28 Jun 2004 21:20:05
scody
Using HR to pace my first running marathon

In another post (thanks for all the responses) I shared that I just recieved
an HRM for father's day.

Can/Should I use it to:
A. Pace my long runs and eventual (no time goal... just to finish)
marathon?
B. Estimate how long it will take me to finish?

If A is true... then, I presume that B. is somewhat true.
Today, I went out for a quick 4 mile run with the goal of staying at 65-70%
of my estimaged Max HR. I was saddened to see it sooooo slow. I mean... my
normal 9:30 pace was slashed to 12:00. EGAD! The run felt wonderful.... but
I was crushed to find out how slow I should be :)

If I were estimating my marathon pace keeping my HR at 70%, (not adjusting
for cardiac creep), I run a 12 minute mile for the marathon?

Any thoughts?

Thanks!




29 Jun 2004 01:16:42
Bumper
Re: Using HR to pace my first running marathon

HRM's are for training. The basic theory is to: one, keep you from
working too hard on easy (recovery) days, and two, make sure you are
working hard enough on the hard days. By keeping records you can work
out a best guesstimate of what your finishing time might be (a better
way would be to run some shorter races, 10K's and a half marathon and
use one of the formulas to predict your marathon finishing time)

On race day go by time, a three week taper combined with super hydration
and super nutrition, plus the excitement of the moment will tend to
throw your "normal" HR right out the window. Anyway for your first-
concentrate on finishing. They are a lot more fun that way.

scody <scody@saddleback.edu > wrote:

> In another post (thanks for all the responses) I shared that I just recieved
> an HRM for father's day.
>
> Can/Should I use it to:
> A. Pace my long runs and eventual (no time goal... just to finish)
> marathon?
> B. Estimate how long it will take me to finish?
>
> If A is true... then, I presume that B. is somewhat true.
> Today, I went out for a quick 4 mile run with the goal of staying at 65-70%
> of my estimaged Max HR. I was saddened to see it sooooo slow. I mean... my
> normal 9:30 pace was slashed to 12:00. EGAD! The run felt wonderful.... but
> I was crushed to find out how slow I should be :)
>
> If I were estimating my marathon pace keeping my HR at 70%, (not adjusting
> for cardiac creep), I run a 12 minute mile for the marathon?
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks!


29 Jun 2004 08:50:20
gentolm
Re: Using HR to pace my first running marathon

i run and train 4 marathon with a hrm
your 70% is between 142--160??
it will get better as your heart get stronger
i was crushed too but i got over it
irun every other day @ 70 % then on the other days i do my interval and
tempo run
plodzilla


scody wrote:
>
> In another post (thanks for all the responses) I shared that I just recieved
> an HRM for father's day.
>
> Can/Should I use it to:
> A. Pace my long runs and eventual (no time goal... just to finish)
> marathon?
> B. Estimate how long it will take me to finish?
>
> If A is true... then, I presume that B. is somewhat true.
> Today, I went out for a quick 4 mile run with the goal of staying at 65-70%
> of my estimaged Max HR. I was saddened to see it sooooo slow. I mean... my
> normal 9:30 pace was slashed to 12:00. EGAD! The run felt wonderful.... but
> I was crushed to find out how slow I should be :)
>
> If I were estimating my marathon pace keeping my HR at 70%, (not adjusting
> for cardiac creep), I run a 12 minute mile for the marathon?
>
> Any thoughts?
>
> Thanks!


29 Jun 2004 12:27:55
Tony
Re: Using HR to pace my first running marathon

scody wrote in message ...
>In another post (thanks for all the responses) I shared that I just
recieved
>an HRM for father's day.
>
>Can/Should I use it to:
>A. Pace my long runs and eventual (no time goal... just to finish)
>marathon?

Once you learn how to use it as one but not the only measure of your effort,
then yes, a HRM can be helpful in pacing long runs, and even your marathon
after the first few miles of excitement settle out.

>B. Estimate how long it will take me to finish?

Others will probably post on estimating your marathon time from the times of
shorter races you've done (if any), but you will get a better feel for this
over time as you put in some longer runs in training, with or without a HRM.

>
>If A is true... then, I presume that B. is somewhat true.
>Today, I went out for a quick 4 mile run with the goal of staying at 65-70%
>of my estimaged Max HR. I was saddened to see it sooooo slow. I mean... my
>normal 9:30 pace was slashed to 12:00. EGAD! The run felt wonderful.... but
>I was crushed to find out how slow I should be :)

Max HR is not easy to estimate properly, and you really can't go by
formulas. Instead of using some formula for % of estimated HR, I would
suggest simply keep running as you were before, and record your average HR
for each run (if your HRM gives the average for the whole run, not just
final HR). Then over time you can see how different HRs affect your
recovery and eventually you can test your Max HR directly, or learn about
the so called "lactate threshold" (LT) heart rate and what that means for
different kinds of training runs. While I'm learning that LT is more a
region of effort than a single HR level, it is still much more important
than Max HR for training. I don't think I've reached my Max HR more than
twice in the last 5 years, but I've come to know my LT area and I try to set
up my training based on this. HR is just biofeedback and it tells you the
state of your heart's effort based on alot of things, not just running
effort; forget the formulas and just watch it for a while to get a feel for
what its telling you.

- Tony
>
>If I were estimating my marathon pace keeping my HR at 70%, (not adjusting
>for cardiac creep), I run a 12 minute mile for the marathon?
>
>Any thoughts?
>
>Thanks!
>
>




29 Jun 2004 06:56:19
rick++
Re: Using HR to pace my first running marathon

These gizmos are a waste of effort for a first marathon.
Just get your weekly base and long runs up there.