29 Nov 2004 22:20:00
Danzig
your help appreciated.

I am getting together a group of folks for a seminar on the
multi-faceted challenge of wagering on horses in the simulcast era. If
you went to a seminar (speakers include a trainer, retired rider,
cappers, internet experts as well as a breeding analyst) what would YOU
want to get out of it?


29 Nov 2004 18:57:18
Ken Woodall
Re: your help appreciated.

Inside info on why connections alter training or workouts, and
strategy on placement in races.



30 Nov 2004 10:02:20
Ream
Re: your help appreciated.


"Danzig" <tyatcak@telus.net > wrote

> I am getting together a group of folks for a seminar on the
> multi-faceted challenge of wagering on horses in the simulcast era. If
> you went to a seminar (speakers include a trainer,

Rate the importance of workouts.

> retired rider,

How often did you receive instructions, from a trainer, on how
to ride a horse. How often were they followed?

> cappers, internet experts as well as a breeding analyst) what would YOU
> want to get out of it?

Laters.....
reamone@gmail.com




01 Dec 2004 02:20:15
Bob Fritz
Re: your help appreciated.

I don't know if this is the kind of answer you're looking for, but if I were
speaking at your seminar, I think my talk would be on money management and
discipline. I know I've got a lot of room to talk, but with so much action
out there, one is behooved to concentrate on one or two tracks, or at least
find some way to carefully choose the spots.

Bob

"Danzig" <tyatcak@telus.net > wrote in message
news:kgNqd.208410$df2.98237@edtnps89...
> I am getting together a group of folks for a seminar on the
> multi-faceted challenge of wagering on horses in the simulcast era. If
> you went to a seminar (speakers include a trainer, retired rider,
> cappers, internet experts as well as a breeding analyst) what would YOU
> want to get out of it?




01 Dec 2004 07:41:53
F.H.
Re: your help appreciated.

Danzig wrote:
> I am getting together a group of folks for a seminar on the
> multi-faceted challenge of wagering on horses in the simulcast era. If
> you went to a seminar (speakers include a trainer, retired rider,
> cappers, internet experts as well as a breeding analyst) what would YOU
> want to get out of it?

The one element that changed my handicapping perspective the most and
had the best overall influence on my betting was starting my own small
business. Not just meeting a payroll and all the usual business stuff
but seeing how friends and competitors with similar business's excelled,
barely stayed above water, or failed.

The race track is a swarm of small businesses (owners, trainers)
independent contractors (riders) and salesmen (agents) each trying to
make ends meet week after week and looking at the game from *that*
perspective eliminates a lot of the silly speculation about fixed races
etc.

I would like to hear a trainer of note walk the attendees through a few
real live examples of good deals and bad ones from start (claim?) to
finish (lame or fame). Vet bills, equipment experiments and strategies,
owner expectations and attitudes etc..

Frank




01 Dec 2004 12:51:17
Bob Fritz
Re: your help appreciated.

That's a good idea. If you really want to be cured of the fixed-race blues,
walk around the backstretch of a minor-league track, especially in the
winter, and ask yourself, "Do these people look like they have inside
information?"

Bob

"F.H." <connectu2@verizon.net > wrote in message
news:5Berd.5822$Hk6.1860@trnddc05...
> Danzig wrote:
> > I am getting together a group of folks for a seminar on the
> > multi-faceted challenge of wagering on horses in the simulcast era. If
> > you went to a seminar (speakers include a trainer, retired rider,
> > cappers, internet experts as well as a breeding analyst) what would YOU
> > want to get out of it?
>
> The one element that changed my handicapping perspective the most and
> had the best overall influence on my betting was starting my own small
> business. Not just meeting a payroll and all the usual business stuff
> but seeing how friends and competitors with similar business's excelled,
> barely stayed above water, or failed.
>
> The race track is a swarm of small businesses (owners, trainers)
> independent contractors (riders) and salesmen (agents) each trying to
> make ends meet week after week and looking at the game from *that*
> perspective eliminates a lot of the silly speculation about fixed races
> etc.
>
> I would like to hear a trainer of note walk the attendees through a few
> real live examples of good deals and bad ones from start (claim?) to
> finish (lame or fame). Vet bills, equipment experiments and strategies,
> owner expectations and attitudes etc..
>
> Frank
>
>