28 Feb 2005 06:46:51
Crelox
Spine Finder Tool

After reading about spining clubs, etc. and the effects it may have, I
decided to build a spine finder tool for myself. I used the widely
available "recipe" for an inexpensive tool using PVC pipe and radial
bearings. For those who want to try this, I modified the construction
which worked *really* slick.

Sorry, I forget the link to the original insturctions, but it calls for
a sch.40 1" PVC Tee into which a couple of radial bearings are seated
and epoxied. Do this instead. I used a 1" PVC compression tee, and
used bearings I obtained from Lowes. For the radial bearings, they are
measured in mm instead of in. Get two of the 17 mm bearings for the
tee. Unscrew the ends, take out the rubber fittings, and you will find
that the bearings perfectly fit about halfway into the end of the tee.
Simply screw the caps back on and voila! That's it. I think someone
posted a long time ago about doing this. It really works, and takes
about 30 sec. to put this together.

Now that I have the tool, I need a little refresher on how to align the
spines and what they mean. I place the tool in the vice and the butt
end of the shaft through the bearings. I bend the shaft at the tip end
and rotate it until I feel the spines. I can feel the shaft "rolling
over" the spines, and there are two approx. 180 degrees apart (as I
expected). One feels slightly "stronger" or perhaps thicker than the
other (don't know how best to describe it). This seems to be the spine
closest to the "label" on the shaft. Also, where is the exact place
you sohould try to mnark the spine, in the "middle" of feeling the
spine, or just after you roll through it? How should I align them with
respect to the face of the club (or address position)? I just want ot
be sure I understand this so I don't put the shaft in upside down or 90
degrees to the proper orientation. Sorry for rehashing this stuff, but
reading old posts, I'm just making sure I got it right!

Thanks. (I expect Mike Dalecki will be responding to this :) )



28 Feb 2005 10:35:12
Miss Anne Thrope
Re: Spine Finder Tool

Spine finder..............yeah, good luck with THAT!



28 Feb 2005 11:12:13
Mike Dalecki
Re: Spine Finder Tool



Crelox wrote:

> After reading about spining clubs, etc. and the effects it may have, I
> decided to build a spine finder tool for myself. I used the widely
> available "recipe" for an inexpensive tool using PVC pipe and radial
> bearings. For those who want to try this, I modified the construction
> which worked *really* slick.
>
> Sorry, I forget the link to the original insturctions, but it calls for
> a sch.40 1" PVC Tee into which a couple of radial bearings are seated
> and epoxied. Do this instead. I used a 1" PVC compression tee, and
> used bearings I obtained from Lowes. For the radial bearings, they are
> measured in mm instead of in. Get two of the 17 mm bearings for the
> tee. Unscrew the ends, take out the rubber fittings, and you will find
> that the bearings perfectly fit about halfway into the end of the tee.
> Simply screw the caps back on and voila! That's it. I think someone
> posted a long time ago about doing this. It really works, and takes
> about 30 sec. to put this together.
>
> Now that I have the tool, I need a little refresher on how to align the
> spines and what they mean. I place the tool in the vice and the butt
> end of the shaft through the bearings. I bend the shaft at the tip end
> and rotate it until I feel the spines. I can feel the shaft "rolling
> over" the spines, and there are two approx. 180 degrees apart (as I
> expected). One feels slightly "stronger" or perhaps thicker than the
> other (don't know how best to describe it).

That's the one thing about this--once you have felt it, the whole idea
makes sense. Just about impossible to describe, though.

> This seems to be the spine
> closest to the "label" on the shaft. Also, where is the exact place
> you sohould try to mnark the spine, in the "middle" of feeling the
> spine, or just after you roll through it?

In the middle of the spine. I will tell you, though, that I no longer
mark the spine. I don't care about the spine, only the neutral bending
point (NBP) which is the orientation in which the shaft wants to bend
the easiest. I only mark that, and mark it in the middle of that range,
whatever it is. The shaft should actually settle at the NBP, and if you
mark it at the very top (the side of the shaft pointing to the ceiling),
you'll be fine.

> How should I align them with
> respect to the face of the club (or address position)?

I point the NBP at target, i.e., the 9:00 position.

>I just want ot
> be sure I understand this so I don't put the shaft in upside down or 90
> degrees to the proper orientation. Sorry for rehashing this stuff, but
> reading old posts, I'm just making sure I got it right!
>
> Thanks. (I expect Mike Dalecki will be responding to this :) )

Troll!


--
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
Mike Dalecki GCA Accredited Clubmaker http://clubdoctor.com
RSG-Wisconsin 2005 Information: http://dalecki.net/rsgwis2005/
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



28 Feb 2005 09:45:09
Crelox
Re: Spine Finder Tool


> > Also, where is the exact place
> > you sohould try to mnark the spine, in the "middle" of feeling the
> > spine, or just after you roll through it?
>
> In the middle of the spine. I will tell you, though, that I no
longer
> mark the spine. I don't care about the spine, only the neutral
bending
> point (NBP) which is the orientation in which the shaft wants to bend

> the easiest. I only mark that, and mark it in the middle of that
range,
> whatever it is. The shaft should actually settle at the NBP, and if
you
> mark it at the very top (the side of the shaft pointing to the
ceiling),
> you'll be fine.
>
> > How should I align them with
> > respect to the face of the club (or address position)?
>
> I point the NBP at target, i.e., the 9:00 position.
>

I assume the NBP will lie perpendicular to the axis of the two spines.
Is that so? I see what you are saying that the shaft, when held in the
bearings, should roll itself to orient the NBP roughly at the ceiling,
correct? I want to be as accurate as possible without additional
equipment.


> > Thanks. (I expect Mike Dalecki will be responding to this :) )
>
> Troll!
>


Nah, not really. I just know you have a passion for this thing :)
Thanks for the help.

>
---------------------------------------------------------------------------
> Mike Dalecki GCA Accredited Clubmaker http://clubdoctor.com
> RSG-Wisconsin 2005 Information: http://dalecki.net/rsgwis2005/
>
---------------------------------------------------------------------------



01 Mar 2005 09:50:42
david s-a
Re: Spine Finder Tool


"Crelox" <huhta@wideopenwest.com > wrote in message
news:1109612709.146098.124320@f14g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...

>
> I assume the NBP will lie perpendicular to the axis of the two spines.
> Is that so?

Not necessarily. The 'high point' you are feeling is only a nett result
shaft assymetry at the position of the two bearings...which are only a
few inches apart. This may, or may not be, a general indicator of the
material assymetry throughout the length of the shaft. The stronger this
assymetry the better chance you have of locating the spine or the NPB.
It is easier to locate the NPB as you describe because it's position is
unconditionally stable (as in a yacht with a deep heavy keel)....and
the shaft will always return to this position if rotated axially away
from it. I always attempt to find the FLO of the shaft after locating
the NBP by clamping the tip, fitting a 'slip-on' dummy grip, and simply
flick (displace) the butt just an inch or so and watch the vibration
response....rotating the shaft a few degrees either way each time until
the butt is vibrating in a straight line.

This method truly reflects the nett assymetry through the length of the
club, biased if anything to show assymetry at the tip..which is where
you need to know it accurately. Fit the shaft keeping the stiffer NPB
side ( top side of the shaft in the jig ) toward the target, but align
it exactly according to the FLO line. As you can imagine, the FLO line
is not necessarily exactly in line with the NBP....and could be anything
up to 20 or so away from it. Once you have the club 'rough assembled'
check this again by clamping the club at the butt and flicking the head
end....just to make sure that the 'tip clamped' FLO is not fighting the
'butt clamped' FLO. You may need to slightly adjust the alignment to
'average' this out...I personally prefer to favour the 'tip clamped' FLO
alignment.

cheers
david