27 Jun 2004 20:58:53
bullshark
Boynton Freeze report

Saturday Morning:
The gods smile with 90F clear skies, 80F water.
Visibility in the 50-70 foot range and a screaming North current.
Guest stars for the day were a bite-tailed bullshark, a remora
covered nurse sleeping in the open, the hide-behind loggerheads,
and a very cooperative flying gunard among the usual throngs of
more common reef critters. The highlight of the day must have been
when ascending from the safety stop on the first dive. It took
about ten minutes because we were swarmed with dolphin (fish)
who were quite curious and swam round and round, and closer
and closer for a better look. The water was clear, the Sun was high
and their colors rivaled anything I've ever seen in the water.

Saturday Afternoon:
The gods frowned. Water temps dropped to a nearly undivable 77
degrees anywhere below 37 feet. Seas whipped up to nearly 2 feet,
and the visibility dropped considerably. Its difficult to tell "what"
because there were all kinds of thermal distortions in any distance.
On the plus side, current fell to near zero making this flag-dragger
much happier. On the second (fourth) dive we opted to dive the top reef,
something we never do, and flew over "Gods Spot". With the hard bottom at
about 45, Ms bullshark could fly the edge of the warmth just 7-8 feet off
the bottom. The dive is aptly named. I wound up a ton of monofilament and
as so often happens, right after being nice to the reef, the reef
returned the favor.

There in a hole right where I finished, were two large, sleepy Green
Morays who came out to thank me personal-like. Green Morays are
not all that special, but just this day we had all been talking about
their recent scarcity on the reef. They handed us off to a pair of
"Sailfin Tangs". These are pacific exotica from someones fish tank.
They showed off for us while they gave us a grand tour of Gods spot.

Sunday morning:
The gods have turned their backs.
Outside there is 69F water running West. Meanwhile, on top of the reef,
warm water is driving East, and the whole mess is running North at about
Mach I. Flag handling has never been more fun. Did I mention that
the visibility is right up there with phlegm? Well, who knows what
we saw, because we weren't there to dive it. I did have first hand reports
from divers that were, and they were calling me all morning because they
couldn't believe how much it sucked.

Sometimes it's good to stay home, but I don't know when.

safe diving,

bullshark


28 Jun 2004 02:03:10
TonyP
Re: Boynton Freeze report

bullshark wrote:

> Saturday Morning:
> The gods smile with 90F clear skies, 80F water.
> Visibility in the 50-70 foot range and a screaming North current.
> Guest stars for the day were a bite-tailed bullshark, a remora
> covered nurse sleeping in the open, the hide-behind loggerheads,
> and a very cooperative flying gunard among the usual throngs of
> more common reef critters. The highlight of the day must have been
> when ascending from the safety stop on the first dive. It took
> about ten minutes because we were swarmed with dolphin (fish)
> who were quite curious and swam round and round, and closer
> and closer for a better look. The water was clear, the Sun was high
> and their colors rivaled anything I've ever seen in the water.

The dolphin fish.. they are edible, right?

> Saturday Afternoon:
> The gods frowned. Water temps dropped to a nearly undivable 77
> degrees anywhere below 37 feet. Seas whipped up to nearly 2 feet,
> and the visibility dropped considerably. Its difficult to tell "what"
> because there were all kinds of thermal distortions in any distance.
> On the plus side, current fell to near zero making this flag-dragger
> much happier. On the second (fourth) dive we opted to dive the top reef,
> something we never do, and flew over "Gods Spot". With the hard bottom at
> about 45, Ms bullshark could fly the edge of the warmth just 7-8 feet off
> the bottom. The dive is aptly named. I wound up a ton of monofilament and
> as so often happens, right after being nice to the reef, the reef
> returned the favor.

We would consider this type of report an anomaly. On a 'hot' day of
diving, the surface temp will be in the low 70's with depth temp low to
mid 60's. That's a heat wave here. Makes me want to pull out my wetsuit.
2' waves are the norm. We won't go out when they are 5-7' with quick
intervals. Makes for a beating on the ride out, SI, and ride back. The
last time I was out with 4-6 footers, it took me a while to time the
wave set so I could make it to the dive boat ladder. From there, I had a
death grip as I was dunked like a well used tea bag. No, I didn't make a
second dive that day.

> There in a hole right where I finished, were two large, sleepy Green
> Morays who came out to thank me personal-like. Green Morays are
> not all that special, but just this day we had all been talking about
> their recent scarcity on the reef. They handed us off to a pair of
> "Sailfin Tangs". These are pacific exotica from someones fish tank.
> They showed off for us while they gave us a grand tour of Gods spot.

I would guess then that the tangs are surviving.
We get tropicals up here traveling the currents. I feel for them since
they will not last too long. If not eaten, they will starve to death.
And they always are 'friendly'. There was once a large queen trigger so
desparately looking for a friend that the fish would follow the divers
from the hang line to the ladder. Each diver.

> safe diving,
>
> bullshark

As always, to you and the Mrs



28 Jun 2004 13:27:55
mike gray
Re: Boynton Freeze report

bullshark wrote:

> Saturday Afternoon:
> The gods frowned. Water temps dropped to a nearly undivable 77
> degrees anywhere below 37 feet.

73 degrees on the outside.

Although I had foolishly worn my summer suit, I luckily still had the
ice scraper for my mask attached.

But froze me arse off.



29 Jun 2004 02:16:24
Limey Dave
Pompano conditions, was: Boynton Freeze report


"mike gray" <scrubadub@att.net > wrote in message
news:v1VDc.153338$Gx4.80204@bgtnsc04-news.ops.worldnet.att.net...
> bullshark wrote:
>
> > Saturday Afternoon:
> > The gods frowned. Water temps dropped to a nearly undivable 77
> > degrees anywhere below 37 feet.
>
> 73 degrees on the outside.
>
> Although I had foolishly worn my summer suit, I luckily still had the
> ice scraper for my mask attached.
>
> But froze me arse off.
>
Same here. Registered a 1.8 knot north current from the boat GPS. My
estimate had been 1.5 when I got back to the boat from tying into the
Captain Dan and I'm usually conservative. It dropped off considerably near
70-75' and the wreck was easily diveable and quite enjoyable. I too suffered
from the ice-like conditions. About 77 at the surface and dropping to a
frigid 74 below about 50'.
I envy bullsharks day, I would love to see a school of dolphin, I always
imagine their color to be so much more exciting while they're in the water
rather than in the boat. Instead, I had the pleasure of two relative rookies
on their nitrox checkout dives and their instructor/ supervisor. One of the
divers, the large, macho and obnoxious one of the bunch, strangely enough
;), decided to spend *all* his surface time feeding the marine life that
would quickly gather around the boat to share his breakfast. I actually used
someone as a human shield at some point. ;0) Again, the seas were a sloppy
2-3 at worst and vis was prolly in the 40' range. Far from my best day
diving "Dirty old Pompano" but far from a bad day too. Try again next week.

Dave.