29 Jul 2003 17:41:04
Karim Rashad
Did Saddam use magic powers to elude the Coalition?

Saw this on another ng. Maybe one of Saddam's 'magician advisors' is Pak
Seringen? :)
---------

7/29/03
James Hider
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,7374-760106,00.html

Iraqis believe the fugitive is protected by the occult and a mystic stone,
writes our correspondent from Baghdad

DESPITE the deaths of his sons, the $25 million (L15 million) reward on
his head and a manhunt by American forces, many Iraqis doubt that Saddam
Hussein will ever be caught. His secret, they believe, is a magic stone
and years of dabbling in the occult.

"Saddam never takes any step unless he consults with his magician advisers
-- I'm sure he has two or three with him now," Qassem Ali, 33, a Baghdad
electrician, said.

"He brought them from China and Japan because he wanted specialists," said
Ali Mahdi, his colleague and one of a crowd of people who gathered in the
street to discuss their former leader's supernatural abilities. "Saddam is
indestructible because of these powers."

The former regime was obsessed with the dark arts, a preoccupation of
Hitler in his final years, but many Iraqis also believe in the
supernatural and regularly consult soothsayers to find stolen cars or
tackle mental illness.

Most agree that Saddam wore a "magic" stone around his neck, protecting
him from assassins' bullets, and many recalled an appeal on Uday Hussein's
television network for anyone with extraordinary powers to come forward
and work for the ruling family.

Some of the stories are absurd, but are delivered deadpan by Iraqis whose
belief in the supernatural has grown during decades of brutal repression
and isolation from the outside world.

"It's all true about the magic stone," Mokhaled Muhammad, a car dealer and
Saddam supporter, said. "First of all, he put it on a chicken and tried to
shoot it. Then he put it on a cow, and the bullets went around it.

"When they pulled down Saddam's statue, lots of men were jumping on it
like monkeys. Then a child came up and kissed the head. Why? I think the
child was an angel."

In an inconspicuous house in the Shorta Rabba neighbourhood of Baghdad,
Abu Ali, a tiny 45-year-old man with an elfish grin, earns his living by
summoning up a djinn, or genie, for believers seeking stolen property or
looking to lift curses. His success was such that many former leaders came
to him, including Uday, Saddam's eldest son, who was killed with his
brother, Qusay, in a battle with American forces last week.

"Uday and his guards had an all-night party and fell asleep at dawn, dead
drunk," he said. "When they woke up they found that somebody had stolen
all the money from their pockets. Uday sent someone to me to find the
money. I discovered the thief, and they said Uday punished him, though I
don't know exactly what happened to him."

His method involves placing a child in front of a mirror and asking the
genie -- which appears as a man dressed in white -- to point to stolen
property. He also claims to have lifted a curse on a female relative of
Abid Hamid Mahmoud al-Tikriti, Saddam's cousin and close aide.

Saddam also feared the powers of his voodoo advisers. According to one
story, he shot dead a fortune-teller who informed him before the war that
he would be an outcast within months and prophesied that Iraq's monarchy
would be restored.

Mr Ali recalled how, one day, Saddam's security agents turned up on his
doorstep and accused him of plotting to use his magic against the
dictator.He says that he convinced them that he was doing no such thing,
then put a curse on the neighbour who had informed on him to the police.
She was paralysed after a blood vessel burst in her brain, he boasted.

Alharith Hassan, a psychologist at the Baghdad University Department of
Parapsychology, has spent years trying to debunk such superstitions
scientifically. His work cost his department dear in slashed funding under
Saddam's occultist regime.

He said that the Iraqi people had become very susceptible to such myths in
35 years cut off from the outside world and suffering brutal oppression.
The only outlet was provided by religion and sects, which Saddam openly
endorsed. His peasant mother used to read the future with seashells.

In a country where an estimated 20 per cent of people suffer some form of
post-traumatic stress disorder, about two thirds of the patients coming to
see Dr Hassan had already visited shamans, who try to exorcise genies with
spells and often viciously beat their mentally ill clients.

"It's all a lot of gibberish," said Dr Hassan, who was careful,
nonetheless, not to dismiss the genie, a mythical creature mentioned in
the Koran.

Indeed, Saddam's legendary luck is also questioned by some occult
practitioners.

While putting a man seeking his stolen car into a trance, Mr Ali asked his
genie if Saddam would be arrested. The man's hand slowly twisted palm
outward.

"Saddam will be caught," he said. "I know he has a stone against bullets,
but they will capture him."


--
Karim Rashad <remove SPAMFREE: krashad@SPAMFREEorbisuk.com >



29 Jul 2003 22:14:30
Erik Squires
Re: Did Saddam use magic powers to elude the Coalition?

That's odd, didn't Manuel Noriega dabble in the occult as well, and wear red
underwear to make himself invincible or something like that?

So, did Bush Sr. have a habit of picking strong men who dabbled in the
occult to do his bidding? Is there a masonic connection? <grin >


Erik


"Karim Rashad" <me@privacy.net > wrote in message
news:pan.2003.07.29.16.41.04.797507@privacy.net...
> Saw this on another ng. Maybe one of Saddam's 'magician advisors' is Pak
> Seringen? :)
> ---------
>
> 7/29/03
> James Hider
> http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,7374-760106,00.html
>
> Iraqis believe the fugitive is protected by the occult and a mystic stone,
> writes our correspondent from Baghdad
>
> DESPITE the deaths of his sons, the $25 million (L15 million) reward on
> his head and a manhunt by American forces, many Iraqis doubt that Saddam
> Hussein will ever be caught. His secret, they believe, is a magic stone
> and years of dabbling in the occult.
>
> "Saddam never takes any step unless he consults with his magician advisers
> -- I'm sure he has two or three with him now," Qassem Ali, 33, a Baghdad
> electrician, said.
>
> "He brought them from China and Japan because he wanted specialists," said
> Ali Mahdi, his colleague and one of a crowd of people who gathered in the
> street to discuss their former leader's supernatural abilities. "Saddam is
> indestructible because of these powers."
>
> The former regime was obsessed with the dark arts, a preoccupation of
> Hitler in his final years, but many Iraqis also believe in the
> supernatural and regularly consult soothsayers to find stolen cars or
> tackle mental illness.
>
> Most agree that Saddam wore a "magic" stone around his neck, protecting
> him from assassins' bullets, and many recalled an appeal on Uday Hussein's
> television network for anyone with extraordinary powers to come forward
> and work for the ruling family.
>
> Some of the stories are absurd, but are delivered deadpan by Iraqis whose
> belief in the supernatural has grown during decades of brutal repression
> and isolation from the outside world.
>
> "It's all true about the magic stone," Mokhaled Muhammad, a car dealer and
> Saddam supporter, said. "First of all, he put it on a chicken and tried to
> shoot it. Then he put it on a cow, and the bullets went around it.
>
> "When they pulled down Saddam's statue, lots of men were jumping on it
> like monkeys. Then a child came up and kissed the head. Why? I think the
> child was an angel."
>
> In an inconspicuous house in the Shorta Rabba neighbourhood of Baghdad,
> Abu Ali, a tiny 45-year-old man with an elfish grin, earns his living by
> summoning up a djinn, or genie, for believers seeking stolen property or
> looking to lift curses. His success was such that many former leaders came
> to him, including Uday, Saddam's eldest son, who was killed with his
> brother, Qusay, in a battle with American forces last week.
>
> "Uday and his guards had an all-night party and fell asleep at dawn, dead
> drunk," he said. "When they woke up they found that somebody had stolen
> all the money from their pockets. Uday sent someone to me to find the
> money. I discovered the thief, and they said Uday punished him, though I
> don't know exactly what happened to him."
>
> His method involves placing a child in front of a mirror and asking the
> genie -- which appears as a man dressed in white -- to point to stolen
> property. He also claims to have lifted a curse on a female relative of
> Abid Hamid Mahmoud al-Tikriti, Saddam's cousin and close aide.
>
> Saddam also feared the powers of his voodoo advisers. According to one
> story, he shot dead a fortune-teller who informed him before the war that
> he would be an outcast within months and prophesied that Iraq's monarchy
> would be restored.
>
> Mr Ali recalled how, one day, Saddam's security agents turned up on his
> doorstep and accused him of plotting to use his magic against the
> dictator.He says that he convinced them that he was doing no such thing,
> then put a curse on the neighbour who had informed on him to the police.
> She was paralysed after a blood vessel burst in her brain, he boasted.
>
> Alharith Hassan, a psychologist at the Baghdad University Department of
> Parapsychology, has spent years trying to debunk such superstitions
> scientifically. His work cost his department dear in slashed funding under
> Saddam's occultist regime.
>
> He said that the Iraqi people had become very susceptible to such myths in
> 35 years cut off from the outside world and suffering brutal oppression.
> The only outlet was provided by religion and sects, which Saddam openly
> endorsed. His peasant mother used to read the future with seashells.
>
> In a country where an estimated 20 per cent of people suffer some form of
> post-traumatic stress disorder, about two thirds of the patients coming to
> see Dr Hassan had already visited shamans, who try to exorcise genies with
> spells and often viciously beat their mentally ill clients.
>
> "It's all a lot of gibberish," said Dr Hassan, who was careful,
> nonetheless, not to dismiss the genie, a mythical creature mentioned in
> the Koran.
>
> Indeed, Saddam's legendary luck is also questioned by some occult
> practitioners.
>
> While putting a man seeking his stolen car into a trance, Mr Ali asked his
> genie if Saddam would be arrested. The man's hand slowly twisted palm
> outward.
>
> "Saddam will be caught," he said. "I know he has a stone against bullets,
> but they will capture him."
>
>
> --
> Karim Rashad <remove SPAMFREE: krashad@SPAMFREEorbisuk.com>
>




30 Jul 2003 15:01:00
Don Wagner
Re: Did Saddam use magic powers to elude the Coalition?

"Erik Squires" <erik_squires@hotFILTERmail.com > wrote:
>So, did Bush Sr. have a habit of picking strong men who dabbled in the
>occult to do his bidding? Is there a masonic connection? <grin>
>
>Erik

Both Bush cabals are attempting to eliminate the threat of potential
occult enemies overtaking the secret US project known as Arcana-Gold.

In 1979 the CIA stole Swiss bank account numbers from a Belgian banker
named Wilfred Marrs. These numbers allowed access to a lead sealed
box containing the head of John the Baptist and, oddly enough, what
appears to be Mjollnir.

Communication was established with the head through the last surviving
member of Nixons telepathic, LSD addicted, psi-twins program. The
head then began to pass on information concerning the growing re-birth
of occult powers throughout the world. The US responded by creating
Arcana-Gold.

The Masonic connection is a given.
;-)
--Don--
Let me show you how the guards used to do it...


30 Jul 2003 12:07:25
Ahktragal
Re: Did Saddam use magic powers to elude the Coalition?

dawagner@ix.netcom.com (Don Wagner) wrote in message news:<3f27db5a.103530458@news.qwest.net >...
> "Erik Squires" <erik_squires@hotFILTERmail.com> wrote:
> >So, did Bush Sr. have a habit of picking strong men who dabbled in the
> >occult to do his bidding? Is there a masonic connection? <grin>
> >
> >Erik
>
> Both Bush cabals are attempting to eliminate the threat of potential
> occult enemies overtaking the secret US project known as Arcana-Gold.
>
> In 1979 the CIA stole Swiss bank account numbers from a Belgian banker
> named Wilfred Marrs. These numbers allowed access to a lead sealed
> box containing the head of John the Baptist and, oddly enough, what
> appears to be Mjollnir.
>
> Communication was established with the head through the last surviving
> member of Nixons telepathic, LSD addicted, psi-twins program. The
> head then began to pass on information concerning the growing re-birth
> of occult powers throughout the world. The US responded by creating
> Arcana-Gold.
>
> The Masonic connection is a given.

But bear in mind that the Masons are just a front for the Jews, who are
in turn just a front for the cult of Cthulu.


30 Jul 2003 21:59:27
ordosclan
Re: Did Saddam use magic powers to elude the Coalition?

"Karim Rashad" <me@privacy.net > wrote in message news:<pan.2003.07.29.16.41.04.797507@privacy.net>...

> "He brought them from China and Japan because he wanted specialists," said

Talk about going jewish....

> "Uday and his guards had an all-night party and fell asleep at dawn, dead
> drunk," he said. "When they woke up they found that somebody had stolen
> all the money from their pockets. Uday sent someone to me to find the
> money. I discovered the thief, and they said Uday punished him, though I
> don't know exactly what happened to him."

Starting to form a picture about the arab mind are we folks?

> In a country where an estimated 20 per cent of people suffer some form of
> post-traumatic stress disorder, about two thirds of the patients coming to
> see Dr Hassan had already visited shamans, who try to exorcise genies with
> spells and often viciously beat their mentally ill clients.

Hey it works... sometimes...

> While putting a man seeking his stolen car into a trance, Mr Ali asked his
> genie if Saddam would be arrested. The man's hand slowly twisted palm
> outward.

What was his middle finger doing?

> "Saddam will be caught," he said. "I know he has a stone against bullets,
> but they will capture him."

Nickswine had quaker secret servicemen protecting him.

ordosclan@mail.hongkong.com