27 Apr 2006 18:38:43
Question about caring for hardwood weapons

Have some hardwood Filipino sticks(epee, kamagong) and some are drying
out. Friend recommended using Mineral oil on them and then sealing
them with wax( I forget what kind...)

Anyone have any recommendations/advice? And also how to apply them.

TIA,

Mike



27 Apr 2006 19:11:54
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons


mikejc563@yahoo.com wrote:
> Have some hardwood Filipino sticks(epee, kamagong) and some are drying
> out. Friend recommended using Mineral oil on them and then sealing
> them with wax( I forget what kind...)
>
> Anyone have any recommendations/advice? And also how to apply them.
>
> TIA,
>
> Mike

skip the mineral oil and just use a little butchers wax.

carl



27 Apr 2006 19:57:55
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On 27 Apr 2006 18:38:43 -0700, mikejc563@yahoo.com wrote:

>Have some hardwood Filipino sticks(epee, kamagong) and some are drying
>out. Friend recommended using Mineral oil on them and then sealing
>them with wax( I forget what kind...)
>
>Anyone have any recommendations/advice? And also how to apply them.

linseed oil

hand rub it in. let sit a few minutes, wipe off excess. repeat every
24 hours as necessary

Hal

>
>TIA,
>
>Mike
--
NewsGuy.Com 30Gb $9.95 Carry Forward and On Demand Bandwidth


28 Apr 2006 06:50:13
Chas
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

<mikejc563@yahoo.com > wrote
>.....Friend recommended using Mineral oil on them and then sealing
> them with wax( I forget what kind...)

Don't use mineral oil- it stays 'wet', and isn't compatible with wood.
Drying oils like linseed/tung are better for wood, but they leave a surface
that engenders blisters. Never use linseed on a work handle.
Don't use animal fats either.
Melt in good beeswax (not paraffin) with a hot gun- take a polished steel
rod and rub/burnish the wax in until you're satisfied. It gives a smooth
surface that won't splinter as easily, and the wax aids in holding the
stick. It gets kinda tacky with hand-warmth and yet doesn't stick to you
like the linseed oil finish will.

Chas




28 Apr 2006 21:40:11
Fraser Johnston
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons


"Chas" <chasclements@comcast.net > wrote in message
news:QemdnaAKGaKKks_ZRVn-vg@comcast.com...
> <mikejc563@yahoo.com> wrote
>>.....Friend recommended using Mineral oil on them and then sealing
>> them with wax( I forget what kind...)
>
> Don't use mineral oil- it stays 'wet', and isn't compatible with wood.
> Drying oils like linseed/tung are better for wood, but they leave a
> surface that engenders blisters. Never use linseed on a work handle.
> Don't use animal fats either.
> Melt in good beeswax (not paraffin) with a hot gun- take a polished steel
> rod and rub/burnish the wax in until you're satisfied. It gives a smooth
> surface that won't splinter as easily, and the wax aids in holding the
> stick. It gets kinda tacky with hand-warmth and yet doesn't stick to you
> like the linseed oil finish will.

I'm having rec.knive deja-vu Chas.

Fraser




28 Apr 2006 07:59:52
Chas
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

"Fraser Johnston" <fraser@jcis.com.au > wrote
> I'm having rec.knive deja-vu Chas.

It's 'tool-handle' specific, so applies to all sorts of implements.
I maintain dozens of edges and handles in my work- make a lot of handles for
working tools and weapons.
And the information is not unique to me- I think I learned about linseed
from Eric Sloane's books on antique tools/wood/woodworking years ago.
Linseed/Tung type drying oils are great for certain things- gunstocks are a
good example. You don't handle a gunstock like you do an ax haft. The
stabilization of the gunstock wood is the desired attribute- not it's
'hand'.

Chas




28 Apr 2006 08:43:00
Neil Gendzwill
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

Chas wrote:
>
> It's 'tool-handle' specific, so applies to all sorts of implements.
> I maintain dozens of edges and handles in my work- make a lot of handles for
> working tools and weapons.
> And the information is not unique to me- I think I learned about linseed
> from Eric Sloane's books on antique tools/wood/woodworking years ago.
> Linseed/Tung type drying oils are great for certain things- gunstocks are a
> good example. You don't handle a gunstock like you do an ax haft. The
> stabilization of the gunstock wood is the desired attribute- not it's
> 'hand'.

A good lemon oil like Circa 1854 works well for wooden weapons.

Neil


28 Apr 2006 09:02:42
Chas
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

"Neil Gendzwill" <ngendzwill@yahoo.com > wrote
> A good lemon oil like Circa 1854 works well for wooden weapons.

Yes- although it tends to exfoliate/solve any wax on the piece.
Truth be told, I also like 'Liquid Gold'- heresy, I know.

Chas




28 Apr 2006 08:33:37
Shuurai
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons


Chas wrote:
> <mikejc563@yahoo.com> wrote
> >.....Friend recommended using Mineral oil on them and then sealing
> > them with wax( I forget what kind...)
>
> Don't use mineral oil- it stays 'wet', and isn't compatible with wood.
> Drying oils like linseed/tung are better for wood, but they leave a surface
> that engenders blisters. Never use linseed on a work handle.
> Don't use animal fats either.

A lot of it depends on how you're using the weapon, too. A lot of bo,
jo, and bokken users actually like that little bit of 'stick' (no pun
intended) that oil treatment provides. But for shortstick, you are be
better off with the wax.

Never cared for linseed oil because it tends to smell, and will yellow
the wood.

I've always liked lemon oil for my bo - apply with a cloth, sand with
extremely fine paper, apply again, sand again.. repeat until you like
the results.



02 May 2006 10:03:31
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Fri, 28 Apr 2006 06:50:13 -0600, "Chas" <chasclements@comcast.net >
wrote:

><mikejc563@yahoo.com> wrote
>>.....Friend recommended using Mineral oil on them and then sealing
>> them with wax( I forget what kind...)
>
>Don't use mineral oil- it stays 'wet', and isn't compatible with wood.
>Drying oils like linseed/tung are better for wood, but they leave a surface
>that engenders blisters. Never use linseed on a work handle.
>Don't use animal fats either.
>Melt in good beeswax (not paraffin) with a hot gun- take a polished steel
>rod and rub/burnish the wax in until you're satisfied. It gives a smooth
>surface that won't splinter as easily, and the wax aids in holding the
>stick. It gets kinda tacky with hand-warmth and yet doesn't stick to you
>like the linseed oil finish will.

You don't leave a film layer of linseed oil on the wood. The linseed
is a penetrating oil to seal the pores and cracks in the wood. After
drying time you buff the surface film off with 0000 steel wool to
polish the surface down to the natural wood.

Linseed oil is the masters wood finishing. Anything else is a
knockoff.


Hal

>
>Chas
>
--
NewsGuy.Com 30Gb $9.95 Carry Forward and On Demand Bandwidth


02 May 2006 10:09:30
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Fri, 28 Apr 2006 09:02:42 -0600, "Chas" <chasclements@comcast.net >
wrote:

>"Neil Gendzwill" <ngendzwill@yahoo.com> wrote
>> A good lemon oil like Circa 1854 works well for wooden weapons.
>
>Yes- although it tends to exfoliate/solve any wax on the piece.
>Truth be told, I also like 'Liquid Gold'- heresy, I know.

OMG.

and here, all this time, I was sure the Grandmaster Chas would be a
linseed man...

again, the secret to linseed is you don't leave a coating film.
Linseed is only to seal the pores and cracks in the wood. Buff it
down after drying between coats (the more the better) and after the
last coat to have nothing between your hand and the wood. The linseed
is only to penetrate and seal the pores and prevent cracking. With
new wood, several coats are minimum. To preserve on the long term,
monthly applications are preferred. A lot of work, yes, but you make
it a Zen like process, and you will become one with the wood. And
your wood will last your lifetime, plus many more.

Hal

>
>Chas
>
--
NewsGuy.Com 30Gb $9.95 Carry Forward and On Demand Bandwidth


02 May 2006 16:43:55
Rabid Weasel
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Thu, 27 Apr 2006 18:38:43 -0700, mikejc563 wrote:

> Have some hardwood Filipino sticks(epee, kamagong) and some are drying
> out. Friend recommended using Mineral oil on them and then sealing
> them with wax( I forget what kind...)
>
> Anyone have any recommendations/advice? And also how to apply them.
>
> TIA,
>
> Mike

Well, I've seen a lot of advice go out on this. Let's check with what a
professional woodworker making wooden weapons has to say on the matter of
care:

How do I care for my new waster?

Your waster will be coated with a mixture of Boiled Linseed oil and
paint thinner. This keeps the wood from drying out and becoming
brittle. You should apply a coat of oil monthly for at least 10 months,
then every 4 months thereafter. You can not over-oil them! Let the oil
sit on the wood for 15 minutes then wipe the excess away with a clean
cloth. The oil will provide superior protection to the wood and extend
its useful life. Tung oil can also be used with much the same results
and give a shiner finish. Its just a little more expensive.

A light sanding with the 220 grit sandpaper can also be used to removed
dirt and grime that builds up on the handle area.

Caution: Please be careful with Linseed oil, since wet rags can
spontaneously ignite, so follow all safety precautions. We have seen
it happen, so please be careful.

Regularly check your waster for any splinters that may appear. These
should be sanded out with 120 grit sandpaper and then smoothed over
with 220 grit. Re-oil the spot as required.

Do NOT leave your waster in direct sun, heat, or water. This include
leaving them in your car. This will cause the blade to warp and will
not be covered by our warrantee.

Do NOT use wasters against steel weapons or steel armour. Wasters
hitting a round surface is typically OK, but any sharp edges such as on
a rim of a helm will gouge the wood if their is sufficient force. This
is also not covered by our warrantee.

Do NOT use beeswax on your wasters, this makes the weapons look pretty,
but does not penetrate and preserve the core of the wood. Some beeswax
applied in the handle area to keep the dirt away is OK, but not on the
blade section.

Do NOT neglect oiling your sword. The wood moisture content in the
wood will change just like your skin. A dry air conditioned house to a
humid workout room will cause the wood to warp. Oiling can prevent
this. Also without oil, the wood will dry out and splinter with
contact. This is not covered by our warrantee.

With proper care and maintenance your waster should last many years to
come.

http://woodenswords.com/faq.htm#How%20do%20I%20care%20for%20my%20new%20waster?

Peace favor your sword (IH),
Kirk


02 May 2006 16:45:49
Rabid Weasel
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Tue, 02 May 2006 10:09:30 -0600, hal wrote:

> On Fri, 28 Apr 2006 09:02:42 -0600, "Chas" <chasclements@comcast.net>
> wrote:
>
>>"Neil Gendzwill" <ngendzwill@yahoo.com> wrote
>>> A good lemon oil like Circa 1854 works well for wooden weapons.
>>
>>Yes- although it tends to exfoliate/solve any wax on the piece.
>>Truth be told, I also like 'Liquid Gold'- heresy, I know.
>
> OMG.
>
> and here, all this time, I was sure the Grandmaster Chas would be a
> linseed man...
>
> again, the secret to linseed is you don't leave a coating film.
> Linseed is only to seal the pores and cracks in the wood. Buff it
> down after drying between coats (the more the better) and after the
> last coat to have nothing between your hand and the wood. The linseed
> is only to penetrate and seal the pores and prevent cracking. With
> new wood, several coats are minimum. To preserve on the long term,
> monthly applications are preferred. A lot of work, yes, but you make
> it a Zen like process, and you will become one with the wood. And
> your wood will last your lifetime, plus many more.
>
> Hal

Linseed also serves to moisturize the wood.

(IH)


02 May 2006 10:41:26
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On 28 Apr 2006 08:33:37 -0700, "Shuurai" <Shuurai11@hotmail.com >
wrote:

>
>Chas wrote:
>> <mikejc563@yahoo.com> wrote
>> >.....Friend recommended using Mineral oil on them and then sealing
>> > them with wax( I forget what kind...)
>>
>> Don't use mineral oil- it stays 'wet', and isn't compatible with wood.
>> Drying oils like linseed/tung are better for wood, but they leave a surface
>> that engenders blisters. Never use linseed on a work handle.
>> Don't use animal fats either.
>
>A lot of it depends on how you're using the weapon, too. A lot of bo,
>jo, and bokken users actually like that little bit of 'stick' (no pun
>intended) that oil treatment provides. But for shortstick, you are be
>better off with the wax.
>
>Never cared for linseed oil because it tends to smell, and will yellow
>the wood.

Only because you don't know how to properly use linseed oil.

Hal

>
>I've always liked lemon oil for my bo - apply with a cloth, sand with
>extremely fine paper, apply again, sand again.. repeat until you like
>the results.
--
NewsGuy.Com 30Gb $9.95 Carry Forward and On Demand Bandwidth


02 May 2006 17:20:53
Rabid Weasel
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Tue, 02 May 2006 10:41:26 -0600, hal wrote:

> On 28 Apr 2006 08:33:37 -0700, "Shuurai" <Shuurai11@hotmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>>
>>Chas wrote:
>>> <mikejc563@yahoo.com> wrote
>>> >.....Friend recommended using Mineral oil on them and then sealing
>>> > them with wax( I forget what kind...)
>>>
>>> Don't use mineral oil- it stays 'wet', and isn't compatible with wood.
>>> Drying oils like linseed/tung are better for wood, but they leave a surface
>>> that engenders blisters. Never use linseed on a work handle.
>>> Don't use animal fats either.
>>
>>A lot of it depends on how you're using the weapon, too. A lot of bo,
>>jo, and bokken users actually like that little bit of 'stick' (no pun
>>intended) that oil treatment provides. But for shortstick, you are be
>>better off with the wax.
>>
>>Never cared for linseed oil because it tends to smell, and will yellow
>>the wood.
>
> Only because you don't know how to properly use linseed oil.
>
> Hal

No. Linseed *will* yellow the wood over time. And, as it (ever so
slowly) dries it will give an odor that some people can smell.
Personally, it never bothered me any, but it's there nonetheless.

(IH)


02 May 2006 13:17:23
Chas
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

<hal@nospam.com > wrote
> You don't leave a film layer of linseed oil on the wood. The linseed
> is a penetrating oil to seal the pores and cracks in the wood. After
> drying time you buff the surface film off with 0000 steel wool to
> polish the surface down to the natural wood.

Linseed isn't a penetrating oil- it just happens to sink into pores and
cracks. It's actually a very non-penetrating drying oil that sits on the
surface of the material, howver varigated that might be.
The only reason to 'polish the surface down' is so a wax or nut oil will
apply well.
You're better off mixing rottenstone/pumice into your linseed oil for the
first half-dozen applications, so it fills quickly. It's kinda like
spit-shining shoes. After you get a good preparatory surface, switch to
another finish.

> Linseed oil is the masters wood finishing. Anything else is a
> knockoff.

Nah- linseed's always been the cheapest drying oil available, and one of the
coarsest. Tung-nut oil has always been preferred, it's only in the last few
decades that it's been more available to the hobbyist. Appleseed oil is
another, as is walnut-
never use a mineral oil or an animal fat.

Chas




02 May 2006 13:30:01
Chas
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

"Rabid Weasel" <lawson@NO29405SPAM+dayton.net > wrote
>> and here, all this time, I was sure the Grandmaster Chas would be a
>> linseed man...
> Linseed also serves to moisturize the wood.

It's a drying oil, not a wetting oil. It hardens to a waterproof 'veneer'
finish.
It seals wood against moisture; not adds to it.
That's why they slather it on the barn by the gallon; that's why they seal
gunstocks with it; use it as the base for paint, the treatment for marine
woodwork and so on.
Linseed oil has some really good uses- I still work with it a lot, both raw
and boiled. It does what it does.

Chas




02 May 2006 19:43:16
Rabid Weasel
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Tue, 02 May 2006 13:30:01 -0600, Chas wrote:

> "Rabid Weasel" <lawson@NO29405SPAM+dayton.net> wrote
>>> and here, all this time, I was sure the Grandmaster Chas would be a
>>> linseed man...
>> Linseed also serves to moisturize the wood.
>
> It's a drying oil, not a wetting oil. It hardens to a waterproof 'veneer'
> finish.
> It seals wood against moisture; not adds to it.
> That's why they slather it on the barn by the gallon; that's why they seal
> gunstocks with it; use it as the base for paint, the treatment for marine
> woodwork and so on.
> Linseed oil has some really good uses- I still work with it a lot, both raw
> and boiled. It does what it does.
>
> Chas

It takes an small eternity for raw linseed to harden. Until that time it
soaks into the wood grain. When it finally does harden you get linoleum.
When I use linseed oil, I use almost exclusively boiled. Sometimes I'll
thin it so that it'll soak better.

In general, I don't use it that much any more. It works great on bare
wood but I've been doing a lot of 'bark-on' wood and poly works much
better on that, imo.

As for animal fats, a traditional drying method used by the Irish was to
slather *butter* all over the stick and jam it up the chimney.

'Course they also would bury the stick in a dung-heap too. :P

Peace favor your sword (IH),
Kirk


02 May 2006 15:41:08
Badger North
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Tue, 2 May 2006 13:17:23 -0600, "Chas" <chasclements@comcast.net >
wrote:

>Linseed isn't a penetrating oil- it just happens to sink into pores and
>cracks. It's actually a very non-penetrating drying oil that sits on the
>surface of the material, howver varigated that might be.

When I was a kid, someone mentioned 'french polish' to me, which was a
mixture of linseed oil and shellac. Does anybody still do this? Do
they actually still use shellac or is it all polyurethane?

Badger Jones
www.youngforest.ca
"Every fighter's got a plan until they get hit in the mouth." - Mike Tyson


02 May 2006 20:14:30
Rabid Weasel
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Tue, 02 May 2006 15:41:08 -0400, Badger North wrote:

> On Tue, 2 May 2006 13:17:23 -0600, "Chas" <chasclements@comcast.net>
> wrote:
>
>>Linseed isn't a penetrating oil- it just happens to sink into pores and
>>cracks. It's actually a very non-penetrating drying oil that sits on the
>>surface of the material, howver varigated that might be.
>
> When I was a kid, someone mentioned 'french polish' to me, which was a
> mixture of linseed oil and shellac. Does anybody still do this? Do
> they actually still use shellac or is it all polyurethane?

You can still find shellac at the home-improvement/hobby stores. I never
use the stuff though. Poly is simply much, much better. :-)

Peace favor your sword (IH),
Kirk


02 May 2006 14:58:54
Chas
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

"Rabid Weasel" <lawson@NO29405SPAM+dayton.net > wrote
> It takes an small eternity for raw linseed to harden. Until that time it
> soaks into the wood grain.

yeah- it's also a traditional treatment for leather. I use it in museum
restorations and replacement parts.

> When it finally does harden you get linoleum.

Yeah- they used it on felt as well. The old miner's hats were felt hardened
by linseed. 'Oilskin' was canvas treated with linseed.

> When I use linseed oil, I use almost exclusively boiled. Sometimes I'll
> thin it so that it'll soak better.

Yeah- like I said; try turps as a thinner. In a small application, it's much
cleaner and volatilizes quicker than paint thinner.

> In general, I don't use it that much any more. It works great on bare
> wood but I've been doing a lot of 'bark-on' wood and poly works much
> better on that, imo.

Tried PEG?
It really does soak into the wood- you can even treat green wood with it and
minimize checking and warping. It doesn't have the surface coating like poly
or spar varnish.

> As for animal fats, a traditional drying method used by the Irish was to
> slather *butter* all over the stick and jam it up the chimney.

the kiln action of the chimney cooked out the animal fats-
you also hear of people soaking a stick in a bath of 30w crankcase oil-
doesn't mean it's a good idea.

> 'Course they also would bury the stick in a dung-heap too. :P

The decomposing dung produced heat that drove off the moisture slowly enough
to minimize checking and warping.
You can bury it in mud too- anything that slows down the exchange of
moisture between the wood and the ambient environment.
I just seal the ends with wax/paraffin and keep it in the studio for a few
years.

Chas




02 May 2006 15:01:21
Chas
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

"Badger North" <young_forest@REEEMOVEhotmail.com > wrote
> When I was a kid, someone mentioned 'french polish' to me, which was a
> mixture of linseed oil and shellac. Does anybody still do this?

English Best quality firearms are finished with French Polish; some musical
instruments.
It's not just the material, it's the method of application- it's a
'built-up' finish like spitshining boots.

Chas




02 May 2006 15:03:51
Chas
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

"Rabid Weasel" <lawson@NO29405SPAM+dayton.net > wrote
> You can still find shellac at the home-improvement/hobby stores. I never
> use the stuff though. Poly is simply much, much better. :-)

Poly is very soft in comparison to shellac- that's why shellac is used on
sounding boards for musical instruments; clarity of tone from the hard
finish.
Shellac is vulnerable to water- that's the white rings you see on good
coffee tables.

Chas




02 May 2006 21:13:32
Richard Ward
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

Badger North wrote:
<snip >
> When I was a kid, someone mentioned 'french polish' to me, which was a
> mixture of linseed oil and shellac. Does anybody still do this? Do
> they actually still use shellac or is it all polyurethane?

It's commonly used to refinish antique furniture that would have
originally been finished with a french polished surface. Putting
polyurethane on an old piece of furniture almost totally destroys it's
value. (Refinished furniture with a proper finish also has a greatly
reduced value, but better than a piece with a severely damaged finish.
If the finish is just damaged it doesn't count as patina.) My father's
been dead for about a dozen years, but he made furniture and turned
bowls and boxes as a hobby, and he did some french polishing on the
furniture.

Poyurethane is cheap to put on, incredibly durable, and doesn't require
waxing, but it just doesn't look very nice on furniture.


03 May 2006 12:45:44
Rabid Weasel
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Tue, 02 May 2006 14:58:54 -0600, Chas wrote:

>> When I use linseed oil, I use almost exclusively boiled. Sometimes I'll
>> thin it so that it'll soak better.
>
> Yeah- like I said; try turps as a thinner. In a small application, it's much
> cleaner and volatilizes quicker than paint thinner.

I'll have to remember that for the next time I work on bare wood. I've
got some ash staves I've split out and am slowly shaving down to
singlestick shape with a box plane. But it's dull as heck and I suck at
sharpening plane blades. I broke down and bought on with replaceable
blades that I'll be trying out soon.


>> In general, I don't use it that much any more. It works great on bare
>> wood but I've been doing a lot of 'bark-on' wood and poly works much
>> better on that, imo.
>
> Tried PEG?
> It really does soak into the wood- you can even treat green wood with it and
> minimize checking and warping. It doesn't have the surface coating like poly
> or spar varnish.

No, haven't tried it but I might since you give it a good recommendation.


> I just seal the ends with wax/paraffin and keep it in the studio for a few
> years.

That's what I usually do too. Some woods seem to need more protection
than even that. I've got some recent cut pear that seems to be cracking
at the knob end in spite of being sealed with candle wax. Pisses me off
'cuz they're pretty sticks, by and large.

Peace favor your sword (IH),
Kirk


03 May 2006 12:47:52
Rabid Weasel
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Tue, 02 May 2006 15:03:51 -0600, Chas wrote:

> "Rabid Weasel" <lawson@NO29405SPAM+dayton.net> wrote
>> You can still find shellac at the home-improvement/hobby stores. I never
>> use the stuff though. Poly is simply much, much better. :-)
>
> Poly is very soft in comparison to shellac- that's why shellac is used on
> sounding boards for musical instruments; clarity of tone from the hard
> finish.

After some experimentation I now use "floor grade" or "exterior grade"
poly exclusively over other poly applications. It's much, much more
durable than standard poly.

Peace favor your sword (IH),
Kirk


03 May 2006 09:00:40
Badger North
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Tue, 02 May 2006 19:43:16 GMT, Rabid Weasel
<lawson@NO29405SPAM+dayton.net > wrote:

>It takes an small eternity for raw linseed to harden. Until that time it
>soaks into the wood grain. When it finally does harden you get linoleum.
>When I use linseed oil, I use almost exclusively boiled. Sometimes I'll
>thin it so that it'll soak better.

I'm experimenting with linseed and rattan at the moment. Made a tube
to hold a pair of sticks, put 'em in with the oil, left it for a
couple weeks to soak. Other than having to seal the ends to prevent
oil flying out the ends when you swing, they're great - heavy, hard,
and the skin is lasting very well.

Badger Jones
www.youngforest.ca
"Every fighter's got a plan until they get hit in the mouth." - Mike Tyson


03 May 2006 13:47:33
Rabid Weasel
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Wed, 03 May 2006 09:00:40 -0400, Badger North wrote:

> I'm experimenting with linseed and rattan at the moment. Made a tube
> to hold a pair of sticks, put 'em in with the oil, left it for a
> couple weeks to soak. Other than having to seal the ends to prevent
> oil flying out the ends when you swing, they're great - heavy, hard,
> and the skin is lasting very well.

Boiled or raw?

Peace favor your sword (IH),
Kirk


03 May 2006 10:20:43
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons


Chas wrote:
<snip >
>
> Nah- linseed's always been the cheapest drying oil available, and one of the
> coarsest. Tung-nut oil has always been preferred, it's only in the last few
> decades that it's been more available to the hobbyist. Appleseed oil is
> another, as is walnut-
> never use a mineral oil or an animal fat.
>
> Chas

I've also heard that Tung Oil is poisonous and therefore not good for
wooden weapons. Gets on your hand when you sweat.
Just sayin.

Mike



03 May 2006 11:01:37
Shuurai
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons


> >Never cared for linseed oil because it tends to smell, and will yellow
> >the wood.
>
> Only because you don't know how to properly use linseed oil.

It doesn't matter how you use linseed oil - it smells and it yellows
the wood. If you're using something like white oak, that can be enough
to make it unattractive.

Lemon oil on the other hand smells nice, and doesn't discolor the wood.

I am honored that you've decided to snipe at me like a little bitch. I
was worried you'd let Kirk have all the fun.



03 May 2006 11:19:19
Shuurai
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons


> >Melt in good beeswax (not paraffin) with a hot gun- take a polished steel
> >rod and rub/burnish the wax in until you're satisfied. It gives a smooth
> >surface that won't splinter as easily, and the wax aids in holding the
> >stick. It gets kinda tacky with hand-warmth and yet doesn't stick to you
> >like the linseed oil finish will.
>
> You don't leave a film layer of linseed oil on the wood.

Well, yeah you do actually. You just happen to sand off the part that
hasn't sunk into the cracks.

> The linseed is a penetrating oil to seal the pores and cracks in the wood.

It's a drying oil that covers the surface.

> After drying time you buff the surface film off with 0000 steel wool to
> polish the surface down to the natural wood.

Very good!

> Linseed oil is the masters wood finishing. Anything else is a
> knockoff.

You don't even know what it is and you're declaring yourself a
master... well, at least you're consistent.

Linseed oil is fine for furniture, and with some woods will enhance the
color and make for a nice shine. But most real craftsmen consider it
to be on the lower end in terms of quality.



03 May 2006 18:42:31
Rabid Weasel
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Wed, 03 May 2006 11:01:37 -0700, Shuurai wrote:

>
>> >Never cared for linseed oil because it tends to smell, and will yellow
>> >the wood.
>>
>> Only because you don't know how to properly use linseed oil.
>
> It doesn't matter how you use linseed oil - it smells and it yellows
> the wood. If you're using something like white oak, that can be enough
> to make it unattractive.
>
> Lemon oil on the other hand smells nice, and doesn't discolor the wood.
>
> I am honored that you've decided to snipe at me like a little bitch. I
> was worried you'd let Kirk have all the fun.

He's still trying to look up on line what I meant by not wanting the grain
to "run out."

Peace favor your sword (IH),
Kirk


03 May 2006 12:41:47
Chas
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

"Rabid Weasel" <lawson@NO21061SPAM+dayton.net > wrote
>.....I've
> got some ash staves I've split out and am slowly shaving down to
> singlestick shape with a box plane.

Invest in a spokeshave- or at least a drawknife.

> But it's dull as heck and I suck at
> sharpening plane blades. I broke down and bought on with replaceable
> blades that I'll be trying out soon.

It's not the right tool for what you want to do- a box plane is a 'try
plane', and it's probably not contacting much on your stave.
'Replaceable blades'???????
The reason you sharpen your own blade is to set the proper angle for the
wood you're working. Ash is *hard*, and needs a more obtuse bevel than a
softer wood.

>.....I've got some recent cut pear that seems to be cracking
> at the knob end in spite of being sealed with candle wax.

Yeah; a root-ball may have inclusions of rocks and stuff. At the least, it's
a very burled knot, and the last part of the stave to cure anyway.
I just fill the checks and go on- or keep cutting till the check runs out.

Chas




03 May 2006 18:47:31
Rabid Weasel
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Wed, 03 May 2006 11:19:19 -0700, Shuurai wrote:

> Linseed oil is fine for furniture, and with some woods will enhance the
> color and make for a nice shine. But most real craftsmen consider it
> to be on the lower end in terms of quality.

One of the big things going right now is Brazilian rose-seed oil. Never
worked with the stuff myself so I can't say if it's all hype. Too
expensive for my tastes though. The claim is that it penetrates deeply
and seals.

Peace favor your sword (IH),
Kirk


03 May 2006 12:47:24
Chas
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

<mikejc563@yahoo.com > wrote
> I've also heard that Tung Oil is poisonous and therefore not good for
> wooden weapons. Gets on your hand when you sweat.

Nah- they discourage it for kitchen cutting boards and such, that's all.
It's just fine for handweapons.

Chas




03 May 2006 18:55:12
Rabid Weasel
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Wed, 03 May 2006 12:41:47 -0600, Chas wrote:

> "Rabid Weasel" <lawson@NO21061SPAM+dayton.net> wrote
>>.....I've
>> got some ash staves I've split out and am slowly shaving down to
>> singlestick shape with a box plane.
>
> Invest in a spokeshave- or at least a drawknife.

It's a hobby for me. Too many expensive, specialized tools for me to take
it too seriously.


>> But it's dull as heck and I suck at
>> sharpening plane blades. I broke down and bought on with replaceable
>> blades that I'll be trying out soon.
>
> It's not the right tool for what you want to do- a box plane is a 'try
> plane', and it's probably not contacting much on your stave.
> 'Replaceable blades'???????
> The reason you sharpen your own blade is to set the proper angle for the
> wood you're working. Ash is *hard*, and needs a more obtuse bevel than a
> softer wood.

This goes back to my claim that I'm not particularly good at sharpening
the blade on the box-plane (it sharpens *way* different from a pocket
knife). Honestly, if I knew where a local grind-monkey was I'd take it to
him. Failing that, yeah, I'll buy a "cheaters" box-plane with those cheesy
little replaceable blades.


>>.....I've got some recent cut pear that seems to be cracking
>> at the knob end in spite of being sealed with candle wax.
>
> Yeah; a root-ball may have inclusions of rocks and stuff. At the least, it's
> a very burled knot, and the last part of the stave to cure anyway.

Most of mine are cut from a mother branch at the joint. I take the branch
and the joint. Checking isn't so much a problem but cracks that run the
length of the joint-knob are frustratingly common.


> I just fill the checks and go on- or keep cutting till the check runs out.

Yeah. On sticks that are too nifty to toss, I fill the crack with
wood-glue and wood-dust. The wood is durable enough that it doesn't seem
to affect the end product. Just offends my sensibilities. :-)

Peace favor your sword (IH),
Kirk


03 May 2006 12:20:29
Shuurai
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons


Rabid Weasel wrote:
> On Wed, 03 May 2006 11:01:37 -0700, Shuurai wrote:
>
> >
> >> >Never cared for linseed oil because it tends to smell, and will yellow
> >> >the wood.
> >>
> >> Only because you don't know how to properly use linseed oil.
> >
> > It doesn't matter how you use linseed oil - it smells and it yellows
> > the wood. If you're using something like white oak, that can be enough
> > to make it unattractive.
> >
> > Lemon oil on the other hand smells nice, and doesn't discolor the wood.
> >
> > I am honored that you've decided to snipe at me like a little bitch. I
> > was worried you'd let Kirk have all the fun.
>
> He's still trying to look up on line what I meant by not wanting the grain
> to "run out."

I think it would be cool to write a bot that would scan posts on this
forum, do a quick Google on keywords within, and find something that at
least seemed relevant as a response. I would call it the Human
Argument Linker. Just need to find the right acronym...



03 May 2006 19:29:04
Rabid Weasel
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons

On Wed, 03 May 2006 12:20:29 -0700, Shuurai wrote:

>
> Rabid Weasel wrote:
>> On Wed, 03 May 2006 11:01:37 -0700, Shuurai wrote:
>>
>> >
>> >> >Never cared for linseed oil because it tends to smell, and will yellow
>> >> >the wood.
>> >>
>> >> Only because you don't know how to properly use linseed oil.
>> >
>> > It doesn't matter how you use linseed oil - it smells and it yellows
>> > the wood. If you're using something like white oak, that can be enough
>> > to make it unattractive.
>> >
>> > Lemon oil on the other hand smells nice, and doesn't discolor the wood.
>> >
>> > I am honored that you've decided to snipe at me like a little bitch. I
>> > was worried you'd let Kirk have all the fun.
>>
>> He's still trying to look up on line what I meant by not wanting the grain
>> to "run out."
>
> I think it would be cool to write a bot that would scan posts on this
> forum, do a quick Google on keywords within, and find something that at
> least seemed relevant as a response. I would call it the Human
> Argument Linker. Just need to find the right acronym...

<snork >

2 points.

Peace favor your sword (IH),
Kirk


04 May 2006 06:08:15
theoriginaldimi
Re: Question about caring for hardwood weapons


mikejc563@yahoo.com schreef:

> Have some hardwood Filipino sticks(epee, kamagong) and some are drying
> out. Friend recommended using Mineral oil on them and then sealing
> them with wax( I forget what kind...)
>
> Anyone have any recommendations/advice? And also how to apply them.
>
> TIA,
>
> Mike

You know you really should ask Wannabe. Nobody loves hard wood, and
applying TLC to it, as well as he.

Dimitri