31 Oct 2007 04:28:13
joseph.santaniello@gmail.com
V2 Aero 150?

Hi All,

I just went out for my first roller-ski session of the year, and
probably my third ever. The reason I haven't used them much is the
vibration numbs my feet, and I don't want to get run over by a car.

I have Swenor combi's with a ratchet wheel, but I am more interested
in double poling or occasionaly skating, so this isn't a feature I
need. On snow I split my time 50-50 skate and classic, but for roller
skiing I'm mostly interested in the upper body.

I've been thinking about skate roller skis, but I already can get
going faster than I want to go, so th elarger harder skate wheels are
scaring me off. There are numerous dirt roads around here where ther
eis no danger of getting run over, so I'm leaning toward some V2 Aero
150's. So here are a few questions:

Is my 99kg too much for them?

How rough/soft terrain will they be able to deal with?

Is there something else I should be looking at?

Joseph



31 Oct 2007 08:50:52
Re: V2 Aero 150?

You'll need a smooth dirt road for any rollerski to work. Aeros or
Elpex Off Road. For double poling and occasional skating on pavement,
what's wrong with the combis? People use those all the time for dp
practice with classic or skate poles. If you want more speed than a
combi, swap out the ratcheted wheels.

"joseph.santaniello@gmail.com" <joseph.santaniello@gmail.com > wrote:

>Hi All,
>
>I just went out for my first roller-ski session of the year, and
>probably my third ever. The reason I haven't used them much is the
>vibration numbs my feet, and I don't want to get run over by a car.
>
>I have Swenor combi's with a ratchet wheel, but I am more interested
>in double poling or occasionaly skating, so this isn't a feature I
>need. On snow I split my time 50-50 skate and classic, but for roller
>skiing I'm mostly interested in the upper body.
>
>I've been thinking about skate roller skis, but I already can get
>going faster than I want to go, so th elarger harder skate wheels are
>scaring me off. There are numerous dirt roads around here where ther
>eis no danger of getting run over, so I'm leaning toward some V2 Aero
>150's. So here are a few questions:
>
>Is my 99kg too much for them?
>
>How rough/soft terrain will they be able to deal with?
>
>Is there something else I should be looking at?
>
>Joseph
>


31 Oct 2007 09:54:55
Matt
Re: V2 Aero 150?

Joseph:

I have V2-150s with unfortunately too few miles. My comments:

I think they are good on "good" dirt roads. They roll over a lot of thing
but won't roll over everything. 1/2" stones will easily stop them if you
are going slowly. The faster you go the more easily they roll over small
obstructions but of course the more you will hurt when they don't. They do
not work well on trails that have rocks and/or roots, .... You can use them
for those conditions but it's a real struggle. Not worth the effort in my
eyes.

They feel a bit clunky but in reality I think they open up a world of new
opportunities. I like them because I can do a long ski on roads that I
would ride my bike on, no matter the size of the hills. The speed reducers
work well. They have to because this is a fast ski - way too fast without
some resistance. The only place I don't use some resistance is on steep
uphills. I don't have the brakes but would like to try them out. I've not
had any flats but it will definitely impact your enjoyment if you have one &
need to walk home. This is a big deficiency in my eyes. I guess I could
carry a spare tube & pump in a pack but that's a PITA.

I have a pair of Marwe's also. This is the best ski for most conditions on
mostly good paved roads. They don't have speed reducers but are a
considerably slower ski to start with. I've been told that they have a "max
velocity" that prevents them from getting out of control on big hills. I
haven't tried that just because I haven't had them on any hills that were
short enough to try it out on. You will never get a flat on a Marwe!

I can't help you with the weight question.

MOO,
Matt

<joseph.santaniello@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1193830093.545096.259140@o3g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
> Hi All,
>
> I just went out for my first roller-ski session of the year, and
> probably my third ever. The reason I haven't used them much is the
> vibration numbs my feet, and I don't want to get run over by a car.
>
> I have Swenor combi's with a ratchet wheel, but I am more interested
> in double poling or occasionaly skating, so this isn't a feature I
> need. On snow I split my time 50-50 skate and classic, but for roller
> skiing I'm mostly interested in the upper body.
>
> I've been thinking about skate roller skis, but I already can get
> going faster than I want to go, so th elarger harder skate wheels are
> scaring me off. There are numerous dirt roads around here where ther
> eis no danger of getting run over, so I'm leaning toward some V2 Aero
> 150's. So here are a few questions:
>
> Is my 99kg too much for them?
>
> How rough/soft terrain will they be able to deal with?
>
> Is there something else I should be looking at?
>
> Joseph
>




31 Oct 2007 12:38:35
joseph.santaniello@gmail.com
Re: V2 Aero 150?

On Oct 31, 2:50 pm, ro...@invalid.net wrote:
> You'll need a smooth dirt road for any rollerski to work. Aeros or
> Elpex Off Road. For double poling and occasional skating on pavement,
> what's wrong with the combis? People use those all the time for dp
> practice with classic or skate poles. If you want more speed than a
> combi, swap out the ratcheted wheels.

I don't like roller skiing on the paved roads because they are rough,
and the high stone count in the asphalt means my poles slip more than
I'd like. I also don't want to get run over, so I'd prefer to do all
my skiing on the myriad dirt roads that have no traffic at all, rather
than the one paved road that has all the cars. Another thing I don't
like about the combi is how much they steer when leaned. I believe
this is from the wide wheel.

I may just be being picky, but I think my weight is significant here.
Regular wheels squish down too much and are super slow and sluggish,
but harder wheels would be even more harsh on the rough surface. I
like th eidea of having pneumatic wheels to be able to adjust that
myself, as long as I'm not over the upper limit from the start.

Joseph



31 Oct 2007 12:41:52
joseph.santaniello@gmail.com
Re: V2 Aero 150?

On Oct 31, 2:54 pm, "Matt" <mattlockrLoves2...@adelphia.net > wrote:
> Joseph:
>
> I have V2-150s with unfortunately too few miles. My comments:
>
> I think they are good on "good" dirt roads. They roll over a lot of thing
> but won't roll over everything. 1/2" stones will easily stop them if you
> are going slowly. The faster you go the more easily they roll over small
> obstructions but of course the more you will hurt when they don't. They do
> not work well on trails that have rocks and/or roots, .... You can use them
> for those conditions but it's a real struggle. Not worth the effort in my
> eyes.
>
> They feel a bit clunky but in reality I think they open up a world of new
> opportunities. I like them because I can do a long ski on roads that I
> would ride my bike on, no matter the size of the hills. The speed reducers
> work well. They have to because this is a fast ski - way too fast without
> some resistance. The only place I don't use some resistance is on steep
> uphills. I don't have the brakes but would like to try them out. I've not
> had any flats but it will definitely impact your enjoyment if you have one &
> need to walk home. This is a big deficiency in my eyes. I guess I could
> carry a spare tube & pump in a pack but that's a PITA.
>
> I have a pair of Marwe's also. This is the best ski for most conditions on
> mostly good paved roads. They don't have speed reducers but are a
> considerably slower ski to start with. I've been told that they have a "max
> velocity" that prevents them from getting out of control on big hills. I
> haven't tried that just because I haven't had them on any hills that were
> short enough to try it out on. You will never get a flat on a Marwe!
>
> I can't help you with the weight question.

I have a whole bunch of pretty good condition dirt roads that sound
like they would be ideal. I can deal with a flat occasionally if the
skis get me out there.

How much do you weigh?

Joseph




31 Oct 2007 23:46:09
gr
Re: V2 Aero 150?

joseph.santaniello@gmail.com wrote:
> Hi All,
>
> I just went out for my first roller-ski session of the year, and
> probably my third ever. The reason I haven't used them much is the
> vibration numbs my feet, and I don't want to get run over by a car.
>
> I have Swenor combi's with a ratchet wheel, but I am more interested
> in double poling or occasionaly skating, so this isn't a feature I
> need. On snow I split my time 50-50 skate and classic, but for roller
> skiing I'm mostly interested in the upper body.
>
> I've been thinking about skate roller skis, but I already can get
> going faster than I want to go, so th elarger harder skate wheels are
> scaring me off. There are numerous dirt roads around here where ther
> eis no danger of getting run over, so I'm leaning toward some V2 Aero
> 150's. So here are a few questions:
>
> Is my 99kg too much for them?
>
> How rough/soft terrain will they be able to deal with?
>
> Is there something else I should be looking at?
>
> Joseph
>
I tried a pair on demo this past summer and found they were very draggy
on pretty firm stone dust paths. Only the hardest of dirt would be decent.
On asphalt they were quite fast, but I could not get over my paronoia of
falling on the hard stuff. On pretty smooth road the ride was ok, on
brand new road (parking lot actually) with fine asphalt topping, the
ride was smooth as real skis.
I had trouble with the top glued on velcro strap breaking off also
(these were the version that used hiking boots)

gr


31 Oct 2007 21:33:53
pebo
Re: V2 Aero 150?

joseph.santaniello@gmail.com wrote:
>
> Is my 99kg too much for them?
Well, it's certainly worth considering, in my opinion. I weigh only 67
kg, so the 150s are plenty tough for my normal use. However, I had a
fairly "mild" crash once -- just fell forward and skidded a bit -- but
when I got up and tried to continue skiing, the forks of one ski were
bent in all 3 planes so badly that I could barely use it on the way
home. I was able, after a couple hours of effort on my workbench, to get
it back into alignment but I realized in the process that the forks are
very soft, thin aluminum -- easy to bend!
>
> How rough/soft terrain will they be able to deal with?
Although it's possible to make forward progress on dirt roads, I don't
find it at all enjoyable. If you must cross patches of loose gravel they
are better than skis with smaller wheels, but still hazardous. I DO like
the 150s for rough-surface pavement, for example on heavily chip-sealed
roads. They take the hard edge off the vibration and make it possible
to move along quite well. They also enable you to get over the
occasional expansion joint or other rough break that you may not always
be prepared for. Overall, I think the 150s are great, but you shouldn't
expect too much of them for use on surfaces other than pavement.
>
> Is there something else I should be looking at?
That I don't know. Maybe the CatSki(?) but I have no experience with it.

-Peter


31 Oct 2007 23:07:44
pebo
Re: V2 Aero 150?

joseph.santaniello@gmail.com wrote:
> I don't like roller skiing on the paved roads because they are rough,
> and the high stone count in the asphalt means my poles slip more than
> I'd like.

Ah, that's a different problem, and perhaps OT for this thread, but. . .
1) Make sure you have good quality carbide tips on your poles
2) Get any one of several forms of diamond abrasive tools (I use a small
inexpensive tile cutting blade mounted on an arbor that I chuck into my
drill press and run at low RPM)
3) Sharpen the tips before EVERY roller ski session, like razor sharp!
This makes a tremendous difference in the confidence with which you can
go about your double-poling; you can get plenty of grip on pavement with
properly sharpened poles.
-Peter


04 Nov 2007 15:10:59
Derick Fay
Re: V2 Aero 150?

I realized in the process that the forks are
> very soft, thin aluminum -- easy to bend!
>
>
You're not kidding. I've been having a heck of a time getting my 150s
to track straight this fall -- at some point, and I have no idea when,
the rear fork on the R ski got bent while in the ski box on top of my
car. I'm a little nervous b/c I feel like the process of bending the
aluminum back must weaken the metal....