06 Jan 2005 20:03:38
William Bullman
air gun training

I'm setting up a 10M indoor range in the basement for my son(12) and
myself to target shoot air rifle. He is going out for the school .22
rifle team in high school and I want to start training now.
Some people have stated starting on air rifle is a bad idea as it
teaches "bad" habits" for .22 and other firearms.
I have not yet had a chance for followup with these people directly but
I can not imagine the concern. If anything the longer hold time required
would teach better skills. Comments welcome.
TIA
===========================
Bill Bullman
NRA-Life
A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion,
butcher a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance
accounts, build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give
orders, cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem,
pitch manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently,
die gallantly. Specialization is for insects. - Robert Heinlein.
============================


06 Jan 2005 22:54:23
R
Re: air gun training

Those saying that are most likely referring to the practice of holding a
spring piston airgun loosely against the shoulder as opposed to holding a
firearm tightly. With a springer, you should hold the gun loosely to allow
for the unique recoil in order to shoot accurately. For a firearm, you are
usually taught to hold the gun tightly againt the shoulder. That being said,
if you were to get a pnuematic, PCP, or CO2 airgun, none of these have the
unique recoil of a springer and those claims of 'bad habits' would be
unfounded. They're not really bad habits, but are unique to shooting spring
piston airguns.
Thats my best guess on what they might be talking about.
"William Bullman" <wbullman@yahoo.com > wrote in message
news:SuSdndaTRvR2QkDcRVn-vQ@rcn.net...
> I'm setting up a 10M indoor range in the basement for my son(12) and
> myself to target shoot air rifle. He is going out for the school .22 rifle
> team in high school and I want to start training now.
> Some people have stated starting on air rifle is a bad idea as it teaches
> "bad" habits" for .22 and other firearms.
> I have not yet had a chance for followup with these people directly but I
> can not imagine the concern. If anything the longer hold time required
> would teach better skills. Comments welcome.
> TIA
> ===========================
> Bill Bullman
> NRA-Life
> A human being should be able to change a diaper, plan an invasion, butcher
> a hog, conn a ship, design a building, write a sonnet, balance accounts,
> build a wall, set a bone, comfort the dying, take orders, give orders,
> cooperate, act alone, solve equations, analyze a new problem, pitch
> manure, program a computer, cook a tasty meal, fight efficiently, die
> gallantly. Specialization is for insects. - Robert Heinlein.
> ============================




07 Jan 2005 22:52:49
TSBrat2002
Re: air gun training

>I'm setting up a 10M indoor range in the basement for my son (12) and myself
to target shoot air rifle.

Good luck to you. Hope you use a silent trap and safe backstop.

>Some people have stated starting on air rifle is a bad idea as it teaches
"bad" habits" for .22 and other firearms.

Even though hearing protection may not be needed like powder firearms, if
you start him off wearing them and safety glasses, that should carry over with
him for the .22s.

>If anything the longer hold time required
would teach better skills. Comments welcome.

I agree. I'm finding I enjoy air rifles more all the time, and wish I had
spent a good portion that was wasted on regular firearms over the last 15
years, to splitting the difference between a few good air rifles and a few good
.22s, plus a shotgun or two.



07 Jan 2005 20:49:31
Mike Nelson
Re: air gun training

William Bullman wrote:

> I'm setting up a 10M indoor range in the basement for my son(12) and
> myself to target shoot air rifle. He is going out for the school .22
> rifle team in high school and I want to start training now.
> Some people have stated starting on air rifle is a bad idea as it
> teaches "bad" habits" for .22 and other firearms.
> I have not yet had a chance for followup with these people directly but
> I can not imagine the concern. If anything the longer hold time required
> would teach better skills. Comments welcome.
> TIA

I'd be asking them what exactly about shooting airguns accurately is
going hurt their technique for rimfire. I'll bet they're hard pressed
to give a straight answer. Someone has already mentioned recoil, but
that's not really much of an issue for rimfire. And recoil is usually
responsible for flinching (OK, some say it's the noise). Either way
there's less of both with an air gun and less reason to learn to flinch.

I think learning to shoot a spring gun accurately will teach you a whole
lot more about shooting well, than hurting anything. In much the same
way riding a motorcycle won't teach you how to drive a car, riding one
will make you a much better driver, period. (Or you'll die, one of the
two :/ ). Basically a springer will magnify everything you do wrong,
just like a motorcycle will.

I also think air guns are easier to set up and practice with in the
house. Very little noise, no stink, very economical, and a whole lot
less dangerous. A 600 fps 8 grain pellet has 6 ft-lbs of energy and a
.22 long rifle has 200 ft-lbs (40 grain @ 1500 fps). All that should
make it easier to practice, and practice is the name of the game.

If there was one reason not to shoot an springer (doesn't apply to CO2
or air guns like pumps and PCPs), is that it can be frustrating to get
it right. There have been several times where the more I shot, the
worse I got and was quite ready to disassemble the rifle in a most
unpleasant way.

Then I'd take some deep breaths and painstakingly force myself to do
every step correctly. Pretty soon, what had grown to 1.5" groups were
back to .5". You want to keep it fun and not discouraging.

Kind regards

Mike