29 Sep 2003 08:54:01
Serena
Not another board length question

Hi,

I'm a beginner/intermediate snowboarder, have about 10 days under my
belt. I learned to ride in Hunter Mtn. in NY when I was interning
there last season.

I have an opportunity to buy Burton Feelgood, but torn between 144 and
148. I'll be riding the board in Colorado this season, but in New
Zealand after that (i.e. can get real icy here!)

I'm 5' tall and 110 lb (fluctuating wildly). I learned on Burton
Cruzer 140, but did fine on 145 (I didn't know that I was riding
longer board - I only noticed it after I had a great day on it!) and
thought Burton Feather 147 was too soft.

Cheers,

Serena

(Hmmm... I could buy both and sell the other one in New Zealand)


29 Sep 2003 16:14:38
Mike T
Re: Not another board length question

> I have an opportunity to buy Burton Feelgood, but torn between 144 and
> 148. I'll be riding the board in Colorado this season, but in New
> Zealand after that (i.e. can get real icy here!)

My wife has a Feelgood 155 from the 99-00 season. She has ridden it at
weights as low as 115 and as high as 140 (rode through 1st 5 months of
pregnancy, albeit not as hard as usual) and it worked very well for her.
If she were 140 and riding hard I suspect she would have found it too
soft.

The '04 models come in 144 and 149 so you're probably looking at a
previous year's model.

For the '04 model both the 144 and 149 have a recommended weight range
of 85 - 135. The longer one will float better in powder and be
slightly more stable at speed - the shorter one will be able to carve
slightly tighter turns and be easier to spin. So it comes down to how
you like to ride! My recommendation would be if you're mainly doing
freestyle go with the shorter one and if you're mainly doing
all-mountain riding go with the longer one.

Do you need the board before you get to Colorado? If not you might also
look into something made locally - a Donek Incline 145 (www.donek.com)
My wife has the 150 in that model. She rides that instead of her
Feelgood unless it's 2 feet plus of new light powder. It crushes her
Burton hands down on hard pack. You could order and have it waiting
for you when you arrive!

Mike T














30 Sep 2003 07:50:49
Switters
Re: Not another board length question

On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 15:54:01 GMT, spar126@ec.auckland.ac.nz (Serena)
allegedly wrote:

> (Hmmm... I could buy both and sell the other one in New Zealand)

Sounds like a plan, if you think you can make some money - or at least,
not lose any money on it!

I don't know what the flex is like on the Feelgood. It's a tough call and
like Mike says, is probably more down to you. Can you demo the board
first? I'd try the longer board first, if you have trouble turning it,
then go for the shorter one.

Unfortunately there is no hard and fast formulae for this stuff! :)

- Dave.

--
The only powder to get high on, falls from the sky.
http://www.vpas.org/- Snowboarding the worlds pow pow -
Securing your e-mail

The Snowboard FAQ lives here - http://rssFAQ.org/


01 Oct 2003 13:56:58
Serena
Re: Not another board length question

Yes, I've looked at Donek Incline 145, the length is perfect, but
wouldn't it be too stiff? I'm not too good a snowboarder yet! I also
have W6 feet. I was thinking of starting off on Feelgood. I was
thinking of coming home with Donek, because I'll be riding mainly in
New Zealand after Colorado.

Serena



"Mike T" <mtovino@yaw-who.com > wrote in message news:<OTYdb.21909$Wd7.2767@nwrddc03.gnilink.net>...
> > I have an opportunity to buy Burton Feelgood, but torn between 144 and
> > 148. I'll be riding the board in Colorado this season, but in New
> > Zealand after that (i.e. can get real icy here!)
>
> My wife has a Feelgood 155 from the 99-00 season. She has ridden it at
> weights as low as 115 and as high as 140 (rode through 1st 5 months of
> pregnancy, albeit not as hard as usual) and it worked very well for her.
> If she were 140 and riding hard I suspect she would have found it too
> soft.
>
> The '04 models come in 144 and 149 so you're probably looking at a
> previous year's model.
>
> For the '04 model both the 144 and 149 have a recommended weight range
> of 85 - 135. The longer one will float better in powder and be
> slightly more stable at speed - the shorter one will be able to carve
> slightly tighter turns and be easier to spin. So it comes down to how
> you like to ride! My recommendation would be if you're mainly doing
> freestyle go with the shorter one and if you're mainly doing
> all-mountain riding go with the longer one.
>
> Do you need the board before you get to Colorado? If not you might also
> look into something made locally - a Donek Incline 145 (www.donek.com)
> My wife has the 150 in that model. She rides that instead of her
> Feelgood unless it's 2 feet plus of new light powder. It crushes her
> Burton hands down on hard pack. You could order and have it waiting
> for you when you arrive!
>
> Mike T


01 Oct 2003 22:36:03
Mike T
Re: Not another board length question

> Yes, I've looked at Donek Incline 145, the length is perfect, but
> wouldn't it be too stiff? I'm not too good a snowboarder yet! I also
> have W6 feet. I was thinking of starting off on Feelgood. I was
> thinking of coming home with Donek, because I'll be riding mainly in
> New Zealand after Colorado.

As far as foot size goes: assuming that W6 is a US W6, or about 23.5
Mondo point, both boards are in your range. The Feelgoods at 23.8 cm
wide are about as wide as you would want to go. (My wife is a 6W/23.5,
so I'm using her setup as a reference - her boot tips are overhanging by
less than 1/8" off her Feelgood at 12/3 angles) The Incline 145 is a
23.3 cm waist which will give you a bit more overhang, closer to 3/8" on
either side which IMHO is, for most people, ideal.

Now about stiffness: The Donek will be stiffer than the Burton. The
question is how stiff is too stiff for you? The Donek will almost
certainly be more stable than the Feelgood, better at speed, better at
carving. The Feelgood will be easier to "twist" with your feet if you
like to do that soft of thing - for example, to navigate through moguls.
The Feelgood actually has a mellower sidecut than the Incline 145 (it is
*very unusual* for a Donek to have a tighter sidecut than a Burton that
the same person would buy - but this time it does!!!!). The numbers
are close there, close enough that you might not notice much difference,
especially between the 144 Feelgood and the 145 Donek.

Overall: If you want a board that is more precise handing, and more
stable, and better at carving, I'd recommend the Incline 145. If you
want a more surfy feel, I'd recommend the Feelgood 149. Durability
wise my wife's Doneks have both fared better than her Feelgood,
especially on the base. Also I hear the new Doneks have a virtually
indestructible topsheet. I'd definitely go Donek for New Zealand but
if you think you'll get nothing but powder in CO I could see the
argument for a Feelgood 149.


Mike T















01 Oct 2003 23:04:17
My Name
Re: Not another board length question

Let me offer something that hasn't been mentioned yet.

If you'll be riding on ice you'll appreciate the extra edge of a longer
board, the more edge the better edge hold you will have.

If you'll be riding in powder you'll appreciate the extra float of a longer
board, at 10 days under your belt you likely don't have a real favorite
riding style down yet, you probably just enjoy riding in general, and
therefore an all mountain board should serve you well during your learning
and progressing. Some people make a big deal of having the right type of
board for the style of riding you do. I wouldn't worry too much about
getting the "RIGHT" board, the first 3 years of my snowboarding career was
on rental boards of varying size and quality. It made me realize that the
biggest factor is SKILL, not board, as long as you have a decent board and
you have (or develop) skills you'll be fine. When you're learning I would
say you should have as neutral a board as possible, meaning all mountain
with a medium flex suited to your weight that you neither have a serious
problem overflexing or underflexing in different riding conditions, that way
you're riding the board instead of the board riding you. Alternatively a
board a bit longer than you're comfortable with will, for the right person,
give you a push and speed up your learning because you have to grow into the
board. I'm 5' 11" and I actually have a 149 that I ride somewhat frequently,
I normally ride a 161 but there's something fun about short boards in the
right conditions, and generally speaking I can ride just as well and on the
same runs on a 149 as a 161. When I ride a 163+ I feel a bit off, but after
a few runs I can feel I'm pushing myself to ride the board instead of
letting the board ride me.

Also, pay attention to sidecuts as these determine a boards turning radius,
and thus perceived maneuverability, when carving. It's possible for you to
find a 150 that has a smaller sidecut radius than a 145, thereby giving the
150 with the smaller sidecut radius the ability to make tighter carves than
the 145, of course this assumes you're actually "carving" as in there is
zero skid in your turns and your edge to edge transitions are fast, which,
at 10 days riding is unlikely. My 161 has a larger sidecut radius than my
friends 166.

Good luck

-Tom
AASI 187640

"Serena" <spar126@ec.auckland.ac.nz > wrote in message
news:b1b29168.0309290754.56b382cc@posting.google.com...
> Hi,
>
> I'm a beginner/intermediate snowboarder, have about 10 days under my
> belt. I learned to ride in Hunter Mtn. in NY when I was interning
> there last season.
>
> I have an opportunity to buy Burton Feelgood, but torn between 144 and
> 148. I'll be riding the board in Colorado this season, but in New
> Zealand after that (i.e. can get real icy here!)
>
> I'm 5' tall and 110 lb (fluctuating wildly). I learned on Burton
> Cruzer 140, but did fine on 145 (I didn't know that I was riding
> longer board - I only noticed it after I had a great day on it!) and
> thought Burton Feather 147 was too soft.
>
> Cheers,
>
> Serena
>
> (Hmmm... I could buy both and sell the other one in New Zealand)


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