29 Sep 2006 10:38:40
David The Hamster Malone
OT: Startup?

Since there isn't much else going on... :-)

Last night was the 16th anniversary of our first meeting, so Mrs
Hamster and I decided to use it as an excuse to eat out. I'd noticed a
brand new restaurant on Markham road which was in an unusual wedge
shape building and obviously Italian (judging by the name). I don't
usually like to patronize 'start-ups' but this looked classy and we
decided to give it a shot.

We were promptly seated beside a window and I was pleasantly surprised
to see expensive linen and top quality silverware on the table. The
wine list was short, but well thought out, and I picked a
middle-of-the-road Cabernet Sauvignon. This arrived shortly with, to my
amusement, two wonderful but inappropriate Riedel Montrachet
(Chardonnay) wine glasses. I knew this for a fact because I have the
identical glasses at home. I asked the waitress if she had any Bordeaux
glasses and she said, "We have hundreds of glasses... I'm afraid I'm
not up on which glasses go with which wines. I've only been doing this
for a week or so." I described a suitable glass with my hands and she
went away and came back with two huge Pinot Noir/Bergundy glasses.
Curious now, I said, "Maybe I should go have a look...?" and she said,
"Sure."

They did have literally hundreds of wine glasses - all Riedel and
dozens of each variation. They were hung in rows from a huge oak
layered rack and must have cost a fortune since an average machine-made
Riedel is over $30 CDN each. My hand-blown Sommelier series ones are
three times that. I asked her if she had labels and she came up with a
roll of white sticky ones and we labeled the rows with grape varietals
for the ones I was familiar with. I know nothing about white wines,
port, cognac, etc. so there were lots still unlabeled... the rest
she'll have to talk to the chef or look up Riedel on the web. I got a
peek at the kitchen which was top-of-the-line stainless everywhere - it
looked sparkling clean. Someone had spent some real money on the best
of everything for this new restaurant. That settled, Mrs Hamster and I
toasted each other with our hard-won Bordeaux glasses...

The food menu was odd. There's no other way to describe it. The dishes
were described in questionable English and there were integer numbers
way over on the far right hand side of each entry. You needed a ruler
to see which numbers corresponded to which descriptions. For a joke, I
said to the waitress, "I'll have number 13...". She looked puzzled
again and then laughed and said, "No... that's the price!" I said,
"Really?" The prices actually were remarkably inexpensive given the
decor and the wine-glasses.

She bought sliced Calabrese bread accompanied by freshly made hummus
liberally doused with olive-oil. A nice touch. The butternut squash
soup was spicy and excellent. The vinaigrette Caesar salad was fresh
and beautifully decorated with paper thin cheese coated wafers. As it
turned out, the main meat and pasta courses were only average IMHHO but
still looked fabulous. The chef had obviously spent as much or more
time plating them up as he did cooking the entrees... desserts were
excellent and made on the premises. Not the best Italian meal I've ever
eaten but not bad for a start-up.

Would I go back... maybe. But I'll give it a few years and see if it
survives first. I have my doubts.

David "The well-fed Hamster" Malone



29 Sep 2006 13:21:16
Ron Hudson
Re: OT: Startup?

Wow, I can't remember which glasses are for Bordeaux. Are those the ones that
look like Mason jars, or are they the ones more like jelly glasses?


Ron





On 29 Sep 2006 10:38:40 -0700, "David The Hamster Malone" <malone@ca.ibm.com >
wrote:

>Since there isn't much else going on... :-)
>
>Last night was the 16th anniversary of our first meeting, so Mrs
>Hamster and I decided to use it as an excuse to eat out. I'd noticed a
>brand new restaurant on Markham road which was in an unusual wedge
>shape building and obviously Italian (judging by the name). I don't
>usually like to patronize 'start-ups' but this looked classy and we
>decided to give it a shot.
>
>We were promptly seated beside a window and I was pleasantly surprised
>to see expensive linen and top quality silverware on the table. The
>wine list was short, but well thought out, and I picked a
>middle-of-the-road Cabernet Sauvignon. This arrived shortly with, to my
>amusement, two wonderful but inappropriate Riedel Montrachet
>(Chardonnay) wine glasses. I knew this for a fact because I have the
>identical glasses at home. I asked the waitress if she had any Bordeaux
>glasses and she said, "We have hundreds of glasses... I'm afraid I'm
>not up on which glasses go with which wines. I've only been doing this
>for a week or so." I described a suitable glass with my hands and she
>went away and came back with two huge Pinot Noir/Bergundy glasses.
>Curious now, I said, "Maybe I should go have a look...?" and she said,
>"Sure."
>
>They did have literally hundreds of wine glasses - all Riedel and
>dozens of each variation. They were hung in rows from a huge oak
>layered rack and must have cost a fortune since an average machine-made
>Riedel is over $30 CDN each. My hand-blown Sommelier series ones are
>three times that. I asked her if she had labels and she came up with a
>roll of white sticky ones and we labeled the rows with grape varietals
>for the ones I was familiar with. I know nothing about white wines,
>port, cognac, etc. so there were lots still unlabeled... the rest
>she'll have to talk to the chef or look up Riedel on the web. I got a
>peek at the kitchen which was top-of-the-line stainless everywhere - it
>looked sparkling clean. Someone had spent some real money on the best
>of everything for this new restaurant. That settled, Mrs Hamster and I
>toasted each other with our hard-won Bordeaux glasses...
>
>The food menu was odd. There's no other way to describe it. The dishes
>were described in questionable English and there were integer numbers
>way over on the far right hand side of each entry. You needed a ruler
>to see which numbers corresponded to which descriptions. For a joke, I
>said to the waitress, "I'll have number 13...". She looked puzzled
>again and then laughed and said, "No... that's the price!" I said,
>"Really?" The prices actually were remarkably inexpensive given the
>decor and the wine-glasses.
>
>She bought sliced Calabrese bread accompanied by freshly made hummus
>liberally doused with olive-oil. A nice touch. The butternut squash
>soup was spicy and excellent. The vinaigrette Caesar salad was fresh
>and beautifully decorated with paper thin cheese coated wafers. As it
>turned out, the main meat and pasta courses were only average IMHHO but
>still looked fabulous. The chef had obviously spent as much or more
>time plating them up as he did cooking the entrees... desserts were
>excellent and made on the premises. Not the best Italian meal I've ever
>eaten but not bad for a start-up.
>
>Would I go back... maybe. But I'll give it a few years and see if it
>survives first. I have my doubts.
>
>David "The well-fed Hamster" Malone


29 Sep 2006 11:28:56
David The Hamster Malone
Re: OT: Startup?


Ron Hudson wrote:
> Wow, I can't remember which glasses are for Bordeaux. Are those the ones that
> look like Mason jars, or are they the ones more like jelly glasses?

YCLIU.... here's a look at all of them...

http://www.winestudio.ca/Riedel%20Wine%20Glasses.htm

What the heck are jelly glasses?

David "The Hamster" Malone



29 Sep 2006 12:29:37
JohnA - Kent,WA.
Re: OT: Startup?


"David The Hamster Malone" wrote

> What the heck are jelly glasses?
>


LOL - I can remember as a kid we had many sets of those glasses. Welches were
my favorite. Who cares if one got broken. You just cleaned up the next one
destined for the trash. My Mom would even put milk in the strawberry ones just
before throwing them in the trash. Ah yes,... strawberry milk drinks. Brings
back some memories.
--
JohnA(Kent,WA)




29 Sep 2006 14:33:12
Ron Hudson
Re: OT: Startup?

On 29 Sep 2006 11:28:56 -0700, "David The Hamster Malone" <malone@ca.ibm.com >
wrote:

>What the heck are jelly glasses?

I can understand you not knowing since it sound like you don't get out much,
what with needing an anniversary as an excuse for your recent sworay. Completing
a bi-monthly lawn mowing qualifies at our house. Anyway, your regular
run-of-the-mill burger emporium around here serves iced tea in jelly glasses.
Only the really uptown BBQ restaurants use mason jars. That way they are able
to offer quantity as well as quality as a part of their fine dining experience.


Here's some examples.


http://www.tias.com/8102/InventoryPage/1597170/1.html


These aren't just the plain old ones either. They are pretty classy. I prefer
the roadrunner model myself.


Ron


29 Sep 2006 19:41:48
John W. Pierce
Re: OT: Startup?

"David The Hamster Malone" <malone@ca.ibm.com > wrote
>
> YCLIU.... here's a look at all of them...
>
> http://www.winestudio.ca/Riedel%20Wine%20Glasses.htm
>
> What the heck are jelly glasses?

Ah, David, David, David.... you're revealing your patrician roots....

Many years ago, it was common among the "other classes" (and may still be
for all I know) to buy "Welch's Grape Jelly" (a jelly-like muck made from,
probably, petroleum by-products and artificial color and flavoring) which,
in combination with a substance called "Skippy Peanut Butter" (peanut butter
being what it vaguely resembled, or would have resembled if you could have
gotten all of the sugar out of it, which would have reduced the bulk by 50%
at a minimum), was spread on flat, thin, square pieces of fluffy partially
dried styrofoam substitute called "Wonder Bread" (for no known reason, since
it bore no resemblance to bread whatsoever), to make "peanut butter and
jelly sandwiches" that were foisted off onto unsuspecting children as "food"
(and, unfortunately, those children often believed what they were told,
which explains much of the problem with the middle and southern portions of
the United States today). This "Welch's Grape Jelly" came in glass
containers with pressed-on (rather than screwed-on) lids (they therefore
had only a slight rim around the top edge of the glass instead of screw
threads) of approximately 12-ounce capacity. When these became empty, they
were washed (usually, anyway) and saved for use as drinking glasses,
especially for children to use for water, milk, Kool-Aid (about which the
less said, the better), etc..

As for the glasses at the link you gave, while they're quite nice, I must
strongly disagree with the use of the "Chianti Classico" for zinfandel, and
I also have my doubts about the "Sauternes" glass.

-- jwp




29 Sep 2006 13:13:39
David The Hamster Malone
Re: OT: Startup?


John W. Pierce wrote:

> Many years ago, it was common among the "other classes" (and may still be
> for all I know) to buy "Welch's Grape Jelly" (a jelly-like muck made from,
> probably, petroleum by-products and artificial color and flavoring)

So if somebody 'welched' on a deal, they were covered in this grape
jelly stuff? Sounds awful...

> This "Welch's Grape Jelly" came in glass
> containers with pressed-on (rather than screwed-on) lids (they therefore
> had only a slight rim around the top edge of the glass instead of screw
> threads) of approximately 12-ounce capacity. When these became empty, they
> were washed (usually, anyway) and saved for use as drinking glasses,
> especially for children to use for water, milk, Kool-Aid (about which the
> less said, the better), etc..

Aah... I think I understand. It was a working class sort of thing then?

> As for the glasses at the link you gave, while they're quite nice, I must
> strongly disagree with the use of the "Chianti Classico" for zinfandel, and

I have to confess that at home I tend to use the Classico - we use it
as a tasting glass - for just about anything I make myself (usually
Italian wines such as Amerone, Sangiovese, Barolo, but also
non-Italians such as Shiraz and Zinfandel). I know... I'm a rube. I
only roll out the 'real' glasses for Pinot Noire and Cbernets.

> I also have my doubts about the "Sauternes" glass.

It does rather look like a pear on a stick...

David "The pear-shaped Hamster" Malone



29 Sep 2006 18:02:11
Dan White
Re: Startup?

"David The Hamster Malone" <malone@ca.ibm.com > wrote in message
news:1159551520.292848.42680@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
> Since there isn't much else going on... :-)
>
> This arrived shortly with, to my
> amusement, two wonderful but inappropriate Riedel Montrachet
> (Chardonnay) wine glasses.


"Inappropriate glasses"? Well Jebus Christ our hamster sucks water out of a
tube with a ball bearing in it, and he's just fine with that.

Talk about putting on airs!

dwhite




29 Sep 2006 19:04:38
Jack Stein
Re: OT: Startup?

David The Hamster Malone wrote:

> Since there isn't much else going on... :-)
> The wine list was short, but well thought out, and I picked a
> middle-of-the-road Cabernet Sauvignon. This arrived shortly with, to my
> amusement, two wonderful but inappropriate Riedel Montrachet
> (Chardonnay) wine glasses.

Sounds like the perfect place to go after banging a few around at COGNAC
AND CUES... How far are you from that pretentious Chicago Pool Parlor?

...and all this time I thought you was a beer drinker...
--
Jack
http://jbstein.com


30 Sep 2006 01:06:07
John W. Pierce
Re: OT: Startup?

"David The Hamster Malone" <malone@ca.ibm.com > wrote
>
> John W. Pierce wrote:
>>
>> I also have my doubts about the "Sauternes" glass.
>
> It does rather look like a pear on a stick...

Right! Would you *really* pour your Chateau d' Y'Quem 1937 in such a thing?
I think not!! Now the Schott Zwiesel Enoteca version is a different story:

http://www.wineware.co.uk/Enoteca+Sauternes+Wine+Glass--109585-details.htm

That's so classically tulip-shaped that I'm told the Dutch trade futures in
them....

-- jwp




01 Oct 2006 03:04:57
tdodge
Re: Startup?


"David The Hamster Malone" <malone@ca.ibm.com > wrote in message
news:1159551520.292848.42680@m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
> Since there isn't much else going on... :-)

friggin' wine nazis. Upstate NY is infested with them, what with numerous
wineries in my neck of the woods. One master gave me the true secret..
wine is mouthwash, nothing more, nothing less...the rest is smoke and
mirrors,
and elitists trying to impress each other. Ya' oughta hear the
vocabulary...hilarious!
One of the wineries is now brewing the nastiest beer I've ever had, and
passing it off
as something special. It's unique, I guess.
/gimmie a good single malt, if you please, in a little fat glass with ice.




01 Oct 2006 01:45:21
pltrgyst
Re: Startup?

On Sun, 01 Oct 2006 03:04:57 GMT, "tdodge" <NOSPAMbluesman@stny.rr.com > wrote:

>friggin' wine nazis. Upstate NY is infested with them, what with numerous
>wineries in my neck of the woods. One master gave me the true secret..
>wine is mouthwash, nothing more, nothing less...

Some of us actually drink wine with every supper, unless it's something that
cries out for ale, such as highly-seasoned Asian or Mexican food.

>the rest is smoke and mirrors, and elitists trying to impress each other.
>Ya' oughta hear the vocabulary...hilarious!

Vocabulary is the most difficult aspect of discussing any food or drink, so it
often seems stilted.

>gimmie a good single malt, if you please, in a little fat glass with ice.

If you drink a single malt over ice, the only function of which is to dull the
taste buds, you're dumber than a post -- and you don't really appreciate whisky.

-- Larry (who has *never* tasted any New York wine which seemed drinkable.
Socially laudable, in the case of Bully Hill, but never enjoyable.)


01 Oct 2006 09:37:43
Roger Orsulak
Re: Startup?


"pltrgyst" <pltrgyst@spamlessxhost.org > wrote in message
news:13luh2htkmajmmk2c73nse5gttamtevjde@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 01 Oct 2006 03:04:57 GMT, "tdodge" <NOSPAMbluesman@stny.rr.com>
> wrote:
>

> If you drink a single malt over ice, the only function of which is to dull
> the
> taste buds, you're dumber than a post -- and you don't really appreciate
> whisky.
>
> -- Larry (who has *never* tasted any New York wine which seemed drinkable.
> Socially laudable, in the case of Bully Hill, but never enjoyable.)

OK, Larry. It's time I asked. Give me a lesson about Scotch whiskey and
the significance of single malt vs. ?.

Roger - in search of knowledge.




01 Oct 2006 10:09:54
Jack Stein
Re: Startup?

tdodge wrote:

> /gimmie a good single malt, if you please, in a little fat glass with ice.

You can put ice in wine, who cares, but ruin a good brew with ice...
It's blasphemous!

--
Jack
http://jbstein.com


01 Oct 2006 13:10:14
Roger Orsulak
Re: Startup?


"Jack Stein" <jbstein2@comcast.net > wrote in message
news:ZL2dnZL-_LquUYLYnZ2dnUVZ_qKdnZ2d@comcast.com...
> tdodge wrote:
>
>> /gimmie a good single malt, if you please, in a little fat glass with
>> ice.
>
> You can put ice in wine, who cares, but ruin a good brew with ice... It's
> blasphemous!
>
> --
> Jack
> http://jbstein.com

Jack:
I think he's referring to Scotch. Does your admonition still hold?
Roger




01 Oct 2006 17:54:58
pltrgyst
Re: Startup?

On Sun, 1 Oct 2006 09:37:43 -0400, "Roger Orsulak" <normorsulak@cox.net > wrote:

>OK, Larry. It's time I asked. Give me a lesson about Scotch whiskey and
>the significance of single malt vs. ?.
>
>Roger - in search of knowledge.

Drinking is the best teacher! 8;)

Well, Scotch is properly (and legally) referred to as "whisky". Whiskies made
elsewhere (bourbon, rye, etc.) are generally called "whiskey" in the singular
(there are a very few misguided exceptions, from North America and Asia, which
specifically use the "whisky" spelling on their labels.)

A good intro is here: http://www.smwsa.com/whisky.html.

To sum it up:

Scotch whisky produced at a specific distillery, from either malted barley or
grain, is called, respectively, single malt or single grain whisky. It may
contain distillate produced in one or more years (e.g., Macallan, The Glenlivet,
Talisker, Ardbeg).

A blend of single malts is called a vatted malt (e.g., Pot Dhubh, Glen Salen,
Sheep Dip, anything described only as "pure malt").

A blend of single malts along with single grain whisky is called a blended
whisky (e.g., Johnny Walker, Famous Grouse, Chivas Regal, etc.).

Slainte!

-- Larry




01 Oct 2006 18:14:14
JimBoCt
Re: OT: Startup?


Hamster saz: Blah,blah,blah

You my good sir are a glass snob andd in these parts we'd serve your
swine in paper cups.

Jim <-------Likes the big red plastic keg party cups



02 Oct 2006 06:25:35
David The Hamster Malone
Re: Startup?


Dan White wrote:

> "Inappropriate glasses"? Well Jebus Christ our hamster sucks water out of a
> tube with a ball bearing in it, and he's just fine with that.

Your hamster has no class... he may as well be a gerbil.

David "The Hamster" Malone



02 Oct 2006 06:29:57
David The Hamster Malone
Re: OT: Startup?


Jack Stein wrote:

> Sounds like the perfect place to go after banging a few around at COGNAC
> AND CUES... How far are you from that pretentious Chicago Pool Parlor?

If a restaurant is pretentious, they need to get it right. Or a Pool
parlor come to that.

> ...and all this time I thought you was a beer drinker...

I drink wine with my dinner. Frankly it makes the food taste better. I
drink beer anytime because I like it... playing pool for instance.

David "The I'll drink anything Hamster" Malone



02 Oct 2006 06:34:42
David The Hamster Malone
Re: OT: Startup?


JimBoCt wrote:

> You my good sir are a glass snob

Is that anything like being a cue snob? :-)

> andd in these parts we'd serve your swine in paper cups.

Don't you go getting my swine drunk... there's nothing worse than a hog
with a few drinks in him.

Sheesh.

David "The Hamster" Malone



02 Oct 2006 09:36:26
pltrgyst
Re: Startup?

On Fri, 29 Sep 2006 18:02:11 -0400, "Dan White" <dwhite300@comcast.net > wrote:

>...Well Jebus Christ our hamster sucks water out of a
>tube with a ball bearing in it, and he's just fine with that.

Well, sure -- he's probably afraid that if he complains, you'll nail him to a
little cross.

-- Larry


02 Oct 2006 09:39:01
Jack Stein
Re: Startup?

>>tdodge wrote:
>>>/gimmie a good single malt, if you please, in a little fat glass with
>>>ice.

>>You can put ice in wine, who cares, but ruin a good brew with ice... It's
>>blasphemous!

> Roger Orsulak wrote:
> Jack:
> I think he's referring to Scotch. Does your admonition still hold?

Nah, but then I normally stay far away from all non carbonated drinks
unless it's water. Beer, water, thats about it. An occasional Bloody
Mary if hot enough. So, the admonition changes to a YUCK!
--
Jack
http://jbstein.com


02 Oct 2006 06:41:07
David The Hamster Malone
Re: Startup?


pltrgyst wrote:

> Well, sure -- he's probably afraid that if he complains, you'll nail him to a
> little cross.

That would make me a little cross...

David "The Hamster" Malone



02 Oct 2006 09:42:51
pltrgyst
Re: OT: Startup?

On 1 Oct 2006 18:14:14 -0700, "JimBoCt" <jimboct@aol.com > wrote:

>... in these parts we'd serve your swine in paper cups.

So that's the new business venture that's been keeping you away from RSB --
"JimBo's Cup o'Pork [and drive-through synogogue]."

-- Larry (with apologies to the "First Church of the Gooey Death and Discount
House of Worship" and Billy Bob Briggs...)


02 Oct 2006 08:23:39
How to drink scotch like a real man

Allow me to put my 2 centavos in here. You boys are beginning to go
after each other but that does not take much as RSB is like a kennel of
pit bulls having a bad hair day.
You are mostly banditos with bad attitudes.

1st I am the leading RSB expert on this subject having drank 100,000
shots of scotch, experience do count in this puppy big time.

Pissing down the toilet a half million bucks now bothers me some but at
the time it seemed like the cool thing to do. No worries mate, fortune
10 companies I worked for gave me an unlimited expense accounts and
they paid for most of it and me American express platinum card billed
to them. My life was in sales and drinking with clients was a big part
of that. I wrote over $50,000,000 in sales on bar napkins drunk in a
bar. The other $50,000,000 I closed on a golf course or in the country
club bar after the round. It's always been the big three to me, the
3 P's, panther piss, pussy and pool in that order. Get those 3 right
and you live a life of fun and enjoyment. All the rest don't matta
no how as Lamata youse to say.

I drink me whiskey laddies in a Ball Mason Kerr jar 5" tall & 2
l/2" across at the top & because I drop them a lot and they bounce
and don't break easily. They are thick and strong. Yes I have fine
crystal I use when nice people come over. I just broke a long nice
wine glass with a 6" long stem on it when I laid it down in the sink
drainer it cracked. If I had been drinking my Cabernet in my Kerr jar
that would not have happened. I had guests and put out the good stuff
and you guessed it, she-yit happens. My favorite glasses for scotch I
buy at the Masters in Augusta which are 4" tall and 3" across at
the top. If you want to make an on the rocks it works well. When I
want to make a strong drink I use this glass.

Drinking it neat or on the rocks is bull she-yit, do that a lot and
long term you will burn a hole in your Esophagus and die, or destroy
the lining of your stomach. Fill the glass up with ice and water so
the whiskey goes thru with out damage to your liver, which is why after
100,000 my liver still checks out fine which totally amazes me, I
should be fookin dead long ago. In 1972 my doctor told me son how did
you get in this condition, if you don't stop drinking you wont live
to see 1980. Since then I have out lived 9 doctors who were
teetotalers and the stress killed them all.

I was taught how to drink scotch by the RAF ace who flew in the Battle
of Britain and hired me to run his company in the mid 60's. He
wanted to go fight and the Americans were sitting this one out so he
went to Canada, became a spitfire pilot and asked to be shipped off to
the RAF to fight the Jerries. The Jerries shot him down twice and
when he crashed he broke both legs so they shipped him off to Scotland
to protect him as pilots were their most valuable asset. 6 months
later he heals, goes back up, takes out 3 jerries, they shoot him down
and he breaks both legs again. It saved his life for when he healed it
was all over and the Americans brought him home as at the time they
needed hero's to sell war bonds and to tour. Of the original group,
only 7 survived. It was a sucide mission but the lads were defending
their families and their way of life, Johnnie became the techinal
adviser on the war movies being made in Hollywood during the war and
drank with one of the biggest scotch drinkers ever, Errol Flynn. His
best pal, Craig Stevens was breaking into the movies and later became
the immortal Peter Gunn. Many times the 3 of us went through a bottle
of J&B which was what they both liked to drink.

Never in the course of human history, had so many owed so much too so
few. They were out of everything in those dark days, even pain killing
morphine. We were sending over supplies and the Kraut U boats were
sinking it all. They were going down and it looked like nothing could
save them from fatso's Luftwaffe. They would sit a bottle of scotch
by his bed and say, laddie drink this and soon you will be feelin no
pain.
You can have all you want. The distillery is only a mashie niblick
away.

The Luftwaffe consisted of air units that made up the majority of the
German airforce, as well as Fallschrimj=E4ger units, Luftwaffe Field
Divisions, the elite Herman G=F6ring ground formations, thousands of
smaller anti-aircraft, engineer, communications and security units, and
a fair number of Luftwaffe naval vessels and formations as well.
Between 1939 and 1945 over 3.4 million served in the Luftwaffe. Over
165,000 were killed, over 155,000 went missing and over 192,000 were
wounded. Of the 7361 men awarded the inital grade of the highest German
combat honor of WWII, the Knights Cross, 1785 were from the Luftwaffe
making up 24% of the total awaded.

Initially the Luftwaffe ruled the skies but thereafter fought an
increasingly futile war of attrition which when combined with vital
mistakes in aircraft production and utilization, was its death knoll.
In the face of this the Luftwaffe produced the most successful air aces
of all time. As well, the feats of the Fallschirmj=E4ger in the first
airborne operations in history are as heroic as they are tragic. German
paratroops suffered appaling losses on Crete and essentially never saw
large scale airborne operations again. Some Luftwaffe ground units
fought well during WWII, such as certain Luftwaffe field divisions and
the elite Hermann G=F6ring formations, while other units simply served.

Ultimately the structure of the Luftwaffe was a grand relfection of its
commander, Hermann G=F6ring. He strove more so than any other branch to
create a personal army with responsibilities as far reaching as
possible. It was partly due to this that the Wehrmacht was ultimately
defeated. The strain on resources and man power such political
manuvering had was far reaching.

The Luftwaffe was offically disbanded in August of 1946 by the Allied
Control Commission.

The Battle of Britain is about to begin...Let us therefore brace
ourselves to our duties, and so bear ourselves that, if the British
Empire and its Commonwealth last for a thousand years, men will still
say, 'This was their finest hour.'"
Address to the House of Commons
Winston Churchill 1940
As a prerequisite to the invasion, Hitler ordered that the RAF be
eliminated before any ground troops be landed. Therefore, the Battle of
Britain was not fought by land forces, but in the air. In August of
1940, the German Luftwaffe (air force) began daylight raids and attacks
upon England.
The attacks concentrated upon ports where the Royal Navy had ships and
on airfields where the RAF was based. The German Luftwaffe was able to
throw large numbers of fighter and bomber planes at a small number of
British fighters. The tactics took a terrible toll on the RAF pilots
and planes, but radar stations along the coast aided the British.
The radar stations allowed the British to identify and track German
movements. This allowed the RAF to put valuable planes in the path of
German bombers. The tactic allowed the RAF to rest pilots, and defend
England, during the most important threats.
Frustration at not being able to eliminate the RAF caused Hitler to
change tactics. He ordered that his bomber attack civilians in the
cities of England. It was hoped that the English people would be
terrorized and would call for a peace treaty. The change in tactics
allowed the RAF to replace losses and pilots. The British people
refused to be intimidated and give in. The failure of Luftwaffe bombers
to bring England to her knees forced Hitler to call off the invasion 17
September 1940.



"Never in the field of human conflict was so much owed by so many to so
few"
Tribute to the Royal Air Force
Winston Churchill 1940





I was born during this war time in American and me mom had a tough
delivery and lost a massive amount of blood. She remembers the nurse
telling the doctor if we don't give her a transfusion she will die.
The doctor said, we are out of blood as it's all going to the boys
over seas and we have none for the civilians. All we can do is pray
for the lady. She survived but it took her a year for the blood to
rebuild and for her to regain her strength.

I followed Johnnie's advice and after 40 years of drinking I am still
in fine shape. Always measure your shot which I use a jigger 1.5 ozs.
My daily limit is now 4 and I never drink until after 5pm. You must
control it, or it will control you.

Single malt is for snobs trying to impress some lassie and most of
these bozos do not know she-yit about drinking. The entire idea of
scotch is to blend a dozen single malts into a taste that is pleasing.
If you are a laddie sitting on the river next to the distillery then
you drink the single malt closest to ya because it's cheap. The
entire single malt is just another marketing campaign to sell cheap
shit to yuppies and charge them an arm and a leg over what the real
fair price should be. If they advertise it enough, you ass holes will
buy it, i.e. case in point Corona that she-yit is formaldehyde
embalming fluid. You can't drink that she-yit with out the lime. Try
and put a lime in a long neck bud and see what it now tastes like?
That has been the two biggest cons in booze pushed on us in decades,
single malts and corona. You guys wanna be cool and have the latest
thing in their hands and marketers know this and play you boys like a
fiddle.

Get a good blend and be happy. The best ones there. Drink cheap, old
smuggler, fine whiskey, very dark and not watered down and the best one
for the buck out there. Most can not tell it from Johnny Walker which
I like the red, hate the black, love the gold and the blue is beyond
description. Swing and or Dimple are my favorite and in a 12 Pinch
rules.

I have some really nice expensive scotches and cognacs in my house but
no single malt.
FL, REAL MAN, NO YUPPIE.

Go into www.poolchat.net and open up fastlarry reviews column. There
I review everything, including whiskey and beer along with pool things.
=20

www.fastlarrypool.com



02 Oct 2006 08:33:19
Re: How to drink scotch like a real man

May God bless and peace be with you. May there now be peace between us.
If you are a real pool player, then fast truly loves you. May the wind
be always on your back and all 9 balls fall.
VENI VIDI VICI, OMNIA VINCIT AMOR. "Latin for "I came, I saw, I
conquered, love conquerors all. Yes I really did do it all and you can
believe it, or not. If you don't believe it, C'est La Vie. " Shoot
straight, innovate, never give up, just run out on the other guy then
there is no way for you to lose. believe it, or not. If you don't
believe it, C'est La Vie. " "Winners make things happen. Losers let
things happen."Winners NEVER QUIT, QUITTERS NEVER WIN. They say FL can
not play. Then explain why he is on the Upa web site ranked 35th in
the world in mid 2006. All truth passes through three stages. First
it is ridiculed. Second it is violently opposed. Third it is accepted
as being self-evident. - Arthur Schopenhauer (1788
********************************************************************
Lead me, follow me or get the hell out of my way. Do one of the three
please? Come celebrate the wonder of this beautiful game with me and
become a student of it.
Be my friend, walk my way, flow with what I teach you and you will soar
like the Eagle into levels of excellence you never dreamed possible.
Play by feel, not by systems; do not make a simple game complicated. Go
with what you know, go with what is natural.

"Winners make things happen. Losers let things happen." In the words of
Vince Lombardi, "When it comes to the future, there are three kinds of
people: those who let it happen, those who make it happen, and those
who wonder what happened." Vince said you've got to pay the price.
Winning is not a sometime thing, it's an all the time thing. Winning
is a habit, unfortunately so is losing. Vince Lombardi once said,
"The quality of a person's life is in direct proportion to their
commitment to excellence, regardless of their chosen field of
profession or endeavor. Fast Eddy said about the same thing in the
color of money.
Winning is everything. Winning is the only thing. If you can dream
it, see it, believe it, you can do it and you can be it. You can
perform totally out of the box deep into the Zone, one with the shot,
freewheeling fast and loose with no fear. Then you are a person with
no limits who can achieve anything he can imagine that a human body is
capable of producing. "FL"
Show me a guy who does not mind losing and I will show you a sausage.
Show me a good loser and I will show you a loser. "FL" "Nice
guys finish last" quote from Lou Durocher
"Do, or do not. There is no 'try'." - Yoda
Conquer your fear and you conquer the game, the battle, your life and
your fear of death. There is nothing impossible to him who will try.
Alexander The Great 320 BC.
When you play, repeat over and over, No fear. Just freewheel and let
the good times roll. Keep holding the cue as lightly as possible and
keep saying, fast and loose.

It is all about visualization, focus, concentration and playing in the
zone. You just see it, feel it, do it: It does not get any deeper
than this? Play pool with an empty mind. "FL"

"Flow with what ever may happen and let your mind be free: Stay
centered by accepting what ever you are doing and what ever comes your
way."
Chuang-Tzu.

Opportunities multiply as they are seized." - Sun Tzu

Fortune favors the brave. Virgil, Aeneid Roman epic poet (70 BC - 19
BC)

Conquer your fear and you conquer the game, the battle, your life and
your fear of death. There is nothing impossible to him who will try.
Alexander The Great 320 BC.

For a man thinks within himself, so he is." Proverbs 23:7 "I can
do all things through Christ who gives me strength." Philippians
4:13

In order to master pool you must first learn how to master yourself and
your emotions. "For to conquer in battle a thousand men a thousand
times, means you have now conquered yourself and you are now the
greatest of warriors" Dharmapada.

This is a feel game and a mind game. When the mind is pure, pure
perfect pool will follow. Perfect pool comes from being taught how to
practice perfect. Being in dead punch is the ultimate trip and reward
from that. "FL"



07 Oct 2006 19:19:23
Roger Orsulak
OT pltrgyst & whisky


"pltrgyst" <pltrgyst@spamlessxhost.org > wrote in message
news:oid0i2p3qtqs5gh02htej2h4iuic9204p5@4ax.com...
> On Sun, 1 Oct 2006 09:37:43 -0400, "Roger Orsulak" <normorsulak@cox.net>
> wrote:
>
>>OK, Larry. It's time I asked. Give me a lesson about Scotch whiskey and
>>the significance of single malt vs. ?.
>>
>>Roger - in search of knowledge.
>
> Drinking is the best teacher! 8;)
>
>

etc. snip a lot of good stuff

> Slainte!
>
> -- Larry
>
>

First opportunity to say thanks for the direction ("Drinking is the best
teacher!")
Still confused about the "hierarchy" of snobbishness among single malts,
vatted malts, and blended whisky. Is there one? It seems that the words
single malt seems to pour off the lips of those in the know as the most
desirable. Now, I must sa that I did manage to have some "blended whisky"
Johnny Walker Blue Label that was left under an airplane seat and it was
very nice indeed.

Roger




07 Oct 2006 23:04:19
pltrgyst
Re: OT pltrgyst & whisky

On Sat, 7 Oct 2006 19:19:23 -0400, "Roger Orsulak" <normorsulak@cox.net > wrote:

>First opportunity to say thanks for the direction ("Drinking is the best
>teacher!")

You're welcome.

>Still confused about the "hierarchy" of snobbishness among single malts,
>vatted malts, and blended whisky. Is there one?

You've got it right there. But drinking single malts anywhere but in Scotland is
a comparatively recent (since 1970) development. Before that, all the highest
regarded Scotches were vatted.

>It seems that the words
>single malt seems to pour off the lips of those in the know as the most
>desirable.

It's a cult thing. But most of the people who drink single malts would be
appalled at the idea of drinking all the component wines of a great Bordeaux
separately. 8;)

Now a few single grain whiskies are available as well, but they haven't caught
on. They're decidedly an acquired taste.

Most of the single malt drinkers I know experiment with creating their own
vattings, using less-favored singles, or the ends of bottles. I do that a lot --
but then I tend to blend wines and beers a lot too (drives my wife nuts when I
blend beers, especially if one of them is hers!)

We actually have a club in the DC area which meets frequently (in an Irish pub,
I'm sad to say) for the express purpose of creating and tasting whisky blends.
It's a lot of fun.

>Now, I must say that I did manage to have some "blended whisky"
>Johnny Walker Blue Label that was left under an airplane seat and it was
>very nice indeed.

That's like found money!

JW Blue is indeed very nice, if greatly overpriced. It is a vatting
(technically, rather than a blend, since there is no grain whisky in it) which
was created explicitly by JW to separate Japanese air travelers from their
money. For the first few years of its existence, it was available only on
trans-Pacific flights to preserve its cachet. Now its well-established
everywhere.

Enjoy -- Larry (headed to Chicago tomorrow, home of Binny's and Sam's Liquors.
There may be a new bottle or two in my short-term future...)


07 Oct 2006 20:21:57
Re: OT pltrgyst & whisky

only outer barbarians make their wiskey out of corn laddies. Any man
who has JW blue across his lips gains my respect.



08 Oct 2006 09:27:25
Roger Orsulak
Re: OT pltrgyst & whisky


"pltrgyst" <pltrgyst@spamlessxhost.org > wrote in message
news:l0qgi2te1dlfqegkt32pe7gd4gddvmmajc@4ax.com...
> On Sat, 7 Oct 2006 19:19:23 -0400, "Roger Orsulak" <normorsulak@cox.net>
> wrote:
>
s a lot of fun.
>
>>Now, I must say that I did manage to have some "blended whisky"
>>Johnny Walker Blue Label that was left under an airplane seat and it was
>>very nice indeed.
>
> That's like found money!
>
> JW Blue is indeed very nice, if greatly overpriced. It is a vatting
> (technically, rather than a blend, since there is no grain whisky in it)
> which
> was created explicitly by JW to separate Japanese air travelers from their
> money. For the first few years of its existence, it was available only on
> trans-Pacific flights to preserve its cachet. Now its well-established
> everywhere.
>

Yeah, a buddy and I finished it off over two flights, but only after asking
the pilot if it was finders-keepers. Phil and I kept it a secret from the
others.

Thanks for the explanation. This is what I was looking for.

Roger - prefers his Negronis with Bombay Sapphire and Punt E Mes.