17 Mar 2007 19:40:30
Racquetball with a tin?

What would racquetball be like if there was a tin on the front wall as
in squash? Essentially limiting the lowness of front wall shots to
about 17 inches. IMHO, super-low kills make playing the game a little
boring and I would like to have more rallies. Of course, I could just
play squash, but finding a court is near impossible in most areas.

G



19 Mar 2007 02:19:56
Matthew David Hills
Re: Racquetball with a tin?

<gklemoine@comcast.net > wrote:
>What would racquetball be like if there was a tin on the front wall as
>in squash? Essentially limiting the lowness of front wall shots to
>about 17 inches. IMHO, super-low kills make playing the game a little
>boring and I would like to have more rallies. Of course, I could just
>play squash, but finding a court is near impossible in most areas.

Get 4x5' lengths of wooden trim, and use carpet tape to tack them down on the
front wall. See if you and your partner like it. (don't forget to pack it up
when you go home). This type of system is often used in the convertible
racquetball/squash courts. (should also verify that the tape won't delaminate
front-wall paint)

Personally, I don't really see the possibility of kill shots to be a problem.
Normally the allure of kill shots is tempered by the increased risk of
skipping the ball. What level are you guys?

If a player is hitting them with impunity, this usually means that they are
able to get to the ball and set their feet well, which means their opponent
should rethink their shot selection. From watching pros, it is amazing how
much energy they put into court coverage. I don't see 90-shot endurance
rallis like in squash, but rallies are sustained at a very high intensity...

I'd think serves are usually a bigger culprit in the short (1-to-3 shot
rallies). Might want to try "single serve" rules or only doing lob serves.

Matt



19 Mar 2007 09:14:02
Re: Racquetball with a tin?

These are excellent suggestions. I am a former squash player and
would play if there were courts available locally. It is too bad they
didn't pursue convertable courts like they did at my alma mater in
NJ. Anyway, our skill level is still relatively low so serves are
probably the problem. Having the cover the full width of the court
for returns is annoying unless you are uber-quick. I will probably
try the lob serve idea until I improve my speed and fitness. I was 50
pounds lighter in my college days about 15 years ago.

Thanks for you help,
G



20 Mar 2007 20:08:09
Matthew David Hills
Re: Racquetball with a tin?

<gklemoine@comcast.net > wrote:
>Anyway, our skill level is still relatively low so serves are
>probably the problem. Having the cover the full width of the court
>for returns is annoying unless you are uber-quick.

I expect you'll figure this one out as you keep playing.
Where are you standing as you wait for the serve, and have you practiced any
of the serve return footwork?

Derek Robinson's DVD has a nice section that covers some of this:
http://www.racquetballwarehouse.com/descpage.html?PCODE=BIGDVD

Matt


22 Mar 2007 09:11:32
Re: Racquetball with a tin?

On Mar 20, 4:08 pm, h...@Stanford.EDU (Matthew David Hills) wrote:
> I expect you'll figure this one out as you keep playing.
> Where are you standing as you wait for the serve, and have you practiced any
> of the serve return footwork?

I have a book by Ed Turner and Woody Clouse which is good. I just
haven't looked at the serve return section yet. I think I just like
the calmness of the lob serve that I am accustomed to from squash.
Returning it is just mentally intense rather than physical and
mental. My partners have agreed to lob serves for the time being. I
actually prefer serving that way too. Again, the calm before the
storm of the rally. I just like it better.

G