27 Sep 2004 06:24:02
Home For Sale
Overweight Question

who is overweight the jockey or horse

if it is the jock, how come he is not overweight in all his races

if it is the horse, how and where do they weigh them

confused

please help



27 Sep 2004 11:09:14
Bob Fritz
Re: Overweight Question

It's the jockey, and the jockey is not overweight in all races because the
assigned weight is different for each race.
Horses are rarely weighed. Remington Park was posting horse weights for a
while, but it didn't seem to mean much as far as handicapping.

Bob

"Home For Sale" <homeowner123@webtv.net > wrote in message
news:13517-4157EA42-124@storefull-3174.bay.webtv.net...
> who is overweight the jockey or horse
>
> if it is the jock, how come he is not overweight in all his races
>
> if it is the horse, how and where do they weigh them
>
> confused
>
> please help
>




27 Sep 2004 18:16:35
Fager
Re: Overweight Question


"Bob Fritz" <BOBFRITZ@prodigy.net > wrote in message
news:txS5d.59706$wV.32299@attbi_s54...
> It's the jockey, and the jockey is not overweight in all races because the
> assigned weight is different for each race.
> Horses are rarely weighed. Remington Park was posting horse weights for a
> while, but it didn't seem to mean much as far as handicapping.

I would love to know the horse's weight listed for each performance. A horse
off his weight is probably not going to deliver a top effort, just like a
human. Dog racing enthusiasts seem to think it's a valid part of
handicapping. The only info that I might find more important and currently
don't have access to is the listing of the vet for each horse.

Fager




27 Sep 2004 19:38:41
byrdman
Re: Overweight Question



Bob Fritz wrote:
> It's the jockey, and the jockey is not overweight in all races because the
> assigned weight is different for each race.
> Horses are rarely weighed. Remington Park was posting horse weights for a
> while, but it didn't seem to mean much as far as handicapping.
>
> Bob
>
I was on vacation with some friends in Puerto Rico around 1968. We went
to El Commandante Racetrack. This one friend, who is a very good
handicapper, bet on a horse that finished second. After a long delay
after the race, they announced that the winner was disqualified because
the jockey was not carrying the correct weight. And my friend had the
nerve to tell me that he had figured that in his handicapping...as he
walked to the window to cash his now winning ticket!!

byrdman



27 Sep 2004 22:20:05
MMcC
Re: Overweight Question

On Mon, 27 Sep 2004 18:16:35 GMT, "Fager"
<socianonospam@earthlink.net > wrote:

>
>"Bob Fritz" <BOBFRITZ@prodigy.net> wrote in message
>news:txS5d.59706$wV.32299@attbi_s54...
>> It's the jockey, and the jockey is not overweight in all races because the
>> assigned weight is different for each race.
>> Horses are rarely weighed. Remington Park was posting horse weights for a
>> while, but it didn't seem to mean much as far as handicapping.
>
>I would love to know the horse's weight listed for each performance. A horse
>off his weight is probably not going to deliver a top effort, just like a
>human. Dog racing enthusiasts seem to think it's a valid part of
>handicapping. The only info that I might find more important and currently
>don't have access to is the listing of the vet for each horse.


They do show the horse's weight in some places, HK and I think in Aus.

But knowing the weight in and off itself wouldn't be much use unless
you knew some specifics about the horse, like whether he was under or
over weight to begin with before he lost or gained any. Small
fluctuations in weight are normal.
It's a good thing for the trainer to know and they some do weigh their
horses, but the average punter would need more information to be able
to disern whether whether the flucuation is a good or bad thing. A
horse losing weight could mean the horse is getting fitter, but it
could also mean he is off his food, upset, or sick. The same with
weight gain, it could mean the horse has beefed up and put on more
muscle or he hasn't been worked as hard and is getting fatter.
Keep in mind also that a TB's are growing until they are 5 years old,
so they're getting bigger and putting on more bulk. So you see a 4
year old who hasn't raced in 6 months listed as being heavier, it
doesn't neccesarily mean that he is overweight.

Like I said, unless you had some insider info, or really knew the
horse well, I don't think it would neccesarily be that helpful.


As regards greyhounds, the dogs are weighed to stop trainers trying to
pull a fast one. Dogs are only allowed to deviate up or down a certain
number of pounds (used to be 3 lbs) from their last race or qualifier.


28 Sep 2004 04:53:17
Fager
Re: Overweight Question


"MMcC" <inis@earthlings.com > wrote in message
news:rnjhl0p20e6099u2atolm7p41g17n3eq7d@4ax.com...
> They do show the horse's weight in some places, HK and I think in Aus.
>
> But knowing the weight in and off itself wouldn't be much use unless
> you knew some specifics about the horse, like whether he was under or
> over weight to begin with before he lost or gained any. Small
> fluctuations in weight are normal.
> It's a good thing for the trainer to know and they some do weigh their
> horses, but the average punter would need more information to be able
> to disern whether whether the flucuation is a good or bad thing. A
> horse losing weight could mean the horse is getting fitter, but it
> could also mean he is off his food, upset, or sick. The same with
> weight gain, it could mean the horse has beefed up and put on more
> muscle or he hasn't been worked as hard and is getting fatter.
> Keep in mind also that a TB's are growing until they are 5 years old,
> so they're getting bigger and putting on more bulk. So you see a 4
> year old who hasn't raced in 6 months listed as being heavier, it
> doesn't neccesarily mean that he is overweight.
>
> Like I said, unless you had some insider info, or really knew the
> horse well, I don't think it would neccesarily be that helpful.
>
>
> As regards greyhounds, the dogs are weighed to stop trainers trying to
> pull a fast one. Dogs are only allowed to deviate up or down a certain
> number of pounds (used to be 3 lbs) from their last race or qualifier.

Whether it's important to the handicapper is subjective. I want all the info
possible, then I'll do with it what I may. There's a lot of info out there
that I ignore. You can ignore the horse's weight if you choose.

As to 3 pounds on dog, that's significant; equal to maybe 50 on a horse
which I would certainly want to know.

Fager