30 Jun 2005 12:33:35
Jay Hennigan
Dizzy feeling after hard race.

I've been orienteering for a couple of years and have recently been
compeeting in local road races, mostly 5K and 10K. Longest race I've done
is a half-marathon. Typically run 20 to 25 miles per week on a mixture of
trails and roads for training.

I have noticed that after a hard race with a kick at the finish, if I stop
moving I get lightheaded almost like I've been breathing into a paper bag,
and need to lie down to recover. But, if I keep walking around for a
few minutes this doesn't happen. Is this a typical reaction to a hard run?


30 Jun 2005 12:35:57
Re: Dizzy feeling after hard race.

> Is this a typical reaction to a hard run?>

Yes, if you have a brain tumor, and you do.



30 Jun 2005 20:28:13
Donovan Rebbechi
Re: Dizzy feeling after hard race.

On 2005-06-30, Jay Hennigan <jay@west.net > wrote:
> I've been orienteering for a couple of years and have recently been
> compeeting in local road races, mostly 5K and 10K. Longest race I've done
> is a half-marathon. Typically run 20 to 25 miles per week on a mixture of
> trails and roads for training.
>
> I have noticed that after a hard race with a kick at the finish, if I stop
> moving I get lightheaded almost like I've been breathing into a paper bag,
> and need to lie down to recover. But, if I keep walking around for a
> few minutes this doesn't happen. Is this a typical reaction to a hard run?

I was going to post, but wasn't sure if my memory was correct. It's due to
a blood pressure drop. Read this:

http://www.goaskalice.columbia.edu/2598.html

Cheers,
--
Donovan Rebbechi
http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/


01 Jul 2005 15:36:51
DadatHome
Re: Dizzy feeling after hard race.

In article <slrndc8let.9op.abuse@panix2.panix.com >,
Donovan Rebbechi <abuse@aol.com > wrote:

> I was going to post, but wasn't sure if my memory was correct. It's due to
> a blood pressure drop

That's what I was thinking - could be from mild dehydration. Or... The
legs, as I recall, aid in circulatory pumping during exertion* - if one
is doing an activity that requires high blood circulation like running
and then you suddenly cease, I think one's pressure would drop until
either the heart picked up the total needs or the body's need for high
recirculation diminished.

* This lower body aid in blood circulation, I believe, is one of the
theories on why people suffer more heart attacks doing things like
shoveling snow. The exertion rate is high; the arms and chest do little
to aid in circulation so the cardiovascular system is taxed to the
failure point. When the lower body is doing the majority of the
exertion, it aids in circulation so lessens the demand on the heart to
keep up.