
>>
>> So I guess the point I'm trying to make is that it's one thing to
>> appreciate
>> a person's art. But it's best to appreciate the art on its own merit,
>> and
>> to separate that from whatever you might think of the artist as a person.
>>
>> There were only a few James Brown songs that I really liked. But I did
>> like
>> them. That doesn't mean I would have particularly enjoyed having James
>> Brown over to my house for dinner. It's not that hard to separate your
>> appreciation for a person's art from what you think of the artist as a
>> person.
>>
>> Randy
>




28 Dec 2006 19:01:47
MoiMoi
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

In article <lloydparsons-9FE6A6.20492827122006@individual.net >,
lloydparsons@mac.com says...
> In article <1167272440.031182.17870@73g2000cwn.googlegroups.com>,
> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote:
>
> > The_Professor wrote:
> > > Dene wrote:
> > > > Chris Bellomy wrote:
> > > > > Dene <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote:
> > > > >
> > > > > : Brown was a punk....period.
> > > > >
> > > > > Brown was a punk. But not "period." He was a lot of other things,
> > > > > too. The most talented often are also the most troubled -- the
> > > > > thing that drives the trouble also drives the talent. It's just
> > > > > a fact of the human condition.
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > > Fair enough. I'd feel better about the man had he acknowledged,
> > > > recanted his particular human condition. Instead, he's Mr. Celebrity
> > > > when he gets out of prison. A man who hits a woman is very low on my
> > > > totem pole. Only thing lower are those who hurt children.
> > > >
> > >
> > > I didn't see much talent there. I never liked his music, and always
> > > wondered what people saw in it. Interesting that this soulless form of
> > > music was called soul!
> >
> > His dance moves were impressive, especially since he was able to
> > perform them in his later years.
> >
> > -Greg
>
> They certainly were. I had the opportunity to see James Brown and the
> Famous Flames in Memphis in 1965. Me and my date were the only whites I
> saw there.
>
> But the music and the show was fantastic. He always put on a very
> complete show. His music was amazing and the acting that went with it
> was just superb.
>
> He was definitely a major contributor to the rock scene over lots of
> years. And when you consider his background and upbringing, it is
> unreal that he was able to overcome much of it to excel in his chosen
> profession.
>
> You may not miss him, but I certainly will.

Yup...saw him in Knoxville in late 60's or early 70's (I seem to be a
little fuzzy regarding those years for some reason)....
Fantastic show, a truly rockin experience...
Like many a super talent, JB was a study in contrasts, a "walking
contradiction".
But like you, my final take is that he gave me some joy.

MM


28 Dec 2006 16:13:13
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"R&B" wrote:

>
> I had a similar encounter once with Barry Manilow, who I almost threw out of
> my office when he paid a visit to promote his record "Mandy" many years ago
> when I was programming a radio station in Dallas. I couldn't stand the guy,
> even though I liked some of his earliest songs. (His songs eventually made
> me gag, even though I continue to respect him as an artist, even though his
> stuff isn't my cup of tea.)
>
> Interestingly, of all the artists I've met and got to know a little, the two
> I found most personable, approachable, and easy to relate to are probably
> ones that most of you would like the least -- Yanni and John Tesh -- two of
> the nicest guys you'd ever meet.

I'll echo Dug's sentiments as well....good post! I like your
perspective about appreciating the art aside from the source.

Curious about BM. What about him did you find offensive? Your answer
could save me some $$. My wife wants to see him. Me.......I'd rather
chew barbwire.

-Greg



28 Dec 2006 16:18:00
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"R&B" wrote:
> There's no getting around the fact that James Brown was "the hardest working
> man in show business," and that millions loved him.

But was he really? When I think of a hard workin performer, BB King
comes to mind. I don't recall the number but isn't he in concert about
300 times/yr?

My best friend has seen him countless times, whereas I never have, but
intend to someday. Given his age, I better get off my horse soon.

-Greg



28 Dec 2006 16:42:56
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


bill-o wrote:
> On 27-Dec-2006, Lloyd Parsons <lloydparsons@mac.com> wrote:
>
> > They certainly were. I had the opportunity to see James Brown and the
> > Famous Flames in Memphis in 1965. Me and my date were the only whites I
> > saw there.
>
> I saw him 20 some odd years later and he still did all the moves and, as you
> said, put on a complete show, one that didn't require a buzz to be
> appreiciated!
>
> --
> bill-o

Kinda interesting which artists or bands put on a good
performance....which ones don't. In my experience, the worst were
Gordon Lightfoot and Fleetwood Mac (sans Christie McVie)...absolutely
lifeless. FM really disappointed me, in that they are my favorite
band. I waited months to see them and ended up walking out midway.
Sound was awful!

Best concerts....don't laugh, but Amy Grant is right up there. So were
the Doobie Brothers (sans Michael McDonald, thank the Lord), Rush, and
Johnny Cash.

Best comedy performance. Williams and Ree. The Indian and the white
guy.

-Greg



28 Dec 2006 19:56:52
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote ...
>
> "R&B" wrote:
>
>>
>> I had a similar encounter once with Barry Manilow, who I almost threw out
>> of
>> my office when he paid a visit to promote his record "Mandy" many years
>> ago
>> when I was programming a radio station in Dallas. I couldn't stand the
>> guy,
>> even though I liked some of his earliest songs. (His songs eventually
>> made
>> me gag, even though I continue to respect him as an artist, even though
>> his
>> stuff isn't my cup of tea.)
>>
>> Interestingly, of all the artists I've met and got to know a little, the
>> two
>> I found most personable, approachable, and easy to relate to are probably
>> ones that most of you would like the least -- Yanni and John Tesh -- two
>> of
>> the nicest guys you'd ever meet.
>
> I'll echo Dug's sentiments as well....good post! I like your
> perspective about appreciating the art aside from the source.
>
> Curious about BM. What about him did you find offensive? Your answer
> could save me some $$. My wife wants to see him. Me.......I'd rather
> chew barbwire.


I just found him to be a fairly arrogant prick.

Come to think of it, by the time I met him, it was a bit past his "Mandy"
days (that was his first hit song). Maybe a couple years later, now that I
reflect a bit more on it. So he was an established "hitmaker" by the time I
met him, giving him ample opportunity to grow "full of himself." He was
making the radio station rounds, promoting a new release. Maybe I caught
him on a bad day; I have no way of knowing. But I found him to be extremely
self-centered, and rather rude. It could have been his New York-ish persona
(which rarely sits well with me, except when it's someone I know to be a
decent person).

Of course it's been 30 years or so since I met him, so it's not like I
remember any specifics, other than the fact that he's a heckuva lot taller
than I imagined him to be. I mainly remember that I was so put off by him
that a little voice inside my head was urging me to throw his ass out of my
office. But a louder voice inside my noggin persuaded me to be polite and
let him leave on his own terms. It's probably best that I did, since my
relationship with the Arista Records people was worth preserving, if only to
gain access to some of their other artists later. And I suppose, it was the
professional thing to do.

Manilow is an interesting case. He was a very successful (and filthy rich)
songwriter long before any of us ever heard his voice. He wrote gobs of
commercial jingles that we all know by heart even today, years after they've
stopped running on TV and radio -- "You deserve a break today at
McDonald's," "Like a good neighbor, State Farm is there," and some of the
better Dr. Pepper jingles like "I'm a Pepper, she's a Pepper, he's a Pepper,
wouldn't you like to be a Pepper, too?" were all his compositions, as were
many others.

Having worked with my share of ad agencies through the years, I know quite
well how working with them can lead a person to take on a somewhat cynical
view. So I make allowances for that in ol' Barry. But it's not like he
didn't reap huge rewards for putting up with it. He could have been more
gracious.

My best friend is an accomplished singer, songwriter and musician. And he
helped teach guitar to at least one popular musician who is wildly
successful today in country music (Kenny Sheppard). My friend can perform
circles around Manilow, and the songs he's written are every bit as "hook-y"
(catchy) and touching as Manilow's best work (which, in my view, was his
first song, Mandy -- after that, it all became much too formula and went
downhill). Songwriters don't just come up with this stuff in a vacuum. So
I know that somewhere deep down inside Manilow's soul, there has to be a
glimmer of humanity. Those lyrics and melodies had to come from somewhere
within him. So maybe he's not quite the asshole I make him out to be.

Truth is, to some people, even *I* have been considered a celebrity at
times. Believe me, I've never bought into any of that junk. But having
been in the public eye, I know quite well how people (the general public)
can perceive a certain persona, when in fact, their perception does not
reflect anything near the truth. So I make room for the possibility that my
one-time encounter with Mr. Manilow may not have given me an ideal
perspective to pass judgement. Still, it's the only perspective I have, and
as the old saying goes, the first impression is usually the one that sticks.

Is that fair of me? Maybe not. It's like when Arnold Palmer sticks around
and signs damn near every autograph-seeker's golf cap in sight. And then
the one kid who gets there late just as Palmer is walking away and doesn't
get his cap signed thinks Palmer is an asshole. Not that I'm comparing
Barry Manilow to Arnold Palmer, mind you. But I'm open to the possibility
that that my perception of Manilow is skewed somewhat by my limited
perspective.

Now Eddie Van Halen is another story. Even with my limited perspective of
having spent all of about 30 minutes with him, I can tell you without
hesitation that this is a truly phucked up individual frought with personal
problems I wouldn't wish upon anyone.

Randy




28 Dec 2006 19:59:14
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote ...
>
> "R&B" wrote:
>> There's no getting around the fact that James Brown was "the hardest
>> working
>> man in show business," and that millions loved him.
>
> But was he really? When I think of a hard workin performer, BB King
> comes to mind. I don't recall the number but isn't he in concert about
> 300 times/yr?
>
> My best friend has seen him countless times, whereas I never have, but
> intend to someday. Given his age, I better get off my horse soon.
>
> -Greg


I could tell you a story or two about my encounters with BB King. But not
here. Not in public. The statute of limitations may not have run out. :-)

Randy




29 Dec 2006 01:08:51
Robert Hamilton
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



Dene wrote:

> "R&B" wrote:
> > There's no getting around the fact that James Brown was "the hardest working
> > man in show business," and that millions loved him.
>
> But was he really? When I think of a hard workin performer, BB King
> comes to mind. I don't recall the number but isn't he in concert about
> 300 times/yr?
>
> My best friend has seen him countless times, whereas I never have, but
> intend to someday. Given his age, I better get off my horse soon.
>

Most working performers, at least in the blues, who have a good audience, have
been known to to 300 gigs per year. There are guys around here who seem to play
one casino or another every night.




29 Dec 2006 01:13:00
Robert Hamilton
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



"R&B" wrote:

> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote ...
> >
> > "R&B" wrote:
> >> There's no getting around the fact that James Brown was "the hardest
> >> working
> >> man in show business," and that millions loved him.
> >
> > But was he really? When I think of a hard workin performer, BB King
> > comes to mind. I don't recall the number but isn't he in concert about
> > 300 times/yr?
> >
> > My best friend has seen him countless times, whereas I never have, but
> > intend to someday. Given his age, I better get off my horse soon.
> >
> > -Greg
>
> I could tell you a story or two about my encounters with BB King. But not
> here. Not in public. The statute of limitations may not have run out. :-)
>
> Randy

If you get the Buddy Guy boxed set released this year, he tells a story about
how Muddy Waters showed up at Junior Well's motel room late one evening!



28 Dec 2006 17:12:20
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"R&B" wrote:

Good stuff about Manilow.....thanks.

> Now Eddie Van Halen is another story. Even with my limited perspective of
> having spent all of about 30 minutes with him, I can tell you without
> hesitation that this is a truly phucked up individual frought with personal
> problems I wouldn't wish upon anyone.

Interesting you say that. I was on a Van Halen web site which featured
a party he hosted. Video and pictures for all to see. Talk about a
garish scene. Rumor has it that his son, Wolfie, is being groomed as
the next band member, along with the return of infamous, glue-haired
David Lee Roth.

Too bad, in that VH was never better when they had a happy Sammy Hagar.

-Greg



28 Dec 2006 18:21:25
glfnaz
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote in message
news:1167354740.608991.175110@i12g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Too bad, in that VH was never better when they had a happy Sammy Hagar.
>
> -Greg
>

You should have heard them when Brad Becknal was the 2nd guitarist. This is
before Brad was replaced with Roth.




28 Dec 2006 20:42:40
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote
>
> Kinda interesting which artists or bands put on a good
> performance....which ones don't.


Best performers I ever saw live:

Genesis/Phil Collins. PC was just a bundle of energy. I've never seen
anyone run around stage, play various instruments, sing, and do whatever was
necessary to entertain. If memory serves, the concert I witnessed was just
a month or two before I saw him on TV perform live at one of those
mega-benefit concerts in Europe and then catch a flight to the US and
perform that same night in America (in Philadelphia, as I recall). He's
amazing.

Michael Jackson/Jackson 5. I got to see their first concert of the big tour
that opened at Arrowhead Stadium in Kansas City, and then at Texas Stadium
outside of Dallas in...what was it...1984? (This was right when MJ was
starting his run as the hottest entertainer on the planet with "Billy Jean"
and those other hits). Probably the single most entertaining concert I've
ever seen. And I got to see it twice.

Stevie Wonder. Had the privilege of seeing this tour twice, too. First at
their opening US date in Seattle, and then again later that year in Dallas,
1972. Wonder was merely the opening act. And he made the headliner pale by
comparison (no pun intended). The headline act was the Rolling Stones. And
they couldn't carry Stevie Wonder's sunglasses.

Luther Vandross. A captivating performer. No wonder his weight went up and
down like a yo-yo. The guy must have lost 10 pounds in sweat each time he
performed.

Yanni. The radio station I was with in Dallas helped hook him up with the
Dallas Symphony Orchestra for his very first live performance with a
symphony orchestra, something he'd wanted to do for years. Many don't know
it, but Yanni was a member of a heavy metal band in the 1970s (I forget
their name), and to see (and hear) how he adapted his compositions for a
symphony to play was, well, remarkable.

Bobby McFerrin. Speaking of the Dallas Symphony Orchestra, yes, the one-hit
wonder, Mr. "Don't Worry, Be Happy" performed with the DSO several years
ago. What many don't know about McFerrin is that he's a classically-trained
musician. After the intermission, he performed as "conductor" of the
orchestra as they played the William Tell Overture. But not with their
instruments. They pulled their instruments up to their mouths (or whatever
body part would play them), and then, just as he lifted his arms to ready
the musicians, they set their instruments down, and then, as he began moving
his arms to conduct them, the DSO musicians performed the overture with
their mouths, making sounds in much the same way we came to expect McFerrin
to perform his own songs. But to hear such a thing with so many voices at
once was, well, unforgettable.

Paul McCartney. Unfortunately, I never got to see The Beatles live. But
when I saw Paul McCartney and Wings in 1976, and when the whole band left
the stage for Paul to do his solo of "Yesterday," it nearly brought tears to
my eyes.

Alanis Morrisette. I was never a fan. But I went to a company Christmas
party for a radio company I was working with, and much to everyone's
surprise, they booked Alanis Morrisette to perform live at the end of the
evening, for a room full of about 100 people. About as intimate a gathering
as you'll ever see an artist like this. It was incredible.

Kenny G. I know what you're thinking. Say what you will about his music.
But when I saw him open for Whitney Houston, in the round at Reunion Arena
in Dallas, I was blown away. He circled the arena and walked up and down
almost every aisle while performing. It was amazing to see, even if you
weren't a fan of his music.

Worst live performers I've ever seen:

Paula Abdul. Well, it wasn't really a concert. It was what the industry
termed a "track date," where the artist would sing along with recorded
tracks of their songs (sans vocals) to a limited-size audience. Abdul had a
few top-10 hits around 1989-1990. She couldn't carry a tune in a basket.
But she wasn't bad to look at back then, and could dance her ass off. So I
guess the show wasn't a complete bust...if you had ear plugs.

Bobby Brown. The most untalented performer in the history of show business.
Can't sing. Can't dance.

But the all-time worst...

Steppenwolf. The most gawd-awful band in history. Great in the studio.
Can't do it live. And as any real musician will tell you, if you can't come
close to replicating your studio performance on stage, then you're no
musician at all. They weren't, and they couldn't.

Honorable mention...

Not sure if this goes under the category of "best" or "worst," but certainly
one of the more memorable musical performances I've witnessed in my life
came not on stage, but in a hotel room with a bunch of groupies and roadies
after a Yes concert in Dallas in 1972. A group of us from the radio station
were there to meet the band after the show, and while we were waiting for
the band members to show up, one of the DJs, a dear friend of mine named
Beau Weaver (now one of Hollywood's leading voiceover talents --
www.spokenword.com) demonstrated how he could "play his hands." A rather
peculiar phenomenon, Beau would squeeze the palms of his hands together,
squeezing out the air, making fart-like sounds, but he had the ability to do
it while more or less controlling the "pitch" of the "farts." For a roomful
of stoned-out hippies and hippettes, Beau proceeded to serenade us with his
rendition of "How Great Thou Art," which, uh, wasn't exactly the genre of
music this audience expected to hear. Needless to say, it was met with
mostly stone silence and a small smattering of applause from a stunned
audience of a dozen or so crazed people. I'll never forget it.

Randy




28 Dec 2006 20:43:50
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

Personally, I was more of a Van Halen fan during their David Lee Roth days.
I never could stand Sammy Hagar.

Randy


"Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote in message
news:1167354740.608991.175110@i12g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> "R&B" wrote:
>
> Good stuff about Manilow.....thanks.
>
>> Now Eddie Van Halen is another story. Even with my limited perspective
>> of
>> having spent all of about 30 minutes with him, I can tell you without
>> hesitation that this is a truly phucked up individual frought with
>> personal
>> problems I wouldn't wish upon anyone.
>
> Interesting you say that. I was on a Van Halen web site which featured
> a party he hosted. Video and pictures for all to see. Talk about a
> garish scene. Rumor has it that his son, Wolfie, is being groomed as
> the next band member, along with the return of infamous, glue-haired
> David Lee Roth.
>
> Too bad, in that VH was never better when they had a happy Sammy Hagar.
>
> -Greg
>




28 Dec 2006 17:44:39
Ben.
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



On Dec 28, 6:18 pm, "Dene" <gdst...@aol.com > wrote:
> "R&B" wrote:
> > There's no getting around the fact that James Brown was "the hardest working
> > man in show business," and that millions loved him.But was he really? When I think of a hard workin performer, BB King
> comes to mind.

If you want freaking overrated, just look up BB King on the dictionary
- he's the poster child.



28 Dec 2006 20:52:41
Head Shot
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"R&B" wrote:
> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote
>>
>> Kinda interesting which artists or bands put on a good
>> performance....which ones don't.
>
>
> Best performers I ever saw live:
<snip >

Best: Every Grateful Dead concert I ever saw (200 or so). What an amazing
experience touring those shows was.

Best Runner Up: Van Morrison. Also the first time I got past first base
with a girl.

Worst: Bad Company. No encore and they only did about 8 songs.

Worst Runner Up - Jorma Kaukonen when he played with some weird punk group
in 80/81 called Vital Parts. I left half way through, it was that bad.
How someone can go from Jefferson Airplane and Hot Tuna to a punk group of
18 year olds, I have no idea.






28 Dec 2006 20:10:18
Lloyd Parsons
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

In article <MPG.1ffe24f3406e4d4a9896df@news.individual.net >,
MoiMoi <moimoi@example.com > wrote:

> In article <lloydparsons-9FE6A6.20492827122006@individual.net>,
> lloydparsons@mac.com says...
> > In article <1167272440.031182.17870@73g2000cwn.googlegroups.com>,
> > "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote:
> >
> > > The_Professor wrote:
> > > > Dene wrote:
> > > > > Chris Bellomy wrote:
> > > > > > Dene <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote:
> > > > > >
> > > > > > : Brown was a punk....period.
> > > > > >
> > > > > > Brown was a punk. But not "period." He was a lot of other things,
> > > > > > too. The most talented often are also the most troubled -- the
> > > > > > thing that drives the trouble also drives the talent. It's just
> > > > > > a fact of the human condition.
> > > > > >
> > > > >
> > > > > Fair enough. I'd feel better about the man had he acknowledged,
> > > > > recanted his particular human condition. Instead, he's Mr. Celebrity
> > > > > when he gets out of prison. A man who hits a woman is very low on my
> > > > > totem pole. Only thing lower are those who hurt children.
> > > > >
> > > >
> > > > I didn't see much talent there. I never liked his music, and always
> > > > wondered what people saw in it. Interesting that this soulless form of
> > > > music was called soul!
> > >
> > > His dance moves were impressive, especially since he was able to
> > > perform them in his later years.
> > >
> > > -Greg
> >
> > They certainly were. I had the opportunity to see James Brown and the
> > Famous Flames in Memphis in 1965. Me and my date were the only whites I
> > saw there.
> >
> > But the music and the show was fantastic. He always put on a very
> > complete show. His music was amazing and the acting that went with it
> > was just superb.
> >
> > He was definitely a major contributor to the rock scene over lots of
> > years. And when you consider his background and upbringing, it is
> > unreal that he was able to overcome much of it to excel in his chosen
> > profession.
> >
> > You may not miss him, but I certainly will.
>
> Yup...saw him in Knoxville in late 60's or early 70's (I seem to be a
> little fuzzy regarding those years for some reason)....
> Fantastic show, a truly rockin experience...
> Like many a super talent, JB was a study in contrasts, a "walking
> contradiction".
> But like you, my final take is that he gave me some joy.
>
> MM

Because of that show, I got introduced to the Memphis jazz scene. The
gal I took to the JB show was scared to death because of all the blacks
there. She wanted to go and kept bitching. Finally this very nice
couple next to us told me to 'give the b$$ch the car' and they would see
I got to the base (I was in the Navy).

Well, we didn't quite get to the base that night. It was a Friday and
we went to some after hours jazz clubs that night and Saturday. A hell
of a weekend, or at least the parts I remember! ;-) Met a real
sweetheart of a gal, but we couldn't date openly in those day, not in
Memphis!


28 Dec 2006 19:16:44
glfnaz
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"Head Shot" <HeadShot@ThePinkMist.com > wrote in message
news:ux_kh.14110$AY1.1136@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
> "R&B" wrote:
>> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote
>>>
>>> Kinda interesting which artists or bands put on a good
>>> performance....which ones don't.
>>
>>
>> Best performers I ever saw live:
> <snip>
>
> Best: Every Grateful Dead concert I ever saw (200 or so). What an
> amazing experience touring those shows was.

Incredible live.
First one I ever saw was Long Beach Civic, 1971.
I only saw them about 10 times, but they were incredible.
Do you have a copy of the 1969 Filmore East concert where it was all
acustic?




28 Dec 2006 21:31:15
MoiMoi
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

In article <45947a89$0$10309$815e3792@news.qwest.net >,
glfnaz@qwesttrash.com says...
>
> "Head Shot" <HeadShot@ThePinkMist.com> wrote in message
> news:ux_kh.14110$AY1.1136@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
> > "R&B" wrote:
> >> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote
> >>>
> >>> Kinda interesting which artists or bands put on a good
> >>> performance....which ones don't.
> >>
> >>
> >> Best performers I ever saw live:
> > <snip>
> >
> > Best: Every Grateful Dead concert I ever saw (200 or so). What an
> > amazing experience touring those shows was.
>
> Incredible live.
> First one I ever saw was Long Beach Civic, 1971.
> I only saw them about 10 times, but they were incredible.
> Do you have a copy of the 1969 Filmore East concert where it was all
> acustic?

No, but I heard them for free in S.F.'s Golden Gate Park in '68.
Back when the Hell's Angels did crowd control, everything cool, pre-
Altamont.
Doze were da daze.

MM


28 Dec 2006 18:33:24
Ben.
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



On Dec 28, 8:16 pm, "glfnaz" <glf...@qwesttrash.com > wrote:
> "Head Shot" <HeadS...@ThePinkMist.com> wrote in messagenews:ux_kh.14110$AY1.1136@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
>
> > "R&B" wrote:
> >> "Dene" <gdst...@aol.com> wrote
>
> >>> Kinda interesting which artists or bands put on a good
> >>> performance....which ones don't.
>
> >> Best performers I ever saw live:
> > <snip>
>
> > Best: Every Grateful Dead concert I ever saw (200 or so). What an
> > amazing experience touring those shows was.Incredible live.
> First one I ever saw was Long Beach Civic, 1971.
> I only saw them about 10 times, but they were incredible.
> Do you have a copy of the 1969 Filmore East concert where it was all
> acustic?

The Fillmore East acoustic sets were typically the precedent to the
evening's electric sets. I do believe they were from 1970, as well,
not 1969. All Grateful Dead shows, direct soundboard feeds excluded,
are available for free download in .shn, .flac, and MP3 formats at
http://www.archive.org/details/GratefulDead- my gut feeling tells me
that you won't find much from that era from the audience tapers. But
you can stream the soundboards...have fun.

The Grateful Dead were hit or miss. No grey areas there. I saw them
roughly 50 times - they produced both the most incredible concert
experience and also the weakest concert experiences I ever had. And I
was in the vast, vast minority who was never under the influence of
hallucinagenics at one of their shows. I did manage to see the final
Greek Theatre concert they ever played in Berkeley - 8/19/89 - very
tasty second set.



28 Dec 2006 21:43:56
Head Shot
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

glfnaz wrote:
> "Head Shot" <HeadShot@ThePinkMist.com> wrote in message
>> "R&B" wrote:
>>> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote
>>>>
>>>> Kinda interesting which artists or bands put on a good
>>>> performance....which ones don't.
>>>
>>>
>>> Best performers I ever saw live:
>> <snip>
>>
>> Best: Every Grateful Dead concert I ever saw (200 or so). What an
>> amazing experience touring those shows was.
>
> Incredible live.
> First one I ever saw was Long Beach Civic, 1971.
> I only saw them about 10 times, but they were incredible.
> Do you have a copy of the 1969 Filmore East concert where it was all
> acustic?

Funny you should ask that. I have about 350 live shows. I used to go to
the shows in the taper section. I have lots of Filmore shows. I used to
have them listed in a database; but I lost the database during a notebook
upgrade and now I have to re-load the data. I actually need to try and
find that software again; and then I will re-load it and post the show list.
I had tons from the 60's - perhaps 50 or so tapes.




29 Dec 2006 03:16:22
Robert Hamilton
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



"R&B" wrote:

snippitall....

Now I see why we get along so well. I wouldn't cross the street to see any of
those acts.

Best.

One and one only: Stevie Ray Vaughan. A 3 piece combo blows you away, and in the
day when you had absurd pyrotechnics, gaudy make up, various theatrical themes
and everything else some guy playing an old beat up Strat with his eyes closed
has 10,000X the impact of any of that garbage. No one really knew what to expect
at the time, sort of a novelty kind of thing, and he was amazing beyond what
anyone could have epxected! I had certainly never seen anyone play like that.
Totally changed my concept of what makes good blues/rock music.

Worst...there are so many....

Jethro Tull. Ian Anderson really did come across as playing his lips! I really
liked that band too, even after. Good records, even a good live album, but not
that night!

James Cotton. Really awful. He hardly played at all. They said he was ill or
something...in that case he should have cancelled.

Roy Buchannan. He was so blasted I'm amazed he could actually play the guitar.
He missed more notes than he hit. When he was good, he was really good, when he
was bad, he was really bad I suppose!

Peter Frampton. Felt like a fool going to a Peter Frampton concert. He was OK I
suppose, but it was Peter Frampton...yuk!


Band I wish I could have seen: Ten Years After.





29 Dec 2006 03:20:12
Robert Hamilton
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



"Ben." wrote:

> On Dec 28, 6:18 pm, "Dene" <gdst...@aol.com> wrote:
> > "R&B" wrote:
> > > There's no getting around the fact that James Brown was "the hardest working
> > > man in show business," and that millions loved him.But was he really? When I think of a hard workin performer, BB King
> > comes to mind.
>
> If you want freaking overrated, just look up BB King on the dictionary
> - he's the poster child.

My dictionary has a photo of The Grateful Dead there.




28 Dec 2006 19:22:08
Ben.
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



On Dec 28, 9:20 pm, Robert Hamilton <D...@att.net > wrote:
> "Ben." wrote:
> > On Dec 28, 6:18 pm, "Dene" <gdst...@aol.com> wrote:
> > > "R&B" wrote:
> > > > There's no getting around the fact that James Brown was "the hardest working
> > > > man in show business," and that millions loved him.But was he really? When I think of a hard workin performer, BB King
> > > comes to mind.
>
> > If you want freaking overrated, just look up BB King on the dictionary
> > - he's the poster child.My dictionary has a photo of The Grateful Dead there.

Cool. I was looking up the dictionary definition of "Usenet guy
reaching out for someone, anyone to validate his useless opinions on
what is and what isn't good music". Guess who I found, Prof?



28 Dec 2006 20:23:33
glfnaz
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"Head Shot" <HeadShot@ThePinkMist.com > wrote in message
news:wh%kh.14122$AY1.10480@bignews5.bellsouth.net...
> glfnaz wrote:
>> "Head Shot" <HeadShot@ThePinkMist.com> wrote in message
>>> "R&B" wrote:
>>>> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote
>>>>>
>>>>> Kinda interesting which artists or bands put on a good
>>>>> performance....which ones don't.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>> Best performers I ever saw live:
>>> <snip>
>>>
>>> Best: Every Grateful Dead concert I ever saw (200 or so). What an
>>> amazing experience touring those shows was.
>>
>> Incredible live.
>> First one I ever saw was Long Beach Civic, 1971.
>> I only saw them about 10 times, but they were incredible.
>> Do you have a copy of the 1969 Filmore East concert where it was all
>> acustic?
>
> Funny you should ask that. I have about 350 live shows. I used to go to
> the shows in the taper section. I have lots of Filmore shows. I used to
> have them listed in a database; but I lost the database during a notebook
> upgrade and now I have to re-load the data. I actually need to try and
> find that software again; and then I will re-load it and post the show
> list. I had tons from the 60's - perhaps 50 or so tapes.
>

The one I'm looking for is the one they played a set with The New Riders.




29 Dec 2006 03:25:29
Robert Hamilton
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



"Ben." wrote:

> On Dec 28, 9:20 pm, Robert Hamilton <D...@att.net> wrote:
> > "Ben." wrote:
> > > On Dec 28, 6:18 pm, "Dene" <gdst...@aol.com> wrote:
> > > > "R&B" wrote:
> > > > > There's no getting around the fact that James Brown was "the hardest working
> > > > > man in show business," and that millions loved him.But was he really? When I think of a hard workin performer, BB King
> > > > comes to mind.
> >
> > > If you want freaking overrated, just look up BB King on the dictionary
> > > - he's the poster child.

> > My dictionary has a photo of The Grateful Dead there.
>
> Cool. I was looking up the dictionary definition of "Usenet guy
> reaching out for someone, anyone to validate his useless opinions on
> what is and what isn't good music". Guess who I found, Prof?

What everyone else finds when they look in a mirror.




28 Dec 2006 19:32:32
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"R&B" wrote:
> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote ...
> >
> > "R&B" wrote:
> >> There's no getting around the fact that James Brown was "the hardest
> >> working
> >> man in show business," and that millions loved him.
> >
> > But was he really? When I think of a hard workin performer, BB King
> > comes to mind. I don't recall the number but isn't he in concert about
> > 300 times/yr?
> >
> > My best friend has seen him countless times, whereas I never have, but
> > intend to someday. Given his age, I better get off my horse soon.
> >
> > -Greg
>
>
> I could tell you a story or two about my encounters with BB King. But not
> here. Not in public. The statute of limitations may not have run out. :-)
>
> Randy

Lemme guess. He cheats at golf. : >

-Greg



28 Dec 2006 22:35:59
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"Robert Hamilton" <DBID@att.net > wrote in message
news:45948710.1014942D@att.net...
>
>
> "Ben." wrote:
>
>> On Dec 28, 6:18 pm, "Dene" <gdst...@aol.com> wrote:
>> > "R&B" wrote:
>> > > There's no getting around the fact that James Brown was "the hardest
>> > > working
>> > > man in show business," and that millions loved him.But was he really?
>> > > When I think of a hard workin performer, BB King
>> > comes to mind.
>>
>> If you want freaking overrated, just look up BB King on the dictionary
>> - he's the poster child.
>
> My dictionary has a photo of The Grateful Dead there.

See, Rob, we don't disagree on everything.

I never could stand the Grateful Dead. I'm told that to fully appreciate
them, one would have to see them live. But you'd have to drag me kicking
and screaming to see them perform. I just didn't like their music -- live,
dead, or otherwise.

Similarly, Bruce Springsteen is an act that everyone used to say you'd have
to see live to fully appreciate his rare talent. Well, I saw him live, and
I didn't like him live any more than I liked him recorded. Springsteen did
one song I liked -- Born to Run. The rest was junk, as far as I was
concerned. It's been said that he spoke to a generation. Well, I'm pretty
darn close to the age of the generation he is reputed to have spoken to (I
was in my early to mid 20s when he first burst on to the national scene),
but I just flat didn't get it.

Two artists I never got to see perform live that I would have liked to were
Steely Dan and Cat Stevens.

One other really good concert I went to that I failed to mention before was
Anita Baker. She was exceptional. But maybe it's because there were no
frills -- just music -- and the fact that her songs have always moved me.

Randy




28 Dec 2006 19:39:10
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"R&B" wrote:
> Personally, I was more of a Van Halen fan during their David Lee Roth days.
> I never could stand Sammy Hagar.
>
> Randy

I like SH's range and the fact that he could play guitar, freeing Eddie
to do some pretty good stuff on the keyboards. I also like the songs
they wrote better.

-Greg



28 Dec 2006 22:37:24
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote in message
news:1167363152.149439.49440@n51g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
>
> "R&B" wrote:
>> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote ...
>> >
>> > "R&B" wrote:
>> >> There's no getting around the fact that James Brown was "the hardest
>> >> working
>> >> man in show business," and that millions loved him.
>> >
>> > But was he really? When I think of a hard workin performer, BB King
>> > comes to mind. I don't recall the number but isn't he in concert about
>> > 300 times/yr?
>> >
>> > My best friend has seen him countless times, whereas I never have, but
>> > intend to someday. Given his age, I better get off my horse soon.
>> >
>> > -Greg
>>
>>
>> I could tell you a story or two about my encounters with BB King. But
>> not
>> here. Not in public. The statute of limitations may not have run out.
>> :-)
>>
>> Randy
>
> Lemme guess. He cheats at golf. :>
>
> -Greg


No. But golf is played on grass, so I guess you could say you're close.

Randy




28 Dec 2006 19:41:25
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


I'm irritated. Never saw any of those bands or performers you listed.
The price one pays growing up in Klamath Falls, Oregon...aka "the
armpit of Oregon."

-Greg



28 Dec 2006 22:53:43
Lee Gordon
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

<<I never could stand the Grateful Dead. I'm told that to fully appreciate
them, one would have to see them live. But you'd have to drag me kicking
and screaming to see them perform. I just didn't like their music -- live,
dead, or otherwise. >>

Q: What were you most likely to hear someone say at a Greatful Dead concert
when they ran out of drugs?

A: "Man, this music sucks."

Lee
--
To e-mail, replace "bucketofspam" with "dleegordon"

_________________________________
Lee Gordon
http://www.leegordonproductions.com




28 Dec 2006 20:58:27
glfnaz
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


""R&B"" <noneofyourbusiness@all.com > wrote in message
news:wsCdnbKaCOqNEAnYnZ2dnUVZ_qGjnZ2d@giganews.com...
> Two artists I never got to see perform live that I would have liked to
> were Steely Dan and Cat Stevens.
> Randy
>
Steely Dan couldn't perform live.
They tried and quit.
They were that bad.




28 Dec 2006 23:13:37
Bert Robbins
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

Head Shot wrote:
> glfnaz wrote:
>> "Head Shot" <HeadShot@ThePinkMist.com> wrote in message
>>> "R&B" wrote:
>>>> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote
>>>>> Kinda interesting which artists or bands put on a good
>>>>> performance....which ones don't.
>>>>
>>>> Best performers I ever saw live:
>>> <snip>
>>>
>>> Best: Every Grateful Dead concert I ever saw (200 or so). What an
>>> amazing experience touring those shows was.
>> Incredible live.
>> First one I ever saw was Long Beach Civic, 1971.
>> I only saw them about 10 times, but they were incredible.
>> Do you have a copy of the 1969 Filmore East concert where it was all
>> acustic?
>
> Funny you should ask that. I have about 350 live shows. I used to go to
> the shows in the taper section. I have lots of Filmore shows. I used to
> have them listed in a database; but I lost the database during a notebook
> upgrade and now I have to re-load the data. I actually need to try and
> find that software again; and then I will re-load it and post the show list.
> I had tons from the 60's - perhaps 50 or so tapes.

Wow, that's a major accomplishment, 350 live Dead shows.




29 Dec 2006 04:13:11
Chris Bellomy
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

""R&B"" <noneofyourbusiness@all.com > wrote:

: Two artists I never got to see perform live that I would have liked to were
: Steely Dan and Cat Stevens.

OK, we've heard from the boomers, time for the opinion of somebody
slightly younger...

Best shows:

1. Joe Jackson at the Bronco Bowl, 1985. The show started late as
Jackson wasn't happy with the tuning of the house piano. Turns out
that he was picky for a reason... that band was TIGHT. The show
touched on everything from the new wave _Look Sharp!_ era through
the jump swing material on _Jumpin' Jive_ to the more straight-
forward pop of _Night and Day_ and _Body and Soul_, and they
nailed all of it with energy and flair.

2. Joe Jackson Band at Deep Ellum Live, 2004. They're all about
50 by this point, on a reunion tour, playing songs that are 25
years old, plus they're getting over the flu. All they did was
rock harder than any 20somethings I have ever seen.

3. Pleasure Barons at the Caravan of Dreams, circa 1993. No cover.
The band consists of Mojo Nixon, Country Dick Montana and Dave Alvin,
plus rhythm section and backing singers. Country Dick didn't throw
Mojo off the stage (known to happen at PB shows) but everything
else happened. Completely ribald, all balls and no pretense, insane
fun.

Worst shows:

1. Jon Spencer Blues Explosion. Guys, shouting "BLUES EXPLOSION!"
and then thrashing pointlessly isn't raising the energy level. It's
just raising the wankery level.

2. Bob Dylan with Tom Petty and the Heartbreakers. To be clear,
the middle set, sans Dylan, was pretty great. Petty was charismatic
and comfortable with the crowd. Dylan just seemed like he wanted
to get through with it as quickly as possible and get the hell out.
Come to think of it, so did I.

3. [tie] Every shoegazer emo-rock band I've ever seen that never
looked up, never spoke, never really moved, never engaged the
audience in any real way, just stared at the floor trying to
look angst-ridden. You want angst-ridden, fellas? Look up and
you'll see angst-ridden.

--
Chris Bellomy
C-List Charter Member
http://clist.org/


29 Dec 2006 04:19:33
Chris Bellomy
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

glfnaz <glfnaz@qwesttrash.com > wrote:
:
: ""R&B"" <noneofyourbusiness@all.com > wrote in message
: news:wsCdnbKaCOqNEAnYnZ2dnUVZ_qGjnZ2d@giganews.com...
: > Two artists I never got to see perform live that I would have liked to
: > were Steely Dan and Cat Stevens.
: > Randy
: >
: Steely Dan couldn't perform live.
: They tried and quit.
: They were that bad.

They do now, though. Getting clean helps.

--
Chris Bellomy
C-List Charter Member
http://clist.org/


29 Dec 2006 05:21:41
bill-o
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


On 28-Dec-2006, ""R&B"" <noneofyourbusiness@all.com > wrote:

> >> If you want freaking overrated, just look up BB King on the dictionary
> >> - he's the poster child.
> >
> > My dictionary has a photo of The Grateful Dead there.
>
> See, Rob, we don't disagree on everything.

Add me to the underwhelmed by the Dead list.

--
bill-o

A "gimme" can best be defined as an agreement between
two golfers neither of whom can putt very well.


28 Dec 2006 21:32:26
annika1980
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"R&B" wrote:
> Stevie Wonder. Had the privilege of seeing this tour twice, too.

Well that's two more times than Stevie.



> But the all-time worst...
>
> Steppenwolf. The most gawd-awful band in history. Great in the studio.
> Can't do it live. And as any real musician will tell you, if you can't come
> close to replicating your studio performance on stage, then you're no
> musician at all. They weren't, and they couldn't.

I saw them once in like 1970 and twice more about 10 years apart. I
thought they were great each time, although I was a little
uncomfortable at the Agora Ballroom in ATL standing amidst all those
biker dudes. I think one of them felt me up. And I kinda liked it!

-Annika ---- > Born to Be Wild



28 Dec 2006 21:45:29
annika1980
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


OK, since this thread has now reached the stage where everyone posts
their favorite groups that they've seen, here is a question.....

Have you ever seen an opening act that was far better than the main act
that they were opening for?

Back in the late 60's my mom dragged me to a Bread concert (what is
worse ... going to see Bread or going with your mom?). Focus was the
opening act and they ruled it with their hit song "Hocus Pocus."

Another time I went to see The Fabulous Poodles open for Tom Petty. I
was no TP fan, I was there just to see the Fab Poos, but even the
diehard Tom Petty fans thought his perfomance was anti-climactic.

I saw the Bus Boys open for somebody at the Agora Ballroom in ATL and
they did so well they were back as the main act a few weeks later.



28 Dec 2006 21:46:59
annika1980
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


Head Shot wrote:
> Best: Every Grateful Dead concert I ever saw (200 or so).

Was this a court-ordered punishment?



29 Dec 2006 05:51:20
Robert Hamilton
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



"R&B" wrote:

> "Robert Hamilton" <DBID@att.net> wrote in message
> news:45948710.1014942D@att.net...
> >
> >
> > "Ben." wrote:
> >
> >> On Dec 28, 6:18 pm, "Dene" <gdst...@aol.com> wrote:
> >> > "R&B" wrote:
> >> > > There's no getting around the fact that James Brown was "the hardest
> >> > > working
> >> > > man in show business," and that millions loved him.But was he really?
> >> > > When I think of a hard workin performer, BB King
> >> > comes to mind.
> >>
> >> If you want freaking overrated, just look up BB King on the dictionary
> >> - he's the poster child.
> >
> > My dictionary has a photo of The Grateful Dead there.
>
> See, Rob, we don't disagree on everything.
>
> I never could stand the Grateful Dead. I'm told that to fully appreciate
> them, one would have to see them live. But you'd have to drag me kicking
> and screaming to see them perform. I just didn't like their music -- live,
> dead, or otherwise.
>
> Similarly, Bruce Springsteen is an act that everyone used to say you'd have
> to see live to fully appreciate his rare talent. Well, I saw him live, and
> I didn't like him live any more than I liked him recorded. Springsteen did
> one song I liked -- Born to Run. The rest was junk, as far as I was
> concerned. It's been said that he spoke to a generation. Well, I'm pretty
> darn close to the age of the generation he is reputed to have spoken to (I
> was in my early to mid 20s when he first burst on to the national scene),
> but I just flat didn't get it.
>
> Two artists I never got to see perform live that I would have liked to were
> Steely Dan and Cat Stevens.
>
> One other really good concert I went to that I failed to mention before was
> Anita Baker. She was exceptional. But maybe it's because there were no
> frills -- just music -- and the fact that her songs have always moved me.
>
> Randy

I'm shocked! I agree with everything you say here!! Springsteen was way to
negative for me. Anita Baker was definately exceptional.




29 Dec 2006 02:13:49
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote ...
>
> I'm irritated. Never saw any of those bands or performers you listed.
> The price one pays growing up in Klamath Falls, Oregon...aka "the
> armpit of Oregon."



One of the advantages of spending 25 years in top-40 radio. I saw almost
everybody there was to see.

Best of all, I saw most of them free. And more often than not, had
backstage passes, too.

It sure made getting laid a lot easier.

"Hey, sweetie, wanna go to the concert with me; we can go backstage and meet
the band..."

Ah, the good ol' days.

Later, when I worked in News/Talk radio, the vibe was much different. "Hey,
sweetie, wanna go with me to the garden show where I can introduce you to
our station's lawn and garden expert, and we can ask him about perennials
and fertilizer?"

Didn't have quite the same effect. :-(

Randy




28 Dec 2006 23:43:53
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"R&B" wrote:
> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote ...
> >
> > I'm irritated. Never saw any of those bands or performers you listed.
> > The price one pays growing up in Klamath Falls, Oregon...aka "the
> > armpit of Oregon."
>
>
>
> One of the advantages of spending 25 years in top-40 radio. I saw almost
> everybody there was to see.
>
> Best of all, I saw most of them free. And more often than not, had
> backstage passes, too.
>
> It sure made getting laid a lot easier.
>
> "Hey, sweetie, wanna go to the concert with me; we can go backstage and meet
> the band..."
>
> Ah, the good ol' days.
>
> Later, when I worked in News/Talk radio, the vibe was much different. "Hey,
> sweetie, wanna go with me to the garden show where I can introduce you to
> our station's lawn and garden expert, and we can ask him about perennials
> and fertilizer?"
>
> Didn't have quite the same effect. :-(
>
> Randy

Dang funny!

Did you ever see Lynard Skynard b4 the crash? I'd love to see the live
version of Sweet Home Alabama.

-Greg



29 Dec 2006 08:29:59
S McFarlane
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

""R&B"" <noneofyourbusiness@all.com > wrote in message
>
> Best performers I ever saw live:
>

Best live moment was Pink Floyd 93'ish. Absolutely pouring down summer rain
in Texas Stadium, a giant disco ball on the stadium floor throwing crazy
reflections on the stadium walls through the driving rain to an extended
version of 'Breathe' almost perfectly rendered. Didn't need any of the
concert enhancements of my youth that night. Absolutely stunning
experience, even if some of it was provided by Mother Nature. Overall the
concert was very good - definitely not their best given the lineup - but
that particular moment will always stand out in my mind.

Another great one was the Dixie Dregs in 2004. Very small venue with all
early-era Dregs, with the exception of the violin. Jerry Goodman of
Mahavishnu fame stood in for that position. Nice rendition of 'The Dance of
Maya'. Crazy to have that much musical talent playing in such a small room.

AC/DC. Not the biggest fan of their music, but what a spectacle!

Best live performance I never witnessed: Frank Zappa, especially his
mid-70's bands. If I could only see one band from the past, that would be
the one.

Scott




29 Dec 2006 05:24:20
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


annika1980 wrote:
> OK, since this thread has now reached the stage where everyone posts
> their favorite groups that they've seen, here is a question.....
>
> Have you ever seen an opening act that was far better than the main act
> that they were opening for?
>
> Back in the late 60's my mom dragged me to a Bread concert (what is
> worse ... going to see Bread or going with your mom?). Focus was the
> opening act and they ruled it with their hit song "Hocus Pocus."
>
> Another time I went to see The Fabulous Poodles open for Tom Petty. I
> was no TP fan, I was there just to see the Fab Poos, but even the
> diehard Tom Petty fans thought his perfomance was anti-climactic.
>
> I saw the Bus Boys open for somebody at the Agora Ballroom in ATL and
> they did so well they were back as the main act a few weeks later.


Back in the early '80's, I had an amazing time going to a concert of
Pylon. It was one helluva concert! Will never forget that night!
I can't remember what year it was, (who cares anyway!), but I was
totally blown-away by attending a concert of Sabbath! My ears are
still ringing!
Helen



29 Dec 2006 06:41:18
glfnaz
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"Lee Gordon" <bucketofspam@comcast.net > wrote in message
news:f9qdnZLGbdHVDAnYnZ2dnUVZ_qSrnZ2d@comcast.com...
> Q: What were you most likely to hear someone say at a Greatful Dead
> concert when they ran out of drugs?
>

" Hey dude, got any spare change for a brother in need"?
I heard that one a lot.




29 Dec 2006 06:51:02
glfnaz
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com > wrote in message
news:1167371128.984931.104040@n51g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
>
> OK, since this thread has now reached the stage where everyone posts
> their favorite groups that they've seen, here is a question.....
>
> Have you ever seen an opening act that was far better than the main act
> that they were opening for?

Loggins and Messina was better than 3 Dog Night.
Neither was on my hit list to see, but the girl I was dating really wanted
to go.




29 Dec 2006 08:52:22
Bert Robbins
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

annika1980 wrote:
> OK, since this thread has now reached the stage where everyone posts
> their favorite groups that they've seen, here is a question.....
>
> Have you ever seen an opening act that was far better than the main act
> that they were opening for?
>
> Back in the late 60's my mom dragged me to a Bread concert (what is
> worse ... going to see Bread or going with your mom?). Focus was the
> opening act and they ruled it with their hit song "Hocus Pocus."
>
> Another time I went to see The Fabulous Poodles open for Tom Petty. I
> was no TP fan, I was there just to see the Fab Poos, but even the
> diehard Tom Petty fans thought his perfomance was anti-climactic.
>
> I saw the Bus Boys open for somebody at the Agora Ballroom in ATL and
> they did so well they were back as the main act a few weeks later.
>

I saw Aerosmith open for the Who back in the early '80's at the Capital
Center in Wash. DC. Aerosmith was great the Who sucked. The guy running
the sound board for the Who should have been strung up right then and there.

I saw George Thourgood and the Destroyers open for the Rolling Stones at
their first last concert in the US back in '80 or '81. Both were great.



29 Dec 2006 08:53:50
Bert Robbins
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"R&B" wrote:
> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote ...
>> I'm irritated. Never saw any of those bands or performers you listed.
>> The price one pays growing up in Klamath Falls, Oregon...aka "the
>> armpit of Oregon."
>
>
>
> One of the advantages of spending 25 years in top-40 radio. I saw almost
> everybody there was to see.
>
> Best of all, I saw most of them free. And more often than not, had
> backstage passes, too.
>
> It sure made getting laid a lot easier.
>
> "Hey, sweetie, wanna go to the concert with me; we can go backstage and meet
> the band..."
>
> Ah, the good ol' days.
>
> Later, when I worked in News/Talk radio, the vibe was much different. "Hey,
> sweetie, wanna go with me to the garden show where I can introduce you to
> our station's lawn and garden expert, and we can ask him about perennials
> and fertilizer?"
>
> Didn't have quite the same effect. :-(

You should have asked their mothers to go :)


29 Dec 2006 08:41:17
dugjustdug
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

On Dec 28, 7:58 pm, "glfnaz" <glf...@qwesttrash.com > wrote:
> ""R&B"" <noneofyourbusin...@all.com> wrote in messagenews:wsCdnbKaCOqNEAnYnZ2dnUVZ_qGjnZ2d@giganews.com...> Two artists I never got to see perform live that I would have liked to
> > were Steely Dan and Cat Stevens.
> > RandySteely Dan couldn't perform live.
> They tried and quit.
> They were that bad.

I saw Steely Dan this past summer in Seattle. Amazing show! The
musicianship and sound were the best I have ever heard - bar none!
Exceptional! Becker and Fagen assemble the finest studio assassins and
make them all work together.

annika asked for the warm-up act blowing out the headliner. Easy.
Went to a country performance by The Judds a number of years back in
the Yakima Sundome. A packed house of 7,000 or so. They were rather
good, but, their warm up group named after the two leads guys stole the
show. Their names were Kix Brooks and Ronnie Dunn.

Honorable Mention: While they didn't blow them away, Pablo Cruise did
an amazing show ahead of an equally amazing Doobie Brothers. They two
bands encore'd together for a short set after the Doobie set. This was
1978 and it still is the best concert experience I ever witnessed.



29 Dec 2006 17:16:55
Robert Hamilton
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



annika1980 wrote:

> OK, since this thread has now reached the stage where everyone posts
> their favorite groups that they've seen, here is a question.....
>
> Have you ever seen an opening act that was far better than the main act
> that they were opening for?

My favorite group of all time was Double Trouble, and still is. One of my
cousins worked (still?) for Bryan Adams, and the combination of the two
brings to mind what to me is the mother of all opening acts blowing away
the headliner.

Double Trouble was in NYC to impress some media execs and maybe get a nifty
record deal. Adams was planning a show at The Bottom Line on his birthday
to debut a new album. Whoever books for Adams scheduled Double Trouble to
open for Adams. Because of the Adams thing there was a pretty good crowd of
media types there and I guess others who liked the joint, like say Mick
Jagger et al. Double Trouble, and especially SRV were really stoked about
getting to show off their wares to the big time crowd, and totally burned
the joint down. To top it off, Adams' crew was really hostile towards
Double Trouble, which didn't endear them to anyone who was there. The
review in the NYP said: "Fortunatley, Bryan Adams, the Canadian rocker who
is opening arena dates for Journey, doesn't headline too often. As a
result, he doesn't have to endure being blown off the stage by his opening
act the way it happened at the Bottom Line the other night. By the time
that Texas blues guitarist Stevie Ray Vaughan and his rhythym section were
finished, the stage had been rendered to cinders by the most explosively
original showmanship to grace the New York stage in some time."



29 Dec 2006 13:51:45
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote in message
news:1167378233.873904.37260@s34g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> "R&B" wrote:
>> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote ...
>> >
>> > I'm irritated. Never saw any of those bands or performers you listed.
>> > The price one pays growing up in Klamath Falls, Oregon...aka "the
>> > armpit of Oregon."
>>
>>
>>
>> One of the advantages of spending 25 years in top-40 radio. I saw almost
>> everybody there was to see.
>>
>> Best of all, I saw most of them free. And more often than not, had
>> backstage passes, too.
>>
>> It sure made getting laid a lot easier.
>>
>> "Hey, sweetie, wanna go to the concert with me; we can go backstage and
>> meet
>> the band..."
>>
>> Ah, the good ol' days.
>>
>> Later, when I worked in News/Talk radio, the vibe was much different.
>> "Hey,
>> sweetie, wanna go with me to the garden show where I can introduce you to
>> our station's lawn and garden expert, and we can ask him about perennials
>> and fertilizer?"
>>
>> Didn't have quite the same effect. :-(
>>
>> Randy
>
> Dang funny!
>
> Did you ever see Lynard Skynard b4 the crash? I'd love to see the live
> version of Sweet Home Alabama.
>
> -Greg


I hated Lynyrd Skynyrd. You would never have seen me at a Lynyrd Skynyrd
concert.

I am *so* not about that kind of music.

Randy




29 Dec 2006 10:59:35
annika1980
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


helensilverburg@hotmail.com wrote:
> Back in the early '80's, I had an amazing time going to a concert of
> Pylon. It was one helluva concert! Will never forget that night!
> I can't remember what year it was, (who cares anyway!), but I was
> totally blown-away by attending a concert of Sabbath! My ears are
> still ringing!
> Helen

Well that makes sense since Pylon is my all-time favorite band.
I'm a charter member of the Pylon fan club. I've got the tee shirts,
the records, everything. Heck, even the license plate on my '68 Caddy
said "PYLON."



29 Dec 2006 14:02:12
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com > wrote ...
>
> "R&B" wrote:
>> Personally, I was more of a Van Halen fan during their David Lee Roth
>> days.
>> I never could stand Sammy Hagar.
>>
>> Randy
>
> I like SH's range and the fact that he could play guitar, freeing Eddie
> to do some pretty good stuff on the keyboards. I also like the songs
> they wrote better.
>
> -Greg


Seems like Hagar's addition to Van Halen came at about the same time "heavy
metal" was becoming a huge phenomenon. To me, it just sounded like bands
were trying to get louder and louder, raunchier and raunchier. It became
very much like audio wallpaper to me. You couldn't really differentiate one
band from another, it was all very copycat-ish.

That's why I preferred the Roth Van Halen. At least their stuff had some
diversity in sound. I mean you'd hear a range in sound, from things like
"Jamie's Cryin'" to "Jump." Once Hagar joined the band, it all sounded
about the same, and only a bunch of gear-heads who loved Hagar's licks were
fans.

Being in radio gave me a somewhat different perspective on music. For one
thing, by playing the same songs over and over and over thousands of times,
you really get to where you know every damn lick in a song. And second, by
answering the station's requestline, you get a pretty good feel for who's
out there and wants to hear certain music. When Roth was with the band,
calls came in requesting us to play Van Halen songs from all types of
people -- including lots of women. In fact, I'd say the male-to-female
ratio of callers for Roth-era Van Halen was close to 50-50, or even tipped
slightly female. After Sammy Hagar replaced Roth, that balance changed
dramatically. The only people who phoned in to request Hagar-era Van Halen
songs was a bunch of drugged-out (and dumbed down) guys -- the types you'd
see working at gas stations or in motorcycle shops. It was a striking
change.

Randy




29 Dec 2006 14:11:31
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"glfnaz" <glfnaz@qwesttrash.com > wrote in message
news:45951cdc$0$500$815e3792@news.qwest.net...
>
> "annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com> wrote in message
> news:1167371128.984931.104040@n51g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
>>
>> OK, since this thread has now reached the stage where everyone posts
>> their favorite groups that they've seen, here is a question.....
>>
>> Have you ever seen an opening act that was far better than the main act
>> that they were opening for?
>
> Loggins and Messina was better than 3 Dog Night.
> Neither was on my hit list to see, but the girl I was dating really wanted
> to go.



Watching leaves burn would be better than seeing Three Dog Night. They were
another band that was decent enough in the studio, but absolutely COULD NOT
DO IT live.

By the way, one other "terrible" concert I attended that I should have
mentioned earlier was..........drumroll, please.........

THE OSMONDS.

Yes, dear friends, I went to see the Osmonds back in 1971 during their
heyday as a teen phenom, and while their hit "One Bad Apple" topped the
charts.

I was never a fan. But the station I was working at in Tulsa had been
involved with promotion of the show, and so, we all went. I was curious to
see and hear this phenom. But all I heard for about 2 hours was endless
screaming and screeching by teenage (and probably lots of pre-teen) girls.
The screaming was so loud, I couldn't hear a thing coming from the stage.

But as ear-piercing concerts go, nothing compared to Yes. If any concert I
ever attended did lasting damage to my hearing, it had to be the Yes concert
I attended in 1972. Of course it didn't help that we were seated in the
front row over to the right side of the stage, directly in front of the
giant speakers. Hell, it was so loud, I'm surprised it didn't disintegrate
the hair right off of my head.

Randy




29 Dec 2006 11:49:52
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


annika1980 wrote:
> helensilverburg@hotmail.com wrote:
> > Back in the early '80's, I had an amazing time going to a concert of
> > Pylon. It was one helluva concert! Will never forget that night!
> > I can't remember what year it was, (who cares anyway!), but I was
> > totally blown-away by attending a concert of Sabbath! My ears are
> > still ringing!
> > Helen
>
> Well that makes sense since Pylon is my all-time favorite band.
> I'm a charter member of the Pylon fan club. I've got the tee shirts,
> the records, everything. Heck, even the license plate on my '68 Caddy
> said "PYLON."

Yeah! They are great aren't they? You got tee shirts, etc? Holy
smokes!!
A '68 CADDY??!! Now you have my attention! LOL.
Helen



29 Dec 2006 12:07:09
Dene
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"R&B" wrote:

>
> Seems like Hagar's addition to Van Halen came at about the same time "heavy
> metal" was becoming a huge phenomenon. To me, it just sounded like bands
> were trying to get louder and louder, raunchier and raunchier. It became
> very much like audio wallpaper to me. You couldn't really differentiate one
> band from another, it was all very copycat-ish.
>
> That's why I preferred the Roth Van Halen. At least their stuff had some
> diversity in sound. I mean you'd hear a range in sound, from things like
> "Jamie's Cryin'" to "Jump." Once Hagar joined the band, it all sounded
> about the same, and only a bunch of gear-heads who loved Hagar's licks were
> fans.
>
> Being in radio gave me a somewhat different perspective on music. For one
> thing, by playing the same songs over and over and over thousands of times,
> you really get to where you know every damn lick in a song. And second, by
> answering the station's requestline, you get a pretty good feel for who's
> out there and wants to hear certain music. When Roth was with the band,
> calls came in requesting us to play Van Halen songs from all types of
> people -- including lots of women. In fact, I'd say the male-to-female
> ratio of callers for Roth-era Van Halen was close to 50-50, or even tipped
> slightly female. After Sammy Hagar replaced Roth, that balance changed
> dramatically. The only people who phoned in to request Hagar-era Van Halen
> songs was a bunch of drugged-out (and dumbed down) guys -- the types you'd
> see working at gas stations or in motorcycle shops. It was a striking
> change.
>
> Randy

That's a unique perspective fer sure. I really didn't start paying
attn. to their music until the final years of Van Hagar. I have the
compilation CD's and I find myself ripping through the Roth songs in
order to get to the Hagar stuff. Again, I admire his range, the use of
keyboards, and the lyrics....which seem thoughtful in contrast to "Hot
for the Teacher" and "Running with the Devil."

But......I concede that "Jump" and "Panama" are great songs.

-Greg



29 Dec 2006 12:25:36
dugjustdug
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

On Dec 29, 12:07 pm, "Dene" <gdst...@aol.com > wrote:
> But......I concede that "Jump" and "Panama" are great songs.


"Ice Cream Man". Best. Guitar. Solo. Ever.



29 Dec 2006 17:02:16
Head Shot
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

annika1980 wrote:
> Head Shot wrote:
>> Best: Every Grateful Dead concert I ever saw (200 or so).
>
> Was this a court-ordered punishment?

Jesus told me to go. He said there would be gifts.






29 Dec 2006 17:15:50
Head Shot
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

S McFarlane wrote:
> Best live performance I never witnessed: Frank Zappa, especially his
> mid-70's bands. If I could only see one band from the past, that
> would be the one.

When I was growing up in NY we used to go to Long Island to see Zappa play
on Halloween. He was an interesting cat, to say the least.




29 Dec 2006 17:16:25
Head Shot
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

> "Lee Gordon" <bucketofspam@comcast.net> wrote in message
> Q: What were you most likely to hear someone say at a Greatful Dead
> concert when they ran out of drugs?

I need a miracle bud?




29 Dec 2006 19:09:45
Ben.
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



On Dec 29, 4:15 pm, "Head Shot" <HeadS...@ThePinkMist.com > wrote:
> S McFarlane wrote:
> > Best live performance I never witnessed: Frank Zappa, especially his
> > mid-70's bands. If I could only see one band from the past, that
> > would be the one.When I was growing up in NY we used to go to Long Island to see Zappa play
> on Halloween. He was an interesting cat, to say the least.

No you didn't. Zappa never played Lawn Guy Land on Halloween. From
'72 to '84 he played 10 Halloween shows. One of which was in Passaic,
one was in Chicago, the rest were in The City proper - four at the Felt
Forum in Madison Square Garden(now the Paramount Theatre) and four at
the Palladium in NYC.



30 Dec 2006 04:10:33
Sparky
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


On 29-Dec-2006, "annika1980" <annika1980@aol.com > wrote:

> OK, since this thread has now reached the stage where everyone posts
> their favorite groups that they've seen, here is a question.....
>
> Have you ever seen an opening act that was far better than the main act
> that they were opening for?

This one's easy, it happened every time I saw Mothers Finest open for
someone.
As for best live acts ever:

1. Led Zeppelin, Atlanta 77.
2. Thin Lizzy Agora ballroom
3. Tie with Frank Zappa and Blue Oyster Cult. (saw both numerous times
during the 70's & early 80's)


me




29 Dec 2006 23:23:31
Head Shot
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

Sparky wrote:
> 1. Led Zeppelin, Atlanta 77.

I'm still working on loading all of my tapes into WinTaper; but I just came
across one that might be interesting to you Led Zepp fans. I found a
10-16-68 tape of The New Yardbirds at Marques, :London, England. The
songlist was all songs that they continued to sing when they changed their
name to Led Zeppelin a few months later. They had only been The New
Yardbirds for about a month; so it must be about their 5th concert or so.
Here is a website of photos taken a few weeks earlier at their first ever
show: http://www.angel.dk/zeppelin/Pages/ZEPovers1.html




29 Dec 2006 20:36:02
Ben.
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



On Dec 29, 10:23 pm, "Head Shot" <HeadS...@ThePinkMist.com > wrote:
> Sparky wrote:
> > 1. Led Zeppelin, Atlanta 77.I'm still working on loading all of my tapes into WinTaper; but I just came
> across one that might be interesting to you Led Zepp fans. I found a
> 10-16-68 tape of The New Yardbirds at Marques, :London, England. The
> songlist was all songs that they continued to sing when they changed their
> name to Led Zeppelin a few months later. They had only been The New
> Yardbirds for about a month; so it must be about their 5th concert or so.
> Here is a website of photos taken a few weeks earlier at their first ever
> show: http://www.angel.dk/zeppelin/Pages/ZEPovers1.html

Did you see them in Long Island on Halloween, too?



29 Dec 2006 23:43:38
Head Shot
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

Ben. wrote:
> On Dec 29, 10:23 pm, "Head Shot" <HeadS...@ThePinkMist.com> wrote:
>> Sparky wrote:
>>> 1. Led Zeppelin, Atlanta 77.I'm still working on loading all of my
>>> tapes into WinTaper; but I just came
>> across one that might be interesting to you Led Zepp fans. I found
>> a 10-16-68 tape of The New Yardbirds at Marques, :London, England.
>> The songlist was all songs that they continued to sing when they
>> changed their name to Led Zeppelin a few months later. They had
>> only been The New Yardbirds for about a month; so it must be about
>> their 5th concert or so. Here is a website of photos taken a few
>> weeks earlier at their first ever show:
>> http://www.angel.dk/zeppelin/Pages/ZEPovers1.html
>
> Did you see them in Long Island on Halloween, too?


BWAHAHA. Idiot. ^K




30 Dec 2006 05:27:39
bill-o
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


On 29-Dec-2006, "S McFarlane" <spam@nothanks.com > wrote:

> Best live performance I never witnessed: Frank Zappa, especially his
> mid-70's bands. If I could only see one band from the past, that would be
> the one.

I didn't get to see him for the 1st time till the late 70s, but the Roxy &
Elsewhere live disc is one of my favs.

--
bill-o

A "gimme" can best be defined as an agreement between
two golfers neither of whom can putt very well.


30 Dec 2006 05:38:20
bill-o
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


On 29-Dec-2006, ""R&B"" <noneofyourbusiness@all.com > wrote:

> > Did you ever see Lynard Skynard b4 the crash? I'd love to see the live
> > version of Sweet Home Alabama.

I did in 75 but didn't get to see but one song, Ronnie Van Zant was singing
"Gimme Three Steps" and as he was side-stepping stage left he took 4 steps
and fell off the stage and had to be taken to the hospital along with his
buddy Jack Daniels.

--
bill-o

A "gimme" can best be defined as an agreement between
two golfers neither of whom can putt very well.


30 Dec 2006 05:48:20
bill-o
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


On 29-Dec-2006, ""R&B"" <noneofyourbusiness@all.com > wrote:

> But as ear-piercing concerts go, nothing compared to Yes. If any concert
> I ever attended did lasting damage to my hearing, it had to be the Yes
> concert I attended in 1972.

That honor goes to Ted Nugent July 4, 1977

--
bill-o

A "gimme" can best be defined as an agreement between
two golfers neither of whom can putt very well.


30 Dec 2006 07:02:40
S McFarlane
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


""R&B"" <noneofyourbusiness@all.com > wrote in message
news:3rOdnUuRocq5-wjYnZ2dnUVZ_uyknZ2d@giganews.com...
> "Dene" <gdstrue@aol.com> wrote ...
>>
>> I like SH's range and the fact that he could play guitar, freeing Eddie
>> to do some pretty good stuff on the keyboards. I also like the songs
>> they wrote better.
>>
>> -Greg
>
>
> Seems like Hagar's addition to Van Halen came at about the same time
> "heavy metal" was becoming a huge phenomenon. To me, it just sounded like
> bands were trying to get louder and louder, raunchier and raunchier. It
> became very much like audio wallpaper to me. You couldn't really
> differentiate one band from another, it was all very copycat-ish.
>
> That's why I preferred the Roth Van Halen. At least their stuff had some
> diversity in sound. I mean you'd hear a range in sound, from things like
> "Jamie's Cryin'" to "Jump." Once Hagar joined the band, it all sounded
> about the same, and only a bunch of gear-heads who loved Hagar's licks
> were fans.
>

For me, VH was a really good rock band. Not great, but really good.
Because of the first two years.

I still remember the first time I heard 'Eruption' on the radio, followed up
by 'You Really Got Me'. Now that stuff sounds ooollllddd. But at the time
it made you stop what you were doing. I hadn't heard anything like that
before. Any band that can make you stop in your tracks is at least on to
something. I don't think anyone over the age of 18 at the time would
understand the impact that initial burst had on very young ears. In fact,
VH circa 1980 is definitely up there in terms of rock concert experiences.
They were full of piss and vinegar then, and were showing a bit of promise.
But alas...

After that, it was rapidly down hill. Way before the time Sammy came on
board, it was ho-hum city. It would have taken a genius to resurrect VH
after '1984'. Sammy Hagar is many things, but an artistic genius ain't one
of them. In hindsight, that was unavoidable. There just wasn't any
substance there. A very innovative act for it's time, but it was all skin
deep. They had _a_ good concept. I can't help but think there was more
than a little luck involved.

On the other hand, I can still listen to 'Out on the Weekend' decades after
hearing it for the first time and still have to rewind to hear that sweet
spot again. I can do that with things Neil Young recorded ten years
downstream. A bit more than skin deep...


Scott




30 Dec 2006 07:28:54
Chris Bellomy
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

annika1980 <annika1980@aol.com > wrote:
:
: Have you ever seen an opening act that was far better than the main act
: that they were opening for?

I've been to more shows where I left before the headliner even
started than I can count, dude.

--
Chris Bellomy
C-List Charter Member
http://clist.org/


30 Dec 2006 08:00:01
S McFarlane
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"Ben." <kombi45@yahoo.com > wrote in message
news:1167448185.510312.30310@h40g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>
> No you didn't. Zappa never played Lawn Guy Land on Halloween. From
> '72 to '84 he played 10 Halloween shows. One of which was in Passaic,
> one was in Chicago, the rest were in The City proper - four at the Felt
> Forum in Madison Square Garden(now the Paramount Theatre) and four at
> the Palladium in NYC.

Ahhh, that's the one. The Palladium Christmas shows as captured on 'Zappa
in New York'. I'd give a lot to have been there. 'The Purple
Lagoon/Approximate' on the album contains probably my all-time favorite sax
solo. You almost see it here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kkxf4OyBWIs

That damn Belushi!

Scott




30 Dec 2006 08:03:00
S McFarlane
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


"Head Shot" <HeadShot@ThePinkMist.com > wrote in message news:SQllh.12746

> I'm still working on loading all of my tapes into WinTaper; but I just
> came across one that might be interesting to you Led Zepp fans. I found
> a 10-16-68 tape of The New Yardbirds at Marques, :London, England. The
> songlist was all songs that they continued to sing when they changed their
> name to Led Zeppelin a few months later. They had only been The New
> Yardbirds for about a month; so it must be about their 5th concert or so.
> Here is a website of photos taken a few weeks earlier at their first ever
> show: http://www.angel.dk/zeppelin/Pages/ZEPovers1.html
>

Please provide a way for us to get our grubby little hands on it.
Definitely interested.

Scott




30 Dec 2006 03:57:37
R&B
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

"S McFarlane" <spam@nothanks.com > wrote
>
> They had _a_ good concept. I can't help but think there was more than a
> little luck involved.


Like timing.

It didn't hurt Van Halen that their arc of success was at its peak at about
the same time the world was introduced to MTV.

Randy




30 Dec 2006 05:14:00
Gordo
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...


Ben. wrote:

>
> I see The National isn't the only hot spot for ignorant racist pricks
> in Augusta.

Yeah, seemed that Ringer went a little old school there. Ignorant
comments show true colors.



30 Dec 2006 07:03:10
Ben.
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



On Dec 29, 10:43 pm, "Head Shot" <HeadS...@ThePinkMist.com > wrote:
> Ben. wrote:
> > On Dec 29, 10:23 pm, "Head Shot" <HeadS...@ThePinkMist.com> wrote:
> >> Sparky wrote:
> >>> 1. Led Zeppelin, Atlanta 77.I'm still working on loading all of my
> >>> tapes into WinTaper; but I just came
> >> across one that might be interesting to you Led Zepp fans. I found
> >> a 10-16-68 tape of The New Yardbirds at Marques, :London, England.
> >> The songlist was all songs that they continued to sing when they
> >> changed their name to Led Zeppelin a few months later. They had
> >> only been The New Yardbirds for about a month; so it must be about
> >> their 5th concert or so. Here is a website of photos taken a few
> >> weeks earlier at their first ever show:
> >>http://www.angel.dk/zeppelin/Pages/ZEPovers1.html
>
> > Did you see them in Long Island on Halloween, too?BWAHAHA. Idiot. ^K

Sorry for the harshness, brahstein - I's just funnin' ya. I guess I
can see how you mistook Lawn Guy Land for The City. They do have so
much in common...



30 Dec 2006 13:41:22
Head Shot
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

S McFarlane wrote:
> "Head Shot" <HeadShot@ThePinkMist.com> wrote in message
> news:SQllh.12746
>> I'm still working on loading all of my tapes into WinTaper; but I
>> just came across one that might be interesting to you Led Zepp fans.
>> I found a 10-16-68 tape of The New Yardbirds at Marques, :London,
>> England. The songlist was all songs that they continued to sing
>> when they changed their name to Led Zeppelin a few months later. They had
>> only been The New Yardbirds for about a month; so it must
>> be about their 5th concert or so. Here is a website of photos taken
>> a few weeks earlier at their first ever show:
>> http://www.angel.dk/zeppelin/Pages/ZEPovers1.html
>
> Please provide a way for us to get our grubby little hands on it.
> Definitely interested.


I don't know that my copy is any better than what is available online; but
I do have a two tape deck. I am down below 2 boxes now. I will post it
when I finish. I think it's gonna take me another hour or two and I am
done. What I really want to do some day is get someone to copy the tapes
to CD and he can keep the tapes but just needs to give me a copy of each CD.
Oh; and for the shows I mastered myself I would want the ticket back (I
shove the stub in the tape).


And to the asshole that bitched about Frank Zappa: I might be mistakenly
confusing Manhattan with Long Island. But I did go to more than a few Zappa
Halloween shows. As such, fuck you. And yes; my skin is thick enough that
you can hump my leg from killfile and whine about whatever you wish and it
won't bother me.




30 Dec 2006 18:13:07
Da Ringer.
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

Actually I thought my comment was toned down a bit.

Augusta also had a mayor back in the 80's named Ed McIntyre. He was
arrested, while in office, for taking bribes from developers.

He was convicted and spent a few years in prison. After his civil rights
were restored he ran for mayor again. The sad thing is he almost won by
getting almost all of the "black" vote. The racial makeup of Augusta during
that time was around 52% white and 48% black. That's exactly how the vote
went.

If you want to see racisim in Augusta, goto any "black" part of town and see
how a "white" person is treated. It won't be good.

In my opinion, James Brown had a lot of talent for those that like his kind
of music. But, with his past of drug abuse, spousal abuse and criminal
activities, I sure would not have voted to rename the Civic Center after
him. He already has a statue and a street named for him. What's next? Are
they going to rename Augusta to James Brown, Georgia?

James Brown was a very talented Punk.

Da Ringer


"Gordo" <golfzlf@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1167484440.129609.67410@k21g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> Ben. wrote:
>
>>
>> I see The National isn't the only hot spot for ignorant racist pricks
>> in Augusta.
>
> Yeah, seemed that Ringer went a little old school there. Ignorant
> comments show true colors.
>




30 Dec 2006 17:38:36
Ben.
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...



On Dec 30, 12:41 pm, "Head Shot" <HeadS...@ThePinkMist.com > wrote:

> And to the asshole that bitched about Frank Zappa: <SNIP>
> As such, fuck you. And yes; my skin is thick enough that
> you can hump my leg from killfile and whine about whatever you wish and it
> won't bother me.

Which is clearly why you posted that.



31 Dec 2006 01:32:23
DaveB
Re: The Godfather of Augusta...

On Sat, 30 Dec 2006 18:13:07 -0500, "Da Ringer."
<DaRinger@nowhere.net > wrote:

>Actually I thought my comment was toned down a bit.
>
>Augusta also had a mayor back in the 80's named Ed McIntyre. He was
>arrested, while in office, for taking bribes from developers.
>
>He was convicted and spent a few years in prison. After his civil rights
>were restored he ran for mayor again. The sad thing is he almost won by
>getting almost all of the "black" vote. The racial makeup of Augusta during
>that time was around 52% white and 48% black. That's exactly how the vote
>went.
>
>If you want to see racisim in Augusta, goto any "black" part of town and see
>how a "white" person is treated. It won't be good.
>
>In my opinion, James Brown had a lot of talent for those that like his kind
>of music. But, with his past of drug abuse, spousal abuse and criminal
>activities, I sure would not have voted to rename the Civic Center after
>him. He already has a statue and a street named for him. What's next? Are
>they going to rename Augusta to James Brown, Georgia?
>
>James Brown was a very talented Punk.
>
>Da Ringer
>
>
>"Gordo" <golfzlf@gmail.com> wrote in message
>news:1167484440.129609.67410@k21g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>>
>> Ben. wrote:
>>
>>>
>>> I see The National isn't the only hot spot for ignorant racist pricks
>>> in Augusta.
>>
>> Yeah, seemed that Ringer went a little old school there. Ignorant
>> comments show true colors.
>>
>
>
Did they post that fucking thug's picture in the arena??

James Brown Arena...........nice ring to to it.

He was a thug drug addict and woman beater pure and simple.


Daveb