30 Jul 2004 16:22:34
Mel Rimmer
Newbie's Log 30/07/04

Last week I ran 30 minutes without stopping for the first time, and this
week the goal was to consolidate that by repeating it a few times. One
thing I've found about running 30 minutes non-stop - it can get boring.
But I was only bored for about 5 seconds until it occurred to me that I
am now capable of running long enough to get bored of it. After that I
was really pleased with myself and not bored anymore. The next day I
took a different route - the hilly route. That wasn't boring at all.
Tough, exhilarating, knackering, but not boring.

I'm also running faster, more like 11-minute-mile pace rather than 12.
It's still slow by anyone's standards, but I haven't been trying to
speed up, so it's nice that it happened all by itself.

Saturday - 20 minutes
Sunday - 30 minutes
Monday - 25 minutes
Tuesday - 30 minutes
Wednesday - 30 minutes
Thursday - 30 minutes
--
Mel Rimmer


30 Jul 2004 16:38:42
Phil M.
Re: Newbie's Log 30/07/04

Mel Rimmer <mel.rimmer@timelord.org.uk > wrote:

> Last week I ran 30 minutes without stopping for the first time, and
this
> week the goal was to consolidate that by repeating it a few times. One
> thing I've found about running 30 minutes non-stop - it can get boring.

A few things to ease or eliminate the boring aspect of long distance
running.

1. Vary the route - don't run the same route every day. Run on a trail or
park. You might have to drive somewhere to find some good running routes.

2. Vary your training. If you're ready for it, do ocassional interval
training or fartlek. Do a google search. You'll find more than enough
info there.

3. Register for a race - This will help to motivate you and give purpose
to your daily training.

4. Bring a friend (human) - preferably someone that runs at your pace.

5. Bring a friend (canine) - preferably a dog that has no trouble staying
with you at your pace. You can buy a leash that attaches to your waste
and has elastic in the middle.

6. Zone out - I find that this just happens to me when I'm on a long/easy
run. It's hard to explain, but it's almost like you are not in your own
body, you are looking at yourself from the outside.

7. Focus on your form - think about relaxing your hands, arms, shoulders,
neck, and facial muscles.

8. Buy some new running toys - if you're a techno-geek, there are many
gadgets/gizmos you can buy that will make your running more interesting.
These include heart rate monitor, GPS device, MP3 player, hydration pack.

9. Buy some new running clothing - Not sure why, but it works for me.

Anyway, TTFN, YMMV, IMO, IIRC, PPPoE.

Phil M.

--
If you can empty your own boat
Crossing the river of the world,
No one will oppose you,
No one will seek to harm you. -Chuang Tzu


31 Jul 2004 15:39:09
Linda and Pete
Re: Newbie's Log 30/07/04

I agree with the gadget part - check Ebay and get an MP3 player and then
vary your music - I hate running without music and LOVE it with - can do
much more - just load it with whatever you want - Linda
"Phil M." <pmarg@charter.net > wrote in message
news:Xns953680A3BA48Fseilogramp@216.77.188.18...
> Mel Rimmer <mel.rimmer@timelord.org.uk> wrote:
>
> > Last week I ran 30 minutes without stopping for the first time, and
> this
> > week the goal was to consolidate that by repeating it a few times. One
> > thing I've found about running 30 minutes non-stop - it can get boring.
>
> A few things to ease or eliminate the boring aspect of long distance
> running.
>
> 1. Vary the route - don't run the same route every day. Run on a trail or
> park. You might have to drive somewhere to find some good running routes.
>
> 2. Vary your training. If you're ready for it, do ocassional interval
> training or fartlek. Do a google search. You'll find more than enough
> info there.
>
> 3. Register for a race - This will help to motivate you and give purpose
> to your daily training.
>
> 4. Bring a friend (human) - preferably someone that runs at your pace.
>
> 5. Bring a friend (canine) - preferably a dog that has no trouble staying
> with you at your pace. You can buy a leash that attaches to your waste
> and has elastic in the middle.
>
> 6. Zone out - I find that this just happens to me when I'm on a long/easy
> run. It's hard to explain, but it's almost like you are not in your own
> body, you are looking at yourself from the outside.
>
> 7. Focus on your form - think about relaxing your hands, arms, shoulders,
> neck, and facial muscles.
>
> 8. Buy some new running toys - if you're a techno-geek, there are many
> gadgets/gizmos you can buy that will make your running more interesting.
> These include heart rate monitor, GPS device, MP3 player, hydration pack.
>
> 9. Buy some new running clothing - Not sure why, but it works for me.
>
> Anyway, TTFN, YMMV, IMO, IIRC, PPPoE.
>
> Phil M.
>
> --
> If you can empty your own boat
> Crossing the river of the world,
> No one will oppose you,
> No one will seek to harm you. -Chuang Tzu




01 Aug 2004 08:43:00
Mel Rimmer
Re: Newbie's Log 30/07/04

In article <a5SdnfwvTaDDaJbcRVn-iw@comcast.com >, Linda and Pete
<abbeyainsley@comcast.net > writes
>I agree with the gadget part - check Ebay and get an MP3 player and then
>vary your music - I hate running without music and LOVE it with - can do
>much more - just load it with whatever you want - Linda

Thing is, I run on country lanes with some traffic but no pavement
(sidewalk). I need to be aware of the sound of traffic. I do play music
in my head - there are some albums I've listened to so often I've
inadvertently memorised not only the vocal part but all the
accompaniment as well and I can play them back at will. I also have
memorised many of my favourite poems and have a whole poetry book in my
head which I can pull out in boring moments. It has saved many a train
journey for me. I never would have guessed that I would use it when
running. Poe's "The Raven" is particularly good, and Eliot's
"Skimbleshanks the Railway Cat".

I'm trying some of the things Phil M. suggested as well, Thanks Phil.
Things like varying the route. I've a plan to combine a run with a
family picnic in a scenic location some day, although the time has never
yet been right. This weekend for example we're without a car. I pulled
the handbrake right off. The weight training is obviously working, but
I'll have to remember to be more gentle with it in future.

I'm also trying to get up the nerve to join a local running club but I
have visions of being laughed at by dozens of elite young men and women
in their 20s who tear off at 4-minute-mile pace and leave me choking in
their dust. Part of me says "Leave it and join a club when you get
faster" but that strikes me as about as sensible as saying "I'll get in
the water after I learn to swim".
--
Mel Rimmer


01 Aug 2004 11:20:29
Phil M.
Re: Newbie's Log 30/07/04

Mel Rimmer <mel.rimmer@timelord.org.uk > wrote:

> In article <a5SdnfwvTaDDaJbcRVn-iw@comcast.com>, Linda and Pete
> <abbeyainsley@comcast.net> writes
>>I agree with the gadget part - check Ebay and get an MP3 player and then
>>vary your music - I hate running without music and LOVE it with - can do
>>much more - just load it with whatever you want - Linda

That can work. However, my problem is that the only song that ever comes
out of my huge database of internal songs is "Silly Loves Songs" by Paul
McArtney. Nooooo!!!!!

> I'm trying some of the things Phil M. suggested as well, Thanks Phil.
> Things like varying the route. I've a plan to combine a run with a
> family picnic in a scenic location some day, although the time
> has never yet been right.

That's the problem. Distance running is a very selfish hobby. It can appear
even more so when family members have to alter their schedule just to be
with you.

Phil M.


01 Aug 2004 16:36:56
Linda and Pete
Re: Newbie's Log 30/07/04

Hey Mel - I do think you'd still hear the traffic - you can set the player
fairly low - just a thought as I too have to do some road runs as well. By
the way, you are doing great - I've been running consistently since Jan and
am, at best, an overall 10 min mile. I used to be faster but I suppose need
more time - just had a baby 10 months ago. And of course, I'm now a year
old - 38. Keep up the great work and there are serious ones in this
group - noticed a lot of idiot postings but there are "real" people too. -
Linda

"Mel Rimmer" <mel.rimmer@timelord.org.uk > wrote in message
news:CZvEEeAE8JDBJwug@dsl.pipex.com...
> In article <a5SdnfwvTaDDaJbcRVn-iw@comcast.com>, Linda and Pete
> <abbeyainsley@comcast.net> writes
> >I agree with the gadget part - check Ebay and get an MP3 player and then
> >vary your music - I hate running without music and LOVE it with - can do
> >much more - just load it with whatever you want - Linda
>
> Thing is, I run on country lanes with some traffic but no pavement
> (sidewalk). I need to be aware of the sound of traffic. I do play music
> in my head - there are some albums I've listened to so often I've
> inadvertently memorised not only the vocal part but all the
> accompaniment as well and I can play them back at will. I also have
> memorised many of my favourite poems and have a whole poetry book in my
> head which I can pull out in boring moments. It has saved many a train
> journey for me. I never would have guessed that I would use it when
> running. Poe's "The Raven" is particularly good, and Eliot's
> "Skimbleshanks the Railway Cat".
>
> I'm trying some of the things Phil M. suggested as well, Thanks Phil.
> Things like varying the route. I've a plan to combine a run with a
> family picnic in a scenic location some day, although the time has never
> yet been right. This weekend for example we're without a car. I pulled
> the handbrake right off. The weight training is obviously working, but
> I'll have to remember to be more gentle with it in future.
>
> I'm also trying to get up the nerve to join a local running club but I
> have visions of being laughed at by dozens of elite young men and women
> in their 20s who tear off at 4-minute-mile pace and leave me choking in
> their dust. Part of me says "Leave it and join a club when you get
> faster" but that strikes me as about as sensible as saying "I'll get in
> the water after I learn to swim".
> --
> Mel Rimmer




01 Aug 2004 21:24:45
Dot
Re: Newbie's Log 30/07/04

Mel Rimmer wrote:
>
> I'm trying some of the things Phil M. suggested as well, Thanks Phil.
> Things like varying the route. I've a plan to combine a run with a
> family picnic in a scenic location some day, although the time has never
> yet been right.

You might add trail runs in there also if you have the opportunity. I've
found two different ways to relax when I run. When I used to run the
local bike path (same basic route about 3x /week for years), I used to
just zone out. On trails, I'm usually completely focused on effort,
footing, scenery, wildlife, etc. - absolutely no room in my brain for
boredom or stressed-out thoughts about work.

>
> I'm also trying to get up the nerve to join a local running club but I
> have visions of being laughed at by dozens of elite young men and women
> in their 20s who tear off at 4-minute-mile pace and leave me choking in
> their dust. Part of me says "Leave it and join a club when you get
> faster" but that strikes me as about as sensible as saying "I'll get in
> the water after I learn to swim".

Clubs can be helpful, but check and see how they do their training. Some
clubs might be one size fits all while others divide the group up by
ability. Being with faster folks can help you improve speed, but it can
also lead you to doing too much too soon and result in injury. Many
times beginners have trouble knowing when to back off.

Dot





01 Aug 2004 22:34:53
Mel Rimmer
Re: Newbie's Log 30/07/04

In article <xcdPc.163120$OB3.113630@bgtnsc05-news.ops.worldnet.att.net >,
Dot <dot.h@#duh?att.net > writes
>
>You might add trail runs in there also if you have the opportunity. I've
>found two different ways to relax when I run. When I used to run the
>local bike path (same basic route about 3x /week for years), I used to
>just zone out. On trails, I'm usually completely focused on effort,
>footing, scenery, wildlife, etc. - absolutely no room in my brain for
>boredom or stressed-out thoughts about work.

I ran off-road today and it was fantastic. Started out (after I got off
the road) running a beaten path alongside a wheatfield. Then under the
cover of a coppice (and through a huge patch of black-and-white fur
where two badgers obviously had a hell of a rumble last night). Then a
short steep downhill mudbath, before coming out onto a barely-visible
trail alongside of a cowfield next to a river. I always love walking
along there but running it was a thrill, especially early on a beautiful
Sunday morning.

But my legs are shredded by brambles and stinging nettles. Must remember
to wear long pants next time I run that route.

>Clubs can be helpful, but check and see how they do their training. Some
>clubs might be one size fits all while others divide the group up by
>ability. Being with faster folks can help you improve speed, but it can
>also lead you to doing too much too soon and result in injury. Many
>times beginners have trouble knowing when to back off.

I've just lately read a great tip which says to do a few races and see
which local clubs are friendly and sociable. The writer says he was in a
club where they were all serious and competitive, until at a race he
noticed another club who were all chatting and laughing and having a
great time. He immediately decided to quit and join /that/ club.
--
Mel Rimmer


01 Aug 2004 21:53:32
Dot
Re: Newbie's Log 30/07/04

Mel Rimmer wrote:

> I ran off-road today and it was fantastic. Started out (after I got off
> the road) running a beaten path alongside a wheatfield. Then under the
> cover of a coppice (and through a huge patch of black-and-white fur
> where two badgers obviously had a hell of a rumble last night). Then a
> short steep downhill mudbath, before coming out onto a barely-visible
> trail alongside of a cowfield next to a river. I always love walking
> along there but running it was a thrill, especially early on a beautiful
> Sunday morning.

Welcome to trail running.

>
> But my legs are shredded by brambles and stinging nettles. Must remember
> to wear long pants next time I run that route.

Welcome to trail running ;) You'll get used to it, at least the
brambles. We've got stinging nettles, but somehow I've managed to avoid
them, but not sure how.

>
> I've just lately read a great tip which says to do a few races and see
> which local clubs are friendly and sociable. The writer says he was in a
> club where they were all serious and competitive, until at a race he
> noticed another club who were all chatting and laughing and having a
> great time. He immediately decided to quit and join /that/ club.

That's a really good idea.

Good luck.

Dot




02 Aug 2004 12:05:17
np426z
Re: Newbie's Log 30/07/04

"Linda and Pete" <abbeyainsley@comcast.net > wrote in message
news:_cOdndtST67zyZDcRVn-gg@comcast.com...

> Keep up the great work and there are serious ones in this
> group - noticed a lot of idiot postings but there are "real" people
oo. -

I manage the dichotomy of being an 'idiot' and a 'real person' quite well,
thank you. Whether advice is presented in a manner you find distateful or
whether it's wrapped in words of gold is of little consequence. What
matters is the quality of the advice. Frankly, I see the 'idiots' having
the edge over the 'serious' posters, though naturally I'm biased :-)




02 Aug 2004 11:06:34
SPQR
Re: Newbie's Log 30/07/04

Mel Rimmer <mel.rimmer@timelord.org.uk > wrote in message news:<nWx9nBA6emCBJwSw@dsl.pipex.com>...
> Last week I ran 30 minutes without stopping for the first time, and this
> week the goal was to consolidate that by repeating it a few times. One
> thing I've found about running 30 minutes non-stop - it can get boring.
> But I was only bored for about 5 seconds until it occurred to me that I
> am now capable of running long enough to get bored of it. After that I
> was really pleased with myself and not bored anymore. The next day I
> took a different route - the hilly route. That wasn't boring at all.
> Tough, exhilarating, knackering, but not boring.
>
> I'm also running faster, more like 11-minute-mile pace rather than 12.
> It's still slow by anyone's standards, but I haven't been trying to
> speed up, so it's nice that it happened all by itself.
>
> Saturday - 20 minutes
> Sunday - 30 minutes
> Monday - 25 minutes
> Tuesday - 30 minutes
> Wednesday - 30 minutes
> Thursday - 30 minutes


Make a 10-minute videotape of a George W. Bush speech. Watch it
before running -- you'll be so pissed off you'll run an hour or more
before you know it.