29 May 2005 18:06:56
Numero Uno
Afridi is performing now - Chucking controversy will start soon

I think Shahid Afridi will be in the chucking controversy soon as he has
started performing more regularly now and one is noticed more when one is
successful.

So, teams will think, there is nothing better than clip his wings now by
declaring him a chucker and that will impact his performance and to me it
looks like as if he is chucking at times, when he bowls the off spin or the
faster one.




29 May 2005 20:46:07
Afzal A. Khan
Re: Afridi is performing now - Chucking controversy will start soon

Numero Uno wrote:
> I think Shahid Afridi will be in the chucking controversy soon as he has
> started performing more regularly now and one is noticed more when one is
> successful.
>
> So, teams will think, there is nothing better than clip his wings now by
> declaring him a chucker and that will impact his performance and to me it
> looks like as if he is chucking at times, when he bowls the off spin or the
> faster one.
>
>



Though this is a tactic employed by certain teams, somehow
I don't think this will happen soon with Afridi. And the main
reason is that they are playing the West Indies. Over the years,
they seem to rely on their strengths, rather than use psycholo-
cal strategies to upset their opponents. That seems more in line
with British and Australian thinking. One can recall any
number of controversies where these two are involved, and not
necessarily against one another. In an earlier era, Australians
(players, journalists and media in general) used to offer advice
to their opponents (mostly the Englishmen) about dropping some
players, selecting others, technique to employ against certain
types of bowling etc. To a neutral observer, such advice at
times seemed genuine. One wasn't so sure on other occasions.
But, usually, the Englishmen took these bits of advice with a
pinch of salt. They thought the Aussies were pulling a fast one
over them. And the Englishmen too were not far behind. I recall
the 1962-63 series Down Under when the series stood one-all
after 4 Tests. On the last day of the fifth Test, the Englishmen
set Australia a target of 241 to be scored in less than 4 hours.
Australia, batting carefully, managed a draw (being 152 for 4 at
the close). After the end of the Test, Dexter blamed the
Aussies for not trying to go for a win. On a wearying pitch,
Allen had already taken three wickets and a win for the English-
men was on the cards if the Aussies had tried to force the pace
and lost their remaining wickets. They would then have lost the
Ashes series. The criticism was hardly justified. Throughout
the series, the Englishmen had been rather negative in their
approach, batting slowly and maintaining a slow over-rate. They
had little right to expect the Aussies to go all out for a win.
Harvey blasted Dexter later, in the media.

But new controversies are bound to surface when these two foes
face each other two months hence. England too have a fairly
formidable side and will run the Aussies close. One can look
forward to fresh psychological ploys before the series begins.

I must say that the West Indian behaviour in the two recent
series (South Africa and now Pakistan) was very very fair.
{I didn't get to see the flare-up between Hinds and Smith}.
But, by and large, the South Africans were the offending party,
Nel being the worst. Over the years, even Shaun Pollock has
been to blame on a number of occasions.



A. A. Khan