16 Jun 2007 07:38:11
Larry
Breathing

Hi,

I find that I'm out of breath too quickly, especially when I'm skate-
rollerskiing with poles. With no poles, it is a little easier since
I'm only doing half the work. I know it must be at least in part due
to lack of balance - changing feet more frequently, and poling
accordingly. Apart from this, is there a general breathing technique?

Thanks!



18 Jun 2007 09:56:46
runcyclexcski@yahoo.com
Re: Breathing

do the breathing problems happen only with rollers, or with any sport?
How fit are you generally (e.g. resting HR?)



20 Jun 2007 06:53:31
Larry
Re: Breathing

Back when I jogged (before discovering roller skiing), I generally
fared better in terms of endurance, although I never really exerted
myself too much. I also do some strength training (sit-ups, push-ups,
pull-ups) a couple of times a week. My resting heart rate is about
60-65 per min. I think what's different with skiing is that the upper
body is much more actively involved, even at lower speed. When
running, I generally stay with breathing in and out on 4 steps, or 3
steps when accelerating. When skiing, I try to exhale when I pole to
maximize the push-off. By definition, my breathing cycle accelerates.



20 Jun 2007 14:49:42
Jim
Re: Breathing

I recall having some trouble getting "out of breath" rollerskiing V2
initially until I found a breathing cadence that worked. I ended up
having to do an "odd" sequence where the exhale did not always occur
during the same power stroke.
Actually, "odd" breathing sequences seem to work better for me for all
strokes because they keep me from favoring one side or the other.
-Jim



20 Jun 2007 16:05:25
Re: Breathing

On Jun 20, 8:53 am, Larry <vmarfit...@yahoo.com > wrote:
> Back when I jogged (before discovering roller skiing), I generally
> fared better in terms of endurance, although I never really exerted
> myself too much. I also do some strength training (sit-ups, push-ups,
> pull-ups) a couple of times a week. My resting heart rate is about
> 60-65 per min. I think what's different with skiing is that the upper
> body is much more actively involved, even at lower speed. When
> running, I generally stay with breathing in and out on 4 steps, or 3
> steps when accelerating. When skiing, I try to exhale when I pole to
> maximize the push-off. By definition, my breathing cycle accelerates.

A major part of it is that you are now using both arms and legs to
propel yourself. The more muscles involved the more oxygen is
required. But I'm betting an even bigger reason for a reasonably fit
person is that you just can't relax on rollerskis and possibly
technique inefficiencies. You didn't say how accomplished a skater
you are but When I first began I couldn't skate for more than 100 yds
with dying of exhaustion. After a few months of practice and lessons
I could ski 10k non-stop with no improvement in fitness. Muscle
tension is a great waster of energy. You need to relax and have
efficient technique. I see this with a lot of my students in the
instructional club I run. They can not relax enough and their balance
is not good enough to allow them to use the aerobic fitness they
have. Work on balance and relaxation. That is harder on rollerskis
than on snow however



20 Jun 2007 13:04:46
runcyclexcski@yahoo.com
Re: Breathing

I find skiing much easier than running. For me the intensity increases
in the following order : run - > ski -> bike.

I don't think there is a particlar breathing technique that is skiing-
specific. You may feel better as you get better at it. Plus, there can
be hyperventilation due to being nervious about falling.

If you are really worried you may get checked for asthma and for heart
issues. Speaking of asthma, breathing through the nose to minimise
allgen exposure of the lungs is imporant. Nordic skiers have the
highest percentage of asthma among all sports.



23 Jun 2007 10:48:05
Jan Gerrit Klok
Re: Breathing


<runcyclexcski@yahoo.com > schreef in bericht
news:1182369886.313888.131200@i38g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
> Nordic skiers have the
> highest percentage of asthma among all sports.
No kidding? I didn't know that. Does it have to do with location? More
asthma where winters actually exist?

I started looking at Nordic skiing more seriously *because* of an asthma
condition that pretty much seemed to rule out sport for June through
October.
This week, after week, I tried my usual lunch run again, and the asthma just
prevented me running at my usual (record) pace. I ended up resting and
walking quite a bit.
Racing my bike to work when I'm already late is less of a problem, easier to
take a small step back. Also, I don't reach critical VO2 intake as easily on
the bike.

I ordered a Powerbreath machine, which should help some.




23 Jun 2007 02:01:15
runcyclexcski@yahoo.com
Re: Breathing

On Jun 23, 1:48 am, "Jan Gerrit Klok"
<jgkloknos...@nospamkabelfoon.nl > wrote:
> <runcyclexc...@yahoo.com> schreef in berichtnews:1182369886.313888.131200@i38g2000prf.googlegroups.com...> Nordic skiers have the
> > highest percentage of asthma among all sports.
>
> No kidding? I didn't know that. Does it have to do with location? More
> asthma where winters actually exist?
>

Do a search in Google Scholar for "asthma elite cross country skiers".
I have most papers in .pdf since I have an institutional subscrption.
email me privately if you need the information.

Asthma is a complex condition, and one can not answer "why" easily.
THe most common answer - breathing cold dry air at high intensity
through the mouth bypasses the nasal cavity where the air is supposed
to be warmed up and humdified, and this unconditioned air penetrates
all the way to small airways. Often times asthma goes undiagnosed,
since it does not necessarily cause airway constriction, but the
inflammation in the lungs is present. Then you need a trigger (like a
cold or a hard race) when airway constiction develops.

I can go on and on.



23 Jun 2007 08:39:57
Re: Breathing

"runcyclexcski@yahoo.com" <runcyclexcski@yahoo.com > wrote:
>Do a search in Google Scholar for "asthma elite cross country skiers".

Interesting look up. One small study concluded that, "that dietary
fish oil supplementation has a markedly protective effect in
suppressing EIB in elite athletes, and this may be attributed to their
antiinflammatory properties." EIB = exercise-induced
bronchoconstriction. Another that there is a marked difference in
reaction in asthma test results between coastal climates and more
inland dry ones (higher) in x-c skiers. Alaskan sled dogs don't
escape the problem, either. But it's not just cold, since swimmers
also have a high prevalence of asthma. However, in general high level
training is thought to contribute to the development of airway
hyperresponsiveness and symptomatic asthma, which is apparently why
asthma is being increasingly claimed by athletes across all elite
sports. There must be a continuum on this, since endurance exercise,
such as marathon running (milder climate), seems to similarly affect
non-asthmatics of all ages.

Then there's another, perhaps more significant breathing problem, the
whole subject of Exercise-induced arterial hypoxemia (EIAH) - lack of
oxygen in the blood at high efforts - which affects many fit athletes
of all ages in ways that are not understood. A short scientific
summary article, "Is the healthy respiratory system (always)
built for exercise?", is at
http://jap.physiology.org/cgi/content/abstract/87/6/1997?ijkey=c1a2c0ce8983e64d38a595c0309d97b177fd4803&keytype2=tf_ipsecsha
(fifth article down). A popular version and suggestion for dealing
with EIAH in training is at
http://www.runnersweb.com/running/rw_news_frameset.html?http://www.runnersweb.com/running/news/rw_news_20050715_RRN_EIAH.html.

rm