30 Sep 2004 10:06:18
Jelmer
an actual use for siteswap

Hi,

My roommate here, in the Uni is working on a discrete optimisation problem
that is simmilar to siteswap. Since I suck at discrete math, I would like
to know the following:

What is the total number of possible states using n balls, and a maximum
throw of m?
What is an efficient way to calculate them if n = 16 and m = 100 or
something like that?

I looked in SS bens book but couldn't find anything. Does anyone know a
link?

thanks,
Jelmer

----== posted via www.jugglingdb.com ==----



30 Sep 2004 10:32:51
Peter Bone
Re: an actual use for siteswap

Jelmer wrote:
> Hi,
>
> My roommate here, in the Uni is working on a discrete optimisation problem
> that is simmilar to siteswap. Since I suck at discrete math, I would like
> to know the following:
>
> What is the total number of possible states using n balls, and a maximum
> throw of m?
> What is an efficient way to calculate them if n = 16 and m = 100 or
> something like that?
>
> I looked in SS bens book but couldn't find anything. Does anyone know a
> link?

I think it's

m nCr n (m combinatorial n nCr = n!/(r!.(n-r)!) )

Because this gives the number of different arrangments of the state
sequence - since the state will be m digits long and contain n 1's.

Peter

----== posted via www.jugglingdb.com ==----



30 Sep 2004 11:31:56
juggling jacko
Re: an actual use for siteswap

Just on this subject, i don't understand state/ground state siteswaps.
I have read Ben SS guide, but I can't make any sense of it.
Could someone please break down states for me.

Thanks heaps!!!

Keep on juggling!!!


<<<<juggling jacko >>>>

----== posted via www.jugglingdb.com ==----



30 Sep 2004 16:25:22
Jack Boyce
Re: an actual use for siteswap

Peter Bone wrote:
> Jelmer wrote:
> > Hi,
> >
> > My roommate here, in the Uni is working on a discrete optimisation problem
> > that is simmilar to siteswap. Since I suck at discrete math, I would like
> > to know the following:
> >
> > What is the total number of possible states using n balls, and a maximum
> > throw of m?
> > What is an efficient way to calculate them if n = 16 and m = 100 or
> > something like that?
> >
> > I looked in SS bens book but couldn't find anything. Does anyone know a
> > link?
>
> I think it's
>
> m nCr n (m combinatorial n nCr = n!/(r!.(n-r)!) )
>
> Because this gives the number of different arrangments of the state
> sequence - since the state will be m digits long and contain n 1's.
>
> Peter
>
> ----== posted via www.jugglingdb.com ==----


That's right. In this case, (100 choose 16) is a big number, so you
wouldn't want to try drawing a state diagram!

http://www.google.com/search?q=100+choose+16

Jack


----== posted via www.jugglingdb.com ==----



30 Sep 2004 18:01:57
Aidan
Re: an actual use for siteswap

juggling jacko wrote:
> Just on this subject, i don't understand state/ground state siteswaps.
> I have read Ben SS guide, but I can't make any sense of it.
> Could someone please break down states for me.
>
> Thanks heaps!!!
>
> Keep on juggling!!!
>
>
> <<<<juggling jacko>>>>
>
> ----== posted via www.jugglingdb.com ==----

I posted something on this a while ago:
http://www.jugglingdb.com/news/article.php?id=<41266883$0$58817$bed64819@news.gradwell.netcolor=#0000FF> >&thread=true&pos=358
HTH
Aidan.


----== posted via www.jugglingdb.com ==----