25 Apr 2004 08:04:54
Scott
Short Breaks From Playing

By short breaks I mean a couple of days to a week.
Constant practice has a lot of downsides. You can find yourself slumping or
losing concentration and not even realising why or what your doing wrong.
A clean break helps you find your feet again. If your slumping really bad
take a week out. Then come back slowly.
Of course, if your playing league darts then its harder to take breaks
during the season, but my game improves with regular breaks. Seems to
breathe new life into it.

Anyone else agree that short breaks from playing improves your game?
Scott




25 Apr 2004 16:51:57
Dopey
Re: Short Breaks From Playing

In article <7qJic.4629$Kw2.3037@pathologist.blueyonder.net >, Scott
<lh014t2681@blueyonder.co.uk > wrote:

> By short breaks I mean a couple of days to a week.
> Constant practice has a lot of downsides. You can find yourself slumping or
> losing concentration and not even realising why or what your doing wrong.
> A clean break helps you find your feet again. If your slumping really bad
> take a week out. Then come back slowly.
> Of course, if your playing league darts then its harder to take breaks
> during the season, but my game improves with regular breaks. Seems to
> breathe new life into it.
>
> Anyone else agree that short breaks from playing improves your game?
> Scott

I do.

I think the same thing applies to other games with complex body
movements, like golf, for example. (I play about every three years, and
last time I shot a 79 over 18 holes...I'm thinking of quitting with
that!)

I am also prone to tendinitis in the elbow, so I simply can't practice
as hard and regularly as I perhaps should, so breaks are to let my body
deal with my rather snappy throwing style.

But I do think one should also shape one's practice to deal with the
weaknesses of one's game -- it doesn't really help you to shoot at the
bull for a half hour if you're already hitting 3 marks/round there, but
can't hit a double to save your life: practice the damn doubles! I find
that round the world is an excellent practice game, starting with
singles, then doubles, then triples (obviously, leaving out the bull on
the last one). This also illuminates your particular "sticky" doubles,
which you can then practice on.

Best,

Josh